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The Lessons of Arnold Schoenberg in Teaching the Musikalische Gedanke

The Lessons of Arnold Schoenberg in Teaching the Musikalische Gedanke

Date: May 2009
Creator: Conlon, Colleen Marie
Description: Arnold Schoenberg's teaching career spanned over fifty years and included experiences in Austria, Germany, and the United States. Schoenberg's teaching assistant, Leonard Stein, transcribed Schoenberg's class lectures at UCLA from 1936 to 1944. Most of these notes resulted in publications that provide pedagogical examples of combined elements from Schoenberg's European years of teaching with his years of teaching in America. There are also class notes from Schoenberg's later lectures that have gone unexamined. These notes contain substantial examples of Schoenberg's later theories with analyses of masterworks that have never been published. Both the class notes and the subsequent publications reveal Schoenberg's comprehensive approach to understanding the presentation of the Gedanke or musical idea. In his later classes especially, Schoenberg demonstrated a method of analyzing musical compositions using illustrations of elements of the Grundgestalt or "basic shape," which contains the technical aspects of the musical parts. Through an examination of his published and unpublished manuscripts, this study will demonstrate Schoenberg's commitment to a comprehensive approach to teaching. Schoenberg's heritage of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century music theory is evident in his Harmonielehre and in his other European writings. The latter include Zusammenhang, Kontrapunkt, Instrumentation, Formenlehre (ZKIF), and Der musikalische Gedanke und die Logik, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Let His Conscience be her Guide: Ethical Self-Fashionings of Woman in Early-Modern Drama

Let His Conscience be her Guide: Ethical Self-Fashionings of Woman in Early-Modern Drama

Date: August 2003
Creator: Penque, Ruth Ida
Description: Female characters in early-modern drama, even when following the dictates of conscience, appear inextricably bound to patriarchal expectations. This paradoxical situation is explained by two elements that have affected the Renaissance playwright's depiction of woman as moral agent. First, the playwright's education would have included a traditional body of philosophical opinion regarding female intellectual and moral capacities that would have tried to explain rationally the necessity of woman's second-class status. However, by its nature, this body of information is filled with contradiction. Second, the playwright's education would have also included learning to use the rhetorical trope et utramque partem, that is arguing a position from all sides. Learning to use this trope would place the early-modern dramatist in the position of interrogating the contradictory notions of woman contained in the traditional sources. Six dramas covering over a sixty-year period from the mid-sixteenth to the early seventeenth centuries suggest that regardless of the type of work, comedy or tragedy, female characters are shown as adults seeking recognition as autonomous moral beings while living in a culture that works to maintain their dependent status. These works include an early comedy Ralph Roister Doister, a domestic tragedy A Woman Killed With Kindness, a ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
"Let the End be Legitimate": An Analysis of Federal District Court Decision Making in Voting Rights Cases, 1965-1993.

"Let the End be Legitimate": An Analysis of Federal District Court Decision Making in Voting Rights Cases, 1965-1993.

Date: May 1998
Creator: Morbitt, Jennifer Marie
Description: Integrated process models that combine both legal and extralegal variables provide a more accurate specification of the judicial decision making process and capture the complexity of the factors that shape judicial behavior. Judicial decision making theories borrow heavily from U.S. Supreme Court research, however, such theories may not automatically be applicable to the lower federal bench. The author uses vote dilution cases originating in the federal district courts from the years 1965 to 1993 to examine what motivates the behavior of district and circuit court judges. The author uses an integrated process model to assess what factors are important to the adjudication process and if there are significant differences between federal district and appellate court judges in decision making.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Lettermark: Digital Frontiers

Lettermark: Digital Frontiers

Date: 2012
Creator: Mondragon-Becker, Antonio
Description: This color lettermark was created for Digital Frontiers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letters from Jack and Other Cadavers

Letters from Jack and Other Cadavers

Date: May 2010
Creator: Leis, Aaron
Description: My dissertation, Letters from Jack and Other Cadavers, developed out of my interest in using persona, narrative forms, and historical details collected through thorough research to transform personal experience and emotions in my poems. The central series of poems, "Letters from Jack," is written in the voice of Jack the Ripper and set up as a series of poems-as-letters to the police who chased him. The Ripper's sense of self and his motivations are troubled by his search for a muse as the poems become love poems, contrasting the brutality of the historical murders and the atmosphere of late 19th century London with a charismatic speaker not unlike those of Browning's Dramatic Monologues. The dissertation's preface further explores my desire for a level of personal removal while crafting poems in order to temper sentimentality. Drawing on Wallace Stevens's notion that "Sentimentality is failed emotion" and Tony Hoagland's assessment that fear of sentimentality can turn young poets away from narrative forms, I examine my own poems along with those of Scott Cairns, Tim Seibles, and Albert Goldbarth to derive conclusions on the benefits distance, persona, narrative, and detail to downplay excessive emotion and the intrusion of the personal. Poems from the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letters, Liberty, and the Democratic Age in the Thought of Alexis de Tocqueville

Letters, Liberty, and the Democratic Age in the Thought of Alexis de Tocqueville

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2009
Creator: Elliot, Natalie J.
Description: When Alexis de Tocqueville observed the spread of modern democracy across France, England, and the United States, he saw that democracy would give rise to a new state of letters, and that this new state of letters would influence how democratic citizens and statesmen would understand the new political world. As he reflected on this new intellectual sphere, Tocqueville became concerned that democracy would foster changes in language and thought that would stifle concepts and ideas essential to the preservation of intellectual and political liberty. In an effort to direct, refine, and reshape political thought in democracy, Tocqueville undertook a critique of the democratic state of letters, assessing intellectual life and contributing his own ideas and concepts to help citizens and statesmen think more coherently about democratic politics. Here, I analyze Tocqueville's critique and offer an account of his effort to reshape democratic political thought. I show that through his analyses of the role of intellectuals in democratic regimes, the influence of modern science on democratic public life, the intellectual habits that democracy fosters, and the power of literary works for shaping democratic self-understanding, Tocqueville succeeds in reshaping democratic language and thought in a manner that contributes to the preservation ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Date: Summer 2011
Creator: Greyson, Bruce
Description: Six letters written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the following topics: "Some Basic Problems with the Term 'Near-Death Experience,'" "Response to 'Some Basic Problems with the Term 'Near-Death Experience,'" "On Demographic Research into Near-Death Experiences," "Why do Near-Death Experiences seem so Real?" "Almost Brainless -- Yet Lucid and Intelligent: Implications for Understanding NDEs and Consciousness," and "Near-Death Experiences and EEG Surges at End of Life."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Date: Winter 2009
Creator: Atwater, P. M. H.; Moore, Roberta & Kason, Yvonne
Description: Three letters written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the topics: "Response to 'Review of The Big Book of Near-Death Experiences,'" "Response to 'Did Emanuel Swedenborg have Near-Death Experiences,'" and "U.S. Release of Farther Shores."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Date: Summer 2009
Creator: van Wees, Ruud & Perera, Mahendra
Description: Two letters written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the topics: "Was Jesus Christ's decent into hell a near-death experience?" and "Population-based Prevalence Studies of NDEs."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Date: Winter 2010
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner
Description: A letter written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the topic: "Response to 'Is it Rational to Extrapolate from the Presence of Consciousness during a Flat EEG to Survival of Consciousness After Death?'"
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries