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 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Field Dependence of Optical Properties in Quantum Well Heterostructures Within the Wentzel, Kramers, and Brillouin Approximation

Field Dependence of Optical Properties in Quantum Well Heterostructures Within the Wentzel, Kramers, and Brillouin Approximation

Date: August 1989
Creator: Wallace, Andrew B.
Description: This dissertation is a theoretical treatment of the electric field dependence of optical properties such as Quantum Confined Stark (QCS) shifts, Photoluminescence Quenching (PLQ), and Excitonic Mixing in quantum well heterostructures. The reduced spatial dimensionality in heterostructures greatly enhances these optical properties, more than in three dimensional semiconductors. Charge presence in the quantum well from doping causes the potential to bend and deviate from the ideal square well potential. A potential bending that varies as the square of distance measured from the heterostructure interfaces is derived self-consistently. This potential is used to solve the time-independent Schrodinger equation for bound state energies and wave functions within the framework of the Wentzel, Kramers, and Brillouin (WKB) approximation. The theoretical results obtained from the WKB approximation are limited to wide gap semiconductors with large split off bands such as gallium arsenide-gallium aluminum arsenide and indium gallium arsenide—indium phosphide. Quantum wells with finite confinement heights give rise to an energy dependent WKB phase. External electric and magnetic fields are incorporated into the theory for two different geometries. For electric fields applied perpendicular to the heterostructure multilayers, QCS shifts and PLQ are found to be in excellent agreement with the WKB calculations. Orthogonality between electrons ...
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Field Extensions and Galois Theory

Field Extensions and Galois Theory

Date: August 1967
Creator: Votaw, Charles I.
Description: This paper will be devoted to an exposition of some of the relationships existing between a field and certain of its extension fields. In particular, it will be shown that many fields may be characterized rather simply in terms of their subfields which, in turn, may be directly correlated with the subgroups of a finite group of automorphisms of the given field.
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A Field Follow-Up Study of Beginning Elementary Teachers

A Field Follow-Up Study of Beginning Elementary Teachers

Date: June 1961
Creator: Tate, James Oliver, 1929-
Description: The present study was made to determine the relationship between the level of teaching effectiveness of beginning elementary teachers and three individual characteristics of prospective teachers. A secondary purpose was an attempt to improve the service rendered by the School of Education at North Texas State College, Denton, Texas, in the selection and guidance of students who indicate a desire to enter the program for preparing elementary teachers.
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A Field Test of Garland's Cognitive Mediation Theory of Goal Setting

A Field Test of Garland's Cognitive Mediation Theory of Goal Setting

Date: August 1987
Creator: Bagnall, Jamie
Description: None
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Fielding's Creative Psychology: A Belief in the Good-Natured Man

Fielding's Creative Psychology: A Belief in the Good-Natured Man

Date: December 1972
Creator: Dundas, Doris Hart
Description: The philosophy of Henry Fielding turns more upon a study of human nature than upon any stated adherence to a system of beliefs. The thesis of this paper is that he was a moderate law-and-order Anglican of his time, but strongly influenced by the deist Shaftesbury's studies of the psychological characteristics of men. These inquiries into motivations and Shaftesbury's advocacy of the social virtue of desiring good for others seem to have helped determine Fielding's philosophy.
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Fields and Armor: A Comparative Analysis of English Feudalism and Japanese Hokensei

Fields and Armor: A Comparative Analysis of English Feudalism and Japanese Hokensei

Date: December 2011
Creator: Garrison, Arthur Thomas
Description: Fields and Armor is a comparative study of English feudalism from the Norman Conquest until the reign of King Henry II (1154-1189) and Japan’s first military government, the Kamakura Bakufu (1185- 1333). This thesis was designed to examine the validity of a European-Japanese comparison. Such comparisons have been attempted in the past. However, many historians on both sides of the equation have levied some serious criticism against these endeavors. In light, of these valid criticisms, this thesis has been a comparison of medieval English government and that of the Kamakura-Samurai, because of a variety of geographic, cultural and social similarities that existed in both regions. These similarities include similar military organizations and parallel developments, which resulted in the formation of two of most centralized military governments in either Western Europe or East Asia, and finally, the presence and real enforcement of two forms of unitary inheritance in both locales.
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The Fifteen "Mystery" Sonatas of H.I.F. Biber (1644-1704)

The Fifteen "Mystery" Sonatas of H.I.F. Biber (1644-1704)

Date: August 1967
Creator: Vollen, Linda Hunt
Description: None
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The Fifth and Sixth Clarinet Concertos by Johann Melchoir Molter: A Lecture Recital Together with Three Additional Recitals

The Fifth and Sixth Clarinet Concertos by Johann Melchoir Molter: A Lecture Recital Together with Three Additional Recitals

Date: August 1976
Creator: Shanley, Richard A.
Description: None
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Fifth Grade Students as Emotional Helpers with Kindergarten Children, Using Play Therapy Procedures and Skills

Fifth Grade Students as Emotional Helpers with Kindergarten Children, Using Play Therapy Procedures and Skills

Date: December 2001
Creator: Robinson, Julianna M. Ziegler
Description: This research study investigated the effectiveness of a filial therapy training model as a method to train fifth grade students in child-centered play therapy skills and procedures. Filial therapy is an intervention that focuses on strengthening and enhancing adult-child relationships. The fifth grade students were trained to be a therapeutic change agent for kindergarten children identified as having adjustment difficulties, by utilizing basic child-centered play therapy skills in weekly play sessions with the kindergarten children. Specifically, this research determined the effectiveness of filial therapy in increasing the fifth grade students': 1) empathic responses with kindergarten children; 2) communication of acceptance with kindergarten children; 3) allowance of self-direction with kindergarten children, and 4) involvement in play activities of kindergarten children. The experimental group of fifth grade students (N=12) received thirty-five minutes of training twice a week for 5 weeks and then once a week for the duration of the 10 weeks of play sessions. The control group (N=11) received no training during the 15 weeks of the project. Fifth grade student participants were videotaped playing with a kindergarten child identified as having adjustment difficulties in 20-minute play sessions before and after the training to measure empathic behavior in adult-child interactions. Analysis ...
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The Fifth Humor: Ink, Texts, and the Early Modern Body

The Fifth Humor: Ink, Texts, and the Early Modern Body

Date: December 2012
Creator: Polster, Kristen Kayem
Description: This dissertation tracks the intimate relationship between writing and the body to add new dimensions to humoral criticism and textual studies of Renaissance literature. Most humor theory focuses on the volatile, permeable nature of the body, and its vulnerability to environmental stimuli, neglecting the important role that written texts play in this economy of fluids. I apply the principles of humor theory to the study of handwritten and printed texts. This approach demonstrates that the textual economy of the period—reading, writing, publishing, exchanging letters, performing all of the above on stage—mirrors the economy of fluids that governed the humoral body. Early modern readers and writers could imagine textual activities not only as cerebral, abstract concepts, but also as sexual activities, as processes of ingestion and regurgitation. My study of ink combines humoral, historical materialist, and ecocritical modes of study. Materialist critics have examined the quill, paper, and printing press as metaphors for the body; however, the ink within them remains unexamined. This dissertation infuses the figurative body of the press with circulating passions, and brings to bear the natural, biochemical properties that ink lends to the texts it creates. Considering the influence of written and printed materials on the body ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries