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Parent Responses to the Birth and Rearing of a Child with Down Syndrome : The Application of Engel's 3-stage Theoretical Model of Grieving

Parent Responses to the Birth and Rearing of a Child with Down Syndrome : The Application of Engel's 3-stage Theoretical Model of Grieving

Date: August 1995
Creator: Smith, Jenette L.
Description: The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) To analyze the similarities and differences between parent responses to the birth and rearing of a child with Down syndrome and; 2) To document the characteristics of grieving described in Engel's 3-stage model of grieving. A questionnaire was used to assess responses from randomly chosen parent members of the Dallas Down Syndrome Guild. Qualitative data analysis was conducted, using the methodology of triangulation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Parent, Student, and Faculty Satisfaction With and Support of Campus Laboratory School Programs

Parent, Student, and Faculty Satisfaction With and Support of Campus Laboratory School Programs

Date: May 2001
Creator: Seo, Hyunnam
Description: The primary purpose of the study was to investigate stakeholders' opinions concerning campus laboratory school program quality in three areas: (1) quality of teacher education, (2) research, and (3) childcare. There were 653 participants in the study: 246 parents whose children were enrolled in laboratory schools, 200 pre-service students who were taking early childhood or child development classes, and 207 faculty who were associated with campus laboratory schools. The study participants came from 122 campus children centers in the United States. These campus centers were members of either the National Coalition for Campus Children's Centers (NCCCC) or the National Organization of Laboratory Schools (NOLS). The first three research questions investigated whether parents, students, and faculty were satisfied with program quality. A one-way analysis of variance indicated a statistically significant mean difference between the three groups. The parents had a higher mean level of program quality satisfaction than students and faculty. The last three research questions investigated whether parents, students, and faculty supported the ongoing existence of campus laboratory school programs. Opinions were scaled from 1=not ever to 5=definitely. The overall mean ratings for Parents (4.54), students (4.18), and faculty (4.07) indicated that they supported the ongoing existence of campus laboratory ...
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Parent-Toddler Training:  The Merits of Further Analysis

Parent-Toddler Training: The Merits of Further Analysis

Date: May 2011
Creator: Cermak, Samantha Marie
Description: Earlier identification of autism allows for interventions to begin during toddlerhood. Literature suggests that parents are an important part of very early intervention and specific goals have indicated that they are important to progress. The use of telemedicine may increase access to interventions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate a parent-toddler training program that targeted social-communication skills and incorporated a telemedicine component. Measures included parent teaching targets, child attending, vocal requesting, and coordinated joint attention and the parent's response to coordinated joint attention. Results indicate that parent teaching increased, child attending and vocalizations increased, child coordinated joint attention increased, and the parent's response to coordinated joint attention was primarily social in nature. Analysis of the home observations indicates that direct in home observations or teleconference observations neither under or overestimated behaviors. The results are discussed in the context of teaching and feedback delivery and selection of teaching targets.
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Parental Attitudes and Adjustment of Mentally Retarded Children

Parental Attitudes and Adjustment of Mentally Retarded Children

Date: 1963
Creator: Oualline, Viola Jackson
Description: The purpose of this investigation was to discover the relationship between parental attitudes and the adjustment of the mentally retarded child.
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Parental bonding, adult romantic attachment, fear of intimacy, and cognitive distortions among child molesters.

Parental bonding, adult romantic attachment, fear of intimacy, and cognitive distortions among child molesters.

Date: August 2007
Creator: Wood, Eric
Description: Path models assessed different models of influential order for parental bonding; adult romantic attachment; views of self, world/others, and the future; the fear of intimacy; and cognitive distortions among child molesters and non-offending controls. Child molesters receiving sex offender treatment reported more problematic parental bonding; insecure adult romantic attachment; negative views of self, world/others, and the future; a greater fear of intimacy, and more cognitive distortions regarding adult-child sex. The predicted path models were not established as the models did not adequately fit the data. However, post hoc logistic regressions indicated that Maternal Optimal Bonding, Preoccupied attachment, and cognitive distortions regarding adult-child sex significantly predicted child molester status. Overall, the findings provide support for a multi-factorial model of child molestation derived from attachment theory. Limitations of the study and areas for future research are also discussed.
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Parental decision-making regarding their child's participation in a middle-school talent search.

Parental decision-making regarding their child's participation in a middle-school talent search.

Date: May 2005
Creator: Ray, Janet
Description: The present study sought to identify variables that predicted parental decision-making regarding their child's participation in a national gifted and talented identification program for middle school students and subsequent participation in recommended educational options. One hundred sixty-nine parents of students who qualified for either the 2001-2002 or 2002-2003 Duke Talent Identification Program participated in the study. The students were drawn from two large public school districts and six small private schools in a large metropolitan area in the southwestern United States. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to identify the variables predictive of parental decision-making regarding talent search participation. Each parent completed a questionnaire consisting of both multiple-choice and open-ended questions. Selected parents participated in structured follow-up interviews. The results of the study indicated that parental perception of the helpfulness of school personnel in explaining the purpose and process of the talent search was most predictive of participation in the talent search. The educational level of the father, parent's prior awareness of the purpose and process of talent search, and the number of enrichment activities in which the child had previously participated were also predictive of talent search participation. Qualitative data indicated that parents of both participants and nonparticipants ...
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Parental Influence on Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Parental Influence on Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Date: December 2006
Creator: Didehbani, Nyaz
Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate parental influence on treatment progression in children with feeding disorders. Children diagnosed with a feeding disorder were recruited with their parents at the Children's House at Baylor (N=22; 11 boys, 11 girls). Caloric intake was recorded daily as outcome measures of treatment progression. It was hypothesized that the initial parental participation would delay the child's progress as measured by caloric intake. Patient's average caloric intake (measured in grams) for 3 days prior to parents entering the room was compared to the average caloric intake measured for 3 days after the parents entered the room. A paired t-test was performed on the averaged caloric intake three days pre and post-parental presence, yielding significant results: t(21) = 3.17, p = .005. Caloric intake was greater prior to parent involvement (M = 811.17) as compared to after the parent entered the room (M = 704.88).
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Parental Perception of Satisfaction and Understanding of Special Education Services

Parental Perception of Satisfaction and Understanding of Special Education Services

Date: May 2008
Creator: Livingstone, Elisabeth
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the satisfaction and understanding of parents of young children with disabilities in North Texas in regard to the special education services they receive through their local education authority. A mixed non-experimental research design utilizing the survey method was used to obtain the data collected from a sample of 230 parents with children with disabilities from preschool to elementary ages. Factorial analysis techniques were first used to assess the validity of the 14 quantitative items by splitting the sample into 2 equivalent groups: the development group and the validation group. Exploratory factor analysis extracted 2 factors after eliminating 4 items: satisfaction and understanding. This 2-factor structure was confirmed in the validation group. The final 10-item survey demonstrated satisfactory reliability and validity. Overall, parents were very satisfied with the special education services and reported a good understanding of those services. Two x two (number of children x years of services) ANOVAs were used to examine the differences on parental satisfaction and understanding. No statistically significant differences were found except that parents with 2 or 3 children were more satisfied than the counterparts with only 1 child in the special education program. This difference was ...
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Parental Portrayals in Children's Literature: 1900-2000

Parental Portrayals in Children's Literature: 1900-2000

Date: August 2005
Creator: DeWitt, Amy L.
Description: The portrayals of mothers and fathers in children's literature as companions, disciplinarians, caregivers, nurturers, and providers were documented in this research. The impact of time of publication, sex of author, award-winning status of book, best-selling status of book, race of characters, and sex of characters upon each of the five parental roles was assessed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation, and multinomial logistic regression techniques. A survey instrument developed for this study was completed for each of the 300 books randomly selected from the list of easy/picture books in the Children's Catalog (H.W. Wilson Company, 2001). To ensure all time periods were represented, the list was stratified by decades before sampling. It was expected that parental role portrayals would become more egalitarian and less traditional in each successive time period of publication. Male authors were expected to portray more egalitarian parental roles, and the race and sex of the young characters were not expected to influence parental portrayals. Award-winning books were expected to represent more egalitarian parental roles. Books that achieved the Publisher's Weekly all-time best-selling status were expected to portray parents in less egalitarian roles. Secondary analyses explored the prevalence of mothers' occupations, parental incompetence, and dangerous, solo child adventures. While ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Parental Rights: Curriculum Opt-outs in Public Schools

Parental Rights: Curriculum Opt-outs in Public Schools

Date: August 2010
Creator: Rogers, Tommy Kevin
Description: The purposes of this dissertation were to determine the constitutional rights of parents to shield their children from exposure to parts of the public school curriculum that the parents find objectionable on religious, moral, or other grounds and to determine the statutory rights of parents to remove, or opt-out, their children from objectionable parts or all of the public school curriculum as set forth in the statutes of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Many pivotal federal court cases dealing with parent rights and curricular issues, including Mozert v. Hawkins County Board of Education (1987), Vandiver v. Hardin County Board of Education (1987), Brown v. Hot, Sexy, & Safer Productions, Inc. (1995), Leebaert v. Harrington (2003), and Parker v. Hurley (2008) were surveyed using legal research methods. Specific types of curriculum opt-outs (e.g., sex education, comprehensive health programs, HIV/AIDS instruction) granted by each state were ascertained. States' statutes and regulations were categorized as non-existent, restrictive, or permissive based on the scope and breadth of each state's curriculum opt-out statute or regulation. A long list of federal court rulings have provided public schools the right to teach what school boards and administrators determine is appropriate. Parents did not have ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries