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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of History
 Degree Discipline: History
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The Brazos Valley Groundwater Conservation District: A Case Study in Texas Groundwater Conservation

The Brazos Valley Groundwater Conservation District: A Case Study in Texas Groundwater Conservation

Date: August 2011
Creator: Teel, Katherine
Description: This thesis examines the history of groundwater management through the development of groundwater conservation districts in Texas. Political, economic, ideological, and scientific understandings of groundwater and its regulation varied across the state, as did the natural resource types and quantities, which created a diverse and complicated position for lawmakers and landowners. Groundwater was consistently interpreted as a private property right and case law protected unrestricted use for the majority of the twentieth-century even as groundwater resources crossed property and political boundaries, and water tables declined particularly during the second-half of the century. The case study of the Brazos Valley Groundwater Conservation District describes the complicated history of groundwater in Texas as the state attempted to balance natural resource legislation and private property rights and illuminate groundwater’s importance for the future.
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The Break-up of the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Army, 1865

The Break-up of the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Army, 1865

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Clampitt, Brad R.
Description: Unlike other Confederate armies at the conclusion of the Civil War, General Edmund Kirby Smith's Trans-Mississippi Army disbanded, often without orders, rather than surrender formally. Despite entreaties from military and civilian leaders to fight on, for Confederate soldiers west of the Mississippi River, the surrender of armies led by Generals Robert E. Lee and Joseph E. Johnston ended the war. After a significant decline in morale and discipline throughout the spring of 1865, soldiers of the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department chose to break-up and return home. As compensation for months of unpaid service, soldiers seized both public and private property. Civilians joined the soldiers to create disorder that swept many Texas communities until the arrival of Federal troops in late June.
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British and Indian Influences in the Identities and Literature of Mark Tully and Ruskin Bond

British and Indian Influences in the Identities and Literature of Mark Tully and Ruskin Bond

Date: August 2003
Creator: Lakhani, Brenda
Description: With globalization and modernization, increasingly people are influenced by multiple cultures. This paper examines the case of two authors, Mark Tully and Ruskin Bond, who were born in India shortly before India's Independence (1947). Both had British parents, but one considers himself Indian while the other has retained his British identity. The focus of this paper is how and why this difference has occurred and how it has influenced their writing. Both Tully and Bond write short stories about India and Indians, particularly the small towns and villages. Their reasons for writing, however, are very different. Tully writes to achieve social change, while Bond writes because he loves to write.
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British Labour Government Policy in Iraq, 1945-1950

British Labour Government Policy in Iraq, 1945-1950

Date: December 2012
Creator: Alburaas, Theyab
Description: Britain during the Labour government's administration took a major step toward developing Iraq primarily due to the decision of Ernest Bevin, the Foreign Minister, to start a new British policy toward the Iraqi regimes that would increase the British influence in the area. This led to Bevin's strategy of depending on guiding the Iraqi regime to make economic and political reforms that would lead to social justice.
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The British-Loyalist Strategy to Recover the Southern Provinces During the American Revolution

The British-Loyalist Strategy to Recover the Southern Provinces During the American Revolution

Date: August 1966
Creator: Griffin, Roger Allen
Description: This thesis examines the efforts of the British loyalists in Georgia and the Carolinas to assist the British army bring the southern provinces back under royal control. These efforts and a judgment of the reasonableness of the trust in the zeal and strength of the southern loyalists are the subjects of this study.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
British Opponents of the Great War

British Opponents of the Great War

Date: January 1969
Creator: Odom, Sue Kirby
Description: The intensely divided but vocal minority that denounced Great Britain's declaration of war in 1914 and decried Britain's continuance in the war illustrated both the strengths and weaknesses of their nation's politics and the impotence of dissent against a majority united in arms.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
British Prime Minister Tony Blair's Decision to Go to War in Iraq: An Evaluation of Motivating Factors

British Prime Minister Tony Blair's Decision to Go to War in Iraq: An Evaluation of Motivating Factors

Date: May 2009
Creator: LaCoco, Kimberly
Description: Blair sent British troops to join U.S. forces in the invasion of Iraq in 2003 at great political cost to himself. What motivated him to take this step? Sources for this work include: autobiographies and biographies of individuals close to Blair; journal and newspaper articles and monographs on this topic; Prime Minister's speeches and press conferences. Part one is comprised of five chapters including the Introduction; Blair's years at school; Blair's early political career; and From Parliament to Prime Minister. Part two includes four chapters that analyze motivating factors such as, Anglo-American Relations; Blair's personality, faith, and his relationship with Gordon Brown; and finally, Blair's perception of Britain's Manifest Destiny. All of these factors played a role in Blair's decision.
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British Reactions to the Sepoy Mutiny, 1857-1858

British Reactions to the Sepoy Mutiny, 1857-1858

Date: August 1970
Creator: Shafeeq, Samuel
Description: English and Indian historians have devoted considerable research and analysis to the genesis of the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857 but have ignored contemporary British reaction to it, a neglect which this study attempts to satisfy.
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Broadsides of Ink : A Study of the Controversies About the Battle of Jutland

Broadsides of Ink : A Study of the Controversies About the Battle of Jutland

Date: August 1973
Creator: Summers, Herbert Roland
Description: This thesis is an analysis of the arguments over the major questions about the Battle of Jutland. These questions include ones on naval strategy, tactics, materiel, and the effect of the battle.
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Burying the War Hatchet: Spanish-Comanche Relations in Colonial Texas, 1743-1821

Burying the War Hatchet: Spanish-Comanche Relations in Colonial Texas, 1743-1821

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Lipscomb, Carol A.
Description: This dissertation provides a history of Spanish-Comanche relations during the era of Spanish Texas. The study is based on research in archival documents, some newly discovered. Chapter 1 presents an overview of events that brought both people to the land that Spaniards named Texas. The remaining chapters provide a detailed account of Spanish-Comanche interaction from first contact until the end of Spanish rule in 1821. Although it is generally written that Spaniards first met Comanches at San Antonio de BĂ©xar in 1743, a careful examination of Spanish documents indicates that Spaniards heard rumors of Comanches in Texas in the 1740s, but their first meeting did not occur until the early 1750s. From that first encounter until the close of the Spanish era, Spanish authorities instituted a number of different policies in their efforts to coexist peacefully with the Comanche nation. The author explores each of those policies, how the Comanches reacted to those policies, and the impact of that diplomacy on both cultures. Spaniards and Comanches negotiated a peace treaty in 1785, and that treaty remained in effect, with varying degrees of success, for the duration of Spanish rule. Leaders on both sides were committed to maintaining that peace, although ...
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