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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of English
Lining Up
A creative, multi-genre collection that includes three personal essays (non-fiction) and two short stories (fiction). The pieces in this collection primarily focus on the themes of loneliness and waiting. It includes pieces dealing with homosexual relationships, friendships and heterosexual relationships. Collection includes the essays "The Line," "Why We Don't Talk about Christmas," and "Boys Who Kiss Back," and includes the short stories "I Am Allowed to Say Faggot" and "Dear Boy." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3683/
The List
The List is a collection of short stories focusing on the inability to adapt, or learn from self-destructive patterns, and the bizarre ways people reach out for one another when they don't know what else to do. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12171/
Literary and Realistic Influences upon the Women of the Spectator
This study will outline the two great literary genres of character-writing and satire, upon the tradition and practice of which Joseph Addison and Richard Steele based their characters of women in the Spectator. The three-fold purpose of this study is to determine how the Spectator was influenced by, and what it in turn contributed to, the two literary genres, the "Character" of women and satire on women; and to present the social status of the female audience as it existed and as the Spectator sought to improve it. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130294/
The Literary Criticism of H. L. Mencken
The thesis of this paper is that Mencken was a better critic than he is credited with being, that he was unusually discerning in his judgment of the fiction of his time, and that his criteria are clearly stated in various of his writings. It is conceded, however, that his taste in poetry was limited and that his contribution to dramatic criticism was not? greatly significant. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131345/
The Literary Theory of Ayn Rand
The author believes that Ayn Rand presents a systematic approach to aesthetics and that her work presents an interesting and significant approach to aesthetic problems. The author will attempt to present Ayn Rand's basic aesthetic concepts that throw light on her literary theory. The author will also present her views on literary schools and of individual authors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131049/
Literature in the Age of Science: Technology and Scientists in the Mid-Twentieth Century Works of Isaac Asimov, John Barth, Arthur C. Clarke, Thomas Pynchon, and Kurt Vonnegut
This study explores the depictions of technology and scientists in the literature of five writers during the 1960s. Scientists and technology associated with nuclear, computer, and space science are examined, focusing on their respective treatments by the following writers: John Barth, Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, Isaac Asimov, and Arthur C. Clarke. Despite the close connections between the abovementioned sciences, space science is largely spared from negative critiques during the sixties. Through an analysis of Barth's Giles Goat-boy, Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle, Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Asimov's short stories "Key Item," "The Last Question," "The Machine That Won the War," "My Son, the Physicist," and Clarke's 2001: A Space Odyssey, it is argued that altruistic goals of space science during the 1960s protect it from the satirical treatments that surround the other sciences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc30511/
The Little Weird: Self and Consciousness in Contemporary, Small-press, Speculative Fiction
This dissertation explores how contemporary, small-press, speculative fiction deviates from other genres in depicting the processes of consciousness in narrative. I study how the confluence of contemporary cognitive theory and experimental, small-press, speculative fiction has produced a new narrative mode, one wherein literature portrays not the product of consciousness but its process instead. Unlike authors who worked previously in the stream-of-consciousness or interior monologue modes, writers in this new narrative mode (which this dissertation refers to as "the little weird") use the techniques of recursion, narratological anachrony, and Ulric Neisser's "ecological self" to avoid the constraints of textual linearity that have historically prevented other literary modes from accurately portraying the operations of "self." Extrapolating from Mieke Bal's seminal theory of narratology; Tzvetan Todorov's theory of the fantastic; Daniel C. Dennett's theories of consciousness; and the works of Darko Suvin, Robert Scholes, Jean Baudrillard, and others, I create a new mode not for classifying categories of speculative fiction, but for re-envisioning those already in use. This study, which concentrates on the work of progressive, small-press, speculative writers such as Kelly Link, Forrest Aguirre, George Saunders, Jeffrey Ford, China Miéville, and many others, explores new ideas about narrative "coherence" from the points of view of self as they are presented today by cognitive, narratological, psychological, sociological, and semiotic theories. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3703/
Lord Byron's Attitude Toward Napoleon
This thesis is significant for the knowledge it offers concerning the influence of Napoleon Bonaparte's personality and career upon the character and the work of Lord Byron. It is significant because of the light it throws on both Napoleon and the culture of Europe during his era. This study is significant in the insight it indirectly gives into the psychological phenomenon of hero-worship, to which it gives a more universal application through the medium of Byron's attitude toward Napoleon. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130488/
Lord Byron's Interest in British Politics
The purpose of this thesis is to examine the politics of Byron as they are related to his age. Necessarily, a part of this work will deal with ideas that are somewhat conjectural, largely because of the limitations of time and space as well as the lack of accurate information--particularly that which concerns Byron and the Whig circle. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108234/
Lord Byron's Self-Portrayal in Don Juan
The purpose of this thesis is not to divide and subdivide the various aspects of the personality of Lord Byron, but to record and comment upon what the poet had to say about himself. The work which most easily lends itself to this type of study is the masterpiece Don Juan. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130553/
Love and Death in the Fiction of J. D. Salinger
This thesis explores the themes love and death in the fiction writing of J. D. Salinger. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108168/
Love Poem with Exiles
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Love Poem with Exiles is a collection of poems with a critical preface. The poems are varied in terms of subject matter and form. In the critical preface, I discuss my relationship with poetry as well as the idea that we inherit poems, and that if we are inspired by them, we can transform them into something new. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc28465/
Lowell's Opinion of His Contemporaries
This thesis examines the criticisms written by James Russell Lowell about his contemporaries. In addition, the author tries to record the reasons behind Lowell's opinions, when those reasons can be ascertained. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70326/
Luke's Mama
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A creative nonfiction thesis, Luke's Mama is a memoir of personal essays that explore how the birth of my son has affected the ways that I relate within and interpret different areas of my life. Chapter I, Introduction, identifies personal and ethical concerns involved in telling my story and explores how others have handled similar issues. Chapter II, Family, illustrates how my relationship with my family of origin has changed since I've become a parent and also how my new family and I interact with society. Chapter III, Calling, depicts my struggle in finding a balance between work and family priorities. Chapter IV, Partner, presents a contrast between my relationship with my partner before and after my son's birth. Chapter V, Parent, displays the beginning of my ever-growing relationship with my son and sense of parenthood. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2845/
Macaulay and Carlyle, a Study in Victorian Contrasts
Discusses the contrasts apparent in the Victorian era British writers Carlyle and Macaulay with reference to history, biography, and literary criticism. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70260/
"Mad Mary Sane" and Other Stories
The following is a multi-genre collection, including short shorts, short fiction, non-fiction, and drama. Each piece utilizes Gothic motifs and dark comedy in an effort to explore life and loss. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5254/
Madness in Elizabethan Drama
Insanity, which has long been a favorite theme of Elizabethan drama, summoned the dramatist's imagination to wonderful creations -- creations that were fantastic and grotesque, but unforgettable. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83635/
The Man-Nature Dialogue in the Poetry of Robert Frost
The purpose of this thesis is to examine Robert Frost's use in his poetry of ambivalent views of nature, of varieties of human character, and of interrelationships between man and nature. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130632/
The Man of Law's Tale and its Analogues
This thesis examines Chaucer's "The Man of Law's Tale" from the "Canterbury Tales," and includes a comparison of the narrative treatment of Chaucer's, Gower's and Trivet's tales of Constance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107856/
The Map and the Territory in the Poetry of Wallace Stevens
In this dissertation, Wallace Stevens' imagination-reality problem as depicted in his poetry is discussed in terms of an eco-critical map-territory divide. Stevens's metaphor of "the necessary angel" acts to mediate human necessity, the map, with natural necessity, the territory, in order to retain contact with changing cultural and environmental conditions. At stake in this mediation are individual freedom and the pertinence of the imagination to the experience of reality. In Chapter 2, the attempt at reconciliation of these two necessities will be described in terms of surrealism. Stevens's particular approach to surrealism emphasizes separating and delineating natural necessity from human necessity so that through the poem the reader can experience the miracle of their reconciliation. In Chapter 3, this delineation of the two necessities, map and territory, will be examined against Modernist "decreation," which is the stripping bare of human perception for the purpose of regaining glimpses of the first idea of the external world. And in Chapter 4, Stevens's approach to the problem of the map-territory divide will be considered against his alienation or internal exile: balancing nature and identity through mediating fictions results in a compromised approach to the marriage of mind and culture in a historically situated place. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12205/
Maria Edgeworth as a Precursor of Realism
The purpose of this thesis is to study the novels of Maria Edgeworth in an attempt to discover whether or not her novels have merit beyond their representation of the manners and morals of her historical period. This involves first an examination of her novels in the light of such criticism as has given rise to the question of their importance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130445/
Marital Traditions in the Fiction of Edith Wharton
This study deals, with Edith Wharton's literary attitude toward woman's limited place in society and her opportunities for happiness in acceptance of or rebellion against conventional standards. Wharton's works, specifically her novels, contain recurrent character types functioning in recurrent situations. Similarity in the themes of Wharton's various works illustrates her basic idea: woman, lacking independence and identity, needs the security of tradition's order. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163994/
Mark Twain as a Literary Critic
The purpose of this thesis is to present essays and letters in which Mark Twain discussed the art of writing or assumed the role of a literary critic. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130335/
Mark Twain as a Political Satirist
This thesis discusses Mark Twain as a political satirist in Nevada and during the Gilded Age. There are also chapters covering Politics and Slavery, Democracy and Monarchy, as well as Imperialism and War. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130330/
Mark Twain as a Social Critic
The author attempts to show in this thesis that Mark Twain was a serious observer and critic of life. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75386/
Mark Twain's Representation of the American West
The purpose of this paper is to picture the West as Mark Twain saw it. Many books have been written which describe Twain's Western years, but few have given much consideration to the accuracy of his account of the West in the 1860's. This paper attempts to portray Twain not only as a social and political satirist, but also as a possible historical satirist. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130316/
Mark Twain's Victorian Conversation in the Elizabethan Manner
The thesis presents Mark Twain's 1601 in the form of a new edition comprising a critical analysis, a photographic copy of the only authorized text of the work, and a glossary. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131362/
Mark Twain's Views on Formal Education
The purpose of this study is to discuss Twain's role as a critic of the educational system of his day and to explore his views concerning the purposes, methodology, and value of formal education below the college level. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130657/
Martha Gellhorn and Ernest Hemingway: A Literary Relationship
Martha Gellhorn and Ernest Hemingway met in Key West in 1937, married in 1941, and divorced in 1945. Gellhorn's work exhibits a strong influence from Hemingway's work, including collaboration on her work during their marriage. I will discuss three of her six novels: WMP (1934), Liana (1944), and Point of No Return (1948). The areas of influence that I will rely on in many ways follow the stages Harold Bloom outlines in Anxiety of Influence. Gellhorn's work exposes a stage of influence that Bloom does not describe-which I term collaborative. By looking at Hemingway's influence in Gellhorn's writing the difference between traditional literary influence and collaborative influence can be compared and analyzed, revealing the footprints left in a work by a collaborating author as opposed to simply an influential one. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4183/
Mary Austin's Contribution to the Culture of the Southwest
An examination of Mary Austin's works and how she contributed to the culture of the Southwest. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75529/
Mary/merry and horse/hoarse: Mergers in Southern American English
Phonetic mergers in American English have been studied throughout the last half century. Previous research has contributed social and phonetic explanations to the understanding of front and back vowel mergers before /l/, front vowel mergers before nasals and phonetically unconditioned back vowel mergers. Using data from the Linguistic Atlas of the Gulf States (LAGS) and the Linguistic Atlas of the Middle and South Atlantic States (LAMSAS), this thesis examines the spread of the front vowel mergers in Mary and merry and the back vowel mergers in horse and hoarse. The two complementary sources of data allow for a social and phonetic approach to the examination of the merger. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4523/
Mask-Veil Imagery in Hawthorne's Fiction
The purpose of this study is to determine, by a chronological review, the evolution of the mask-veil symbol as a device in Hawthorne's fiction and to ascertain its relevancy as a concrete manifestation of the abstract idea it betokens. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131185/
A Matter of Life and Death: The Continuity of Identity in the Fiction of Edgar Allan Poe
Some of the most interesting facets of Edgar Allan Poe's fiction are his imaginative speculations concerning the metaphysical experiences of the soul, the individual psychic "identity." His interest focuses primarily on three related aspects of the soul's experiences (1) metempsychosis (or reincarnation and transmigration); (2) suspension between "death" and the after-life or states of unconsciousness and consciousness, sleep and waking; and (3) the terrors, real or imagined, of premature burial. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163999/
The Maturing Emotion of George Eliot
This study has been made in an attempt to illustrate how the genius that was George Eliot developed, how a magnificent intellect was driven first to achievement by emotional frustration and then was coupled with emotional maturity in person, developing emotional maturity in the creative artist and producing at last the supreme and delicate balance of intellectual and emotional maturity in the philosopher who found her medium in creative art. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75470/
Medievalism in Shakespeare
This study will undertake to point out only a few of the many medieval elements used by Shakespeare. It does not purport to do more than to examine briefly a small number of the myriad medieval traits to be found in Shakespeare's writing nor to cite more than a few examples of these traits in a limited number of his plays. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108208/
Melville's Vision of Society : A Study of the Paradoxical Interrelations in Melville's Major Novels
I hold that Melvillean society consists of paradoxical relationships between civilization and barbarianism, evil and good, the corrupt and the natural, the individual and the collective, and the primitive and the advanced. Because these terms are arbitrary and, in the context of the novels, somewhat interchangeable, I explore Melville's thoughts as those emerge in the following groups of novels: Typee, Omoo, and White-Jacket demonstrate the paradox of Melvillean society; Redburn, Moby-Dick, and Mardi illustrate the corrupting effects of capitalism and individualism; and The Confidence-Man, Israel Potter, and Pierre depict a collapsed paradox and the disintegration of Melville's society. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278456/
Meniscus
Meniscus is a collection of poems with a critical preface that examines the nature of "silence" and oblique language. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3685/
The Messenger in Shakespeare
The messenger genus is a broad one. It contains several species and sub-species, some of which will hardly seem to belong to the group until they are examined from a functional or structural standpoint. An attempt will be made to break this great group into three species. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130421/
Metamorphosis: William Faulkner's Incorporation of Short Stories into Longer Narratives
This study analyzes these stories in their original and later forms, both to discover the types of changes Faulkner made and to determine whether or not he followed any pattern in the revisions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108116/
Metaphors, Myths, and Archetypes: Equal Paradigmatic Functions in Human Cognition?
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The overview of contributions to metaphor theory in Chapters 1 and 2, examined in reference to recent scholarship, suggests that the current theory of metaphor derives from long-standing traditions that regard metaphor as a crucial process of cognition. This overview calls to attention the necessity of a closer inspection of previous theories of metaphor. Chapter 3 takes initial steps in synthesizing views of domains of inquiry into cognitive processes of the human mind. It draws from cognitive models developed in linguistics and anthropology, taking into account hypotheses put forth by psychologists like Jung. It sets the stage for an analysis that intends to further understanding of how the East-West dichotomy guides, influences, and expresses cognitive processes. Although linguist George Lakoff denies the existence of a connection between metaphors, myths, and archetypes, Chapter 3 illustrates the possibility of a relationship among these phenomena. By synthesizing theoretical approaches, Chapter 3 initiates the development of a model suitable for the analysis of the East-West dichotomy as exercised in Chapter 4. As purely emergent from bodily experience, however, neither the concept of the East nor the concept of the West can be understood completely. There exist cultural experiences that may, depending on historical and social context, override bodily experience inclined to favor the East over the West because of the respective connotations of place of birth of the sun and place of death of the sun. This kind of overriding cultural meaning is based on the “typical, frequently recurring and widely shared interpretations of some object, abstract entity, or event evoked in people as a result of similar experiences. To call these meanings ‘cultural meanings' is to imply that a different interpretation is evoked in people with different characteristic experiences. As such, various interpretations of the East-West image-schema exist simultaneously in mutually exclusive or competing forms, as the analysis of Gatsby and the reversal of the values of East and West in the context of colonizing and counter-colonizing attitudes suggests. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3284/
Metrical Analysis in Nineteenth-Century English Criticism of Shakespeare
It is the purpose of this study to resurrect and evaluate the most significant items of metrical analyses of Shakespeare's plays. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130751/
Mexico and Mexicans in the Fiction of Steinbeck, Morris, Traven and Porter
The purpose of this study is to investigate what seem to be the principal attitudes of Americans toward Mexico and Mexicans as expressed by four contemporary American authors, and to point out and evaluate salient features in their respective treatment of the subject. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130729/
Middle Men: Establishing Non-Anglo Masculinity in Southwestern Literature
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By examining southwestern masculinity from three separate lenses of cultural experience, Mexican American, Native American and female, this thesis aims to acknowledge the blending of masculinities that is taking place in both the fictitious and factual southwest. Long gone are the days when the cowboys chased down the savage Indians or the Mexican bandits. Southwestern literature now focuses on how these different cultures and traditions can re-construct their masculinities in a way that will be beneficial to all. The southwest is a land of borders and liminal spaces between the United States and Mexico, between brown and white, legal and illegal. All of these borders converge here to create the last American frontier. These converging borders also encompass converging traditions, cultures, and genders. By blending the cowboy, the macho, and the warrior, perhaps these Southwestern writers can construct a liminal masculinity more representative of the southwest itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4259/
Milton's Concept of God
This thesis explores Milton's concept of God and the controversies surrounding his treatise and doctrines. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108162/
The Mind's Eye and Other Stories
This collection contains a preface entitled "Of Other Worlds" and the following short stories: "The Mind's Eye," "Waking," "The Conquest of the World," "Persephone," and "Extradition." This creative thesis includes a blend of science fiction and literary realism short stories, which are collectively concerned with questions of time, narration, and the use of language. As well, the preface discusses science fiction theory, narrative strategies such as the use of the first person perspective, and the author's theory of composition. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67999/
Miscegenated Narration: The Effects of Interracialism in Women's Popular Sentimental Romances from the Civil War Years
Critical work on popular American women's fiction still has not reckoned adequately with the themes of interracialism present in these novels and with interracialism's bearing on the sentimental. This thesis considers an often overlooked body of women's popular sentimental fiction, published from 1860-1865, which is interested in themes of interracial romance or reproduction, in order to provide a fuller picture of the impact that the intersection of interracialism and sentimentalism has had on American identity. By examining the literary strategy of "miscegenated narration," or the heteroglossic cacophony of narrative voices and ideological viewpoints that interracialism produces in a narrative, I argue that the hegemonic ideologies of the sentimental romance are both "deterritorialized" and "reterritorialized," a conflicted impulse that characterizes both nineteenth-century sentimental, interracial romances and the broader project of critiquing the dominant national narrative that these novels undertake. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67958/
Money in Four of the Early Novels of Henry James
The purpose of the study at hand is to follow up the suggestions in Winters's observations and Booth's thesis, and to examine both the extent and the nature of money and other financial considerations as these matters appear in the four most important novels of James's early period. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130759/
"Money Only Pays for It" and other stories.
This thesis includes a novel of eight short stories and a critical preface. The preface begins with a section placing the stories in their literary historical context in regards to masculinity theory. It goes on to discuss the craft of fictionalizing autobiographical stories. Finally, the preface talks about the choice of a first person narrator. Each of the stories should stand alone, though they follow the narrator's life for a number of years. Todd Welles is the narrator of all the stories, with the exception of a few. In the stories where Todd does not do all of the narration, he is interrupted by the narration of his "friend," Percy 2 Hard Welles, III. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4619/
The Monomythic Pattern in Three Novels by D. H. Lawrence
Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, and Women in Love present sequentially in fictional version Lawrence's own personal journey into self-discovery in the form of a creation myth of sensual love which repeats the archetypal patterns of some of the great mythologies. It is the purpose of the following pages to show how these three novels reveal the major archetypal patterns of mythology as suggested by Joseph Campbell in his study, The Hero with A Thousand Faces. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131004/
The Monstrance: A Collection of Poems
These poems deconstruct Mary Shelley's monster from a spiritually Chthonian, critically post-structuralist creative stance. But the process here is not simple disruption of the original discourse; this poetry cycle transforms the monster's traditional body, using what pieces are left from reception/vivisection to reconstruct, through gradual accretion, new authority for each new form, each new appendage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277686/