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 Degree Discipline: English
How to Factor Loss

How to Factor Loss

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Hall, Todd R.
Description: How to Factor Loss is a collection of poems and translations prefaced by a critical paper over Robert Hass's “Meditation at Lagunitas.” The preface, “A Sensuous Theory, A Sensuous Poem,” explores how Hass merges the discourses of theory and poetry to create a poem that hangs suspended between a confidence and an anxiety about language. The poems in this thesis are primarily responses to finitude. The first section turns toward an “other” as a strategy of placating desire and of reaching both inward and outward. The second section explores the potential failures of art as a means of touching objects. The final section acknowledges that finitude is the condition of humankind, and it turns toward a more tender language, one that embraces limitations and is filled with something like faith. The collection is followed by an appendix which contains translations of several poems by René Guy Cadou and Georg Trakl.
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Howard Roark as Hero

Howard Roark as Hero

Date: June 1965
Creator: Coffman, Sue Evelyn
Description: This study will be an investigation of character, therefore an investigation of the salient characters which have stirred the interest that has made Ayn Rand such a popular novelist.
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The Human Body is Not Designed for Ambivalence: Odes

The Human Body is Not Designed for Ambivalence: Odes

Date: December 2007
Creator: Walker, Tammy
Description: The critical analysis section of this dissertation seeks to define the ode using examples in translation from Greek and Latin odes and examples in English written from the 1500s to the 2000s. Although most definitions of the ode contend that this subgenre of the lyric is an occasional poem of praise that includes a meditative or mythological element, the ode is far more complex. An ode is an occasional poem, but it works to privilege rather than strictly praise its subject, allowing for the speaker's ambivalence toward the subject. Meditation is a key element of the ode, since the poet uses the subject as a means for moving to the meditation or as a conduit through which the meditation occurs. The meditation in the poem is also a way for the poet or speaker to negotiate the relationship between the subject and herself; thus, the ode is concerned with power, since the poet must place herself or the speaker in relation to the subject. Power thus may be granted to either the speaker or the subject; the poet names and speaks of the subject, and often the poet names and speaks of himself in relation to the subject. Additionally, odes ...
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Human Relationships in the Poetry of Robert Frost

Human Relationships in the Poetry of Robert Frost

Date: August 1969
Creator: Myers, Nancy B.
Description: Since the beginnings of recorded literature, authors have been most interested in the human situation, the relationships of mankind: man's struggle to accept himself and his life situation, to achieve harmony with his fellow man, to realize happiness with one of the opposite sex, and to seek answers to his relationship with his Creator. This thesis attempts to illustrate that Robert Frost was among those who found these the most significant themes for poetic expression.
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Humor in the Poetry of E.E. Cummings

Humor in the Poetry of E.E. Cummings

Date: June 1965
Creator: Mullen, Patrick Borden
Description: The present study will examine in detail the techniques and characteristics of the humor as manifested in the poems and place Cummings in proper perspective in the general tradition of American humor.
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Hunting and Fishing and Hemingway

Hunting and Fishing and Hemingway

Date: August 1964
Creator: Bryant, Ella
Description: Hunting and fishing made up a large part of the life of Ernest Hemingway, and these sports, in turn, frequently served as a means of communication for some of his most serious ideas.
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Iconoclast in the mirror.

Iconoclast in the mirror.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Alexander, Lydia L.
Description: This work explores identity positions of speakers in modern and contemporary poetry with respect to themes of subjectivity, self-awareness, lyricism, heteroglossia, and social contextualization, from perspectives including Bakhtinian, queer, feminist and postructuralist theories, and Peircian semiotics. Tony Hoagland, W.H. Auden, Adrienne Rich, and the poetic prose of Hélène Cixous provide textual examples of an evolving aesthetic in which the poet's self and world comprise multiple dynamic, open relationships supplanting one in which simple correspondences between signifiers and signifieds define selves isolated from the world. Hypertext and polyamory serve as useful analogies to the semantic eros characteristic of such poetry, including the collection of original poems that the critical portion of this thesis introduces.
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Idea of Natural Law in Milton's Comus and Paradise Lost

Idea of Natural Law in Milton's Comus and Paradise Lost

Date: May 1998
Creator: Koo, Youngwhoe
Description: This dissertation tries to locate Milton's optimistic view of man and nature as expressed in Comus, Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, and Paradise Lost in the long tradition of natural law that goes back to Aristotle, Cicero, and Aquinas.
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The Image of Germany in the Novels of Günter Grass

The Image of Germany in the Novels of Günter Grass

Date: January 1968
Creator: Boyar, Billy T.
Description: This thesis will attempt to scrutinize Günter Grass's message to his people and show his concern for the spiritual health of his country. Each of his three novels bears directly upon political, religious, and moral issues vital to Germany and to the world. The examination is based upon the assumption that Grass as an author is more concerned that Germans see themselves as they are and as they have been than he is concerned with the image of Germany which his novels present to the world. It is, paradoxically, this very special and sincere concern which gives his work universal appeal.
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Imagining The Reader: Vernacular Representation and Specialized Vocabulary in Medieval English Literature

Imagining The Reader: Vernacular Representation and Specialized Vocabulary in Medieval English Literature

Date: August 2000
Creator: Walther, James T.
Description: William Langland's The Vision of Piers Plowman was probably the first medieval English poem to achieve a national audience because Langland chose to write in the vernacular and he used the specialized vocabularies of his readership to open the poem to them. During the late thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, writers began using the vernacular in an attempt to allow all English people access to their texts. They did so consciously, indicating their intent in prologues and envois when they formally address readers. Some writers, like Langland and the author of Mankind, actually use representatives of the rural classes as primary characters who exhibit the beliefs and lives of the rural population. Anne Middleton's distinction between public-the readership an author imagined-and audience-the readership a work achieved-allows modern critics to discuss both public and audience and try to determine how the two differed. While the public is always only a presumption, the language in which an author writes and the cultural events depicted by the literature can provide a more plausible estimate of the public. The vernacular allowed authors like Gower, Chaucer, the author of Mankind, and Langland to use the specialized vocabularies of the legal and rural communities to discuss societal ...
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