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 Degree Discipline: English
Frustration and Quest in the Poems and Plays of T. S. Eliot

Frustration and Quest in the Poems and Plays of T. S. Eliot

Date: January 1969
Creator: Parker, Donald G.
Description: A careful examination of the creative writing of T. S. Eliot reveals that his poetry can be divided for purposed of consideration into two phases. The first phase refers to those poems written up to and including "The Hollow Men". These early poems can best be grouped together and characterized by the term frustration. The poetry of the second phase, written after "The Hollow Man," is dominated by and best considered in regard to a quest for the ideal.
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Functional Shift in English

Functional Shift in English

Date: 1951
Creator: Ousley, Emma Gene
Description: The purpose of this study will be to make an investigation of the shifting of a word from one part of speech to another, to see whether this linguistic process existed in Old English, Middle English, and to note the prevalence of functional shift among present-day writers.
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A Futile Quest for a Sustainable Relationship in Welty's Short Fiction

A Futile Quest for a Sustainable Relationship in Welty's Short Fiction

Date: May 2007
Creator: Lancaster, Daniel
Description: Eudora Welty is an author concerned with relationships between human beings. Throughout A Curtain of Green and Other Stories, The Wide Net and Other Stories, and The Golden Apples, Welty's characters search for ways in which to establish and sustain viable bonds. Particularly problematic are the relationships between opposite sexes. I argue that Welty uses communication as a tool for sustaining a relationship in her early work. I further argue that when her stories provide mostly negative outcomes, Welty moves on to a illuminate the possibility and subsequent failure of relationships via innocence in the natural world. Finally, Welty explores, through her characters, the attempt at marginalization and the quest for relationships outside the culture of the South.
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Gavin Stevens : Faulkners's Ubiquitous Knight

Gavin Stevens : Faulkners's Ubiquitous Knight

Date: August 1970
Creator: Williams, Georganna Moon
Description: In 1931 William Faulkner introduced to the scrutiny of the public eye one of his most admirable and delightful characters, and for the following three decades the history of Yoknapatawpha County was enriched and deepened by the appearance of this gentleman and man of words--Gavin Stevens. There has been no lack of critical attention given to Gavin Stevens and his role in Faulkner's stories and novels, and that criticism encompasses a variety of opinions, ranging anywhere from intelligent and sympathetic interpretation to unsympathetic rejection. With such an abundance of critical opinions and evaluations, perhaps justification for another piece of criticism on Stevens might best be stated in negative terms, in pointing out limitations in the criticism that already centers on Stevens.
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Gender and Desire in Thomas Lovell Beddoes'  The Brides' Tragedy and Death's Jest-Book

Gender and Desire in Thomas Lovell Beddoes' The Brides' Tragedy and Death's Jest-Book

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Rees, Shelley S.
Description: Thomas Lovell Beddoes' female dramatic characters are, for the most part, objectified and static, but these passive women perform a crucial narrative and thematic function in the plays. Alongside the destructive activity of the male characters, they dramatize masculine-feminine unions as idealized and contrived and, thus, unstable. Desire, power and influence, as well as the constrictive aspects of physicality, all become gendered concepts in Beddoes' plays, and socially normative relationships between men and women, including heterosexual courtship and marriage, are scrutinized and found wanting. In The Brides' Tragedy, Floribel and Olivia, the eponymous brides, represent archetypes of innocence, purity, and Romantic nature. Their bridegroom, Hesperus, embodies Romantic masculinity, desiring the feminine and aspiring to androgyny, but ultimately unable to relinquish masculine power. The consequences of Hesperus' attempts to unite with the feminine other are the destruction of that other and of himself, with no hope for the spiritual union in death that the Romantic Hesperus espouses as his ultimate desire. Death's Jest-Book expands upon the theme of male-female incompatibility, presenting heterosexual relationships in the context of triangulated desire. The erotic triangles created by Melveric, Sibylla, and Wolfram and Athulf, Amala, and Adalmar are inherently unstable, because they depend upon the ...
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The Gender of Time in the Eighteenth-century English Novel

The Gender of Time in the Eighteenth-century English Novel

Date: December 1998
Creator: Leissner, Debra Holt
Description: This study takes a structuralist approach to the development of the novel, arguing that eighteenth-century writers build progressive narrative by rendering abstract, then conflating, literary theories of gendered time that originate in the Renaissance with seventeenth-century scientific theories of motion. I argue that writers from the Renaissance through the eighteenth century generate and regulate progress-as-product in their narratives through gendered constructions of time that corresponded to the generation and regulation of economic, political, and social progress brought about by developing capitalism.
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Generosity and Gentillesse: Economic Exchange in Medieval English Romance

Generosity and Gentillesse: Economic Exchange in Medieval English Romance

Date: May 2011
Creator: Stewart, James T.
Description: This study explores how three English romances of the late fourteenth century-Geoffrey Chaucer's Franklin's Tale, Thomas Chestre's Sir Launfal, and the anonymous Sir Gawain and the Green Knight-employ economic exchange as a tool to illustrate community ideals. Although gift-giving and commerce are common motifs in medieval romance, these three romances depict acts of generosity and exchange that demonstrate fundamental principles of proper behavior by uniting characters in the poems in spite of social divisions such as gender or social class. Economic imagery in fourteenth-century romances merits particular consideration because of Richard II's prolific expenditure, which created such turbulence that the peasants revolted in 1381. The court's openhanded spending led to social unrest, but in romances a character's largesse strengthens community bonds by showing that all members of a group participate in an idealized gift economy. Positioned within the context of economic tensions, exchange in romances can lead readers to reexamine notions of group identity. Chestre's Sir Launfal unites its community under secular principles of economic exchange and evaluation. Using similar motifs of exchange, the Gawain-poet makes Christian and chivalric ideals apparent through Gawain's service and generosity to all those who follow the Christian faith. Further, Chaucer's Franklin's Tale portrays hospitality ...
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George Eliot and the Evangelical Mind

George Eliot and the Evangelical Mind

Date: August 1966
Creator: Jones, Jesse C.
Description: Gordon Haight, in his biographical preface to the letters of George Eliot, states the "without her intimate knowledge of the Evangelical mind George Eliot would have lacked part of the experience on which her wide sympathy was founded." This thesis is an exploration of, a commentary on, Haight's remark.
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George Eliot's Life and Philosophy as Reflected in Certain Characters of her Four Early Novels

George Eliot's Life and Philosophy as Reflected in Certain Characters of her Four Early Novels

Date: 1944
Creator: Morehead, Ella Watson
Description: The discussion in this thesis is designed to show reflections of George Eliot's life and philosophy in her four early novels: Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner, and Romola.
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George Washington Cable as a Critic of the South

George Washington Cable as a Critic of the South

Date: 1949
Creator: Donnelly, Willie Mae
Description: This thesis examines the work of writer George Washington Cable as it relates to the South. The focus is on the way Cable portrayed three types of people: the Southerner, the Creole, and the Negro.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries