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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Degree Discipline: Chemistry
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Investigation of the Pressure Dependence of SO3    Formation

Investigation of the Pressure Dependence of SO3 Formation

Date: December 2003
Creator: Naidoo, Jacinth
Description: The kinetics of the pressure dependent O + SO2 + Ar reaction have been investigated using laser photolysis resonance fluorescence at temperatures of 289 K, 399 K, 581 K, 699 K, 842 K and 1040 K and at pressures from 30-665 torr. Falloff was observed for the first time in the pressure dependence. Application of Lindemann theory yielded an Arrhenius expression of k(T) = 3.3 x 10-32exp(-992/T) cm6 molecule-1 s-1 for the low pressure limit and k(T) = 8.47 x 10-14exp(-468/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for the high pressure limit at temperatures between 289 and 842 K. The reaction is unusual as it possesses a positive activation energy at low temperature, yet at higher temperatures the activation energy is negative, illustrating a reaction barrier.
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Investigations of Thermochemistry and the Kinetics of H Atom Radical Reactions

Investigations of Thermochemistry and the Kinetics of H Atom Radical Reactions

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Date: December 2002
Creator: Peebles, Lynda Renee
Description: The thermochemistry of several species, and the kinetics of various H atom radical reactions relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry were investigated using ab initio theoretical techniques and the flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence technique. Using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations up to the G3 level of theory, the C-H bond strengths of several alkanes were calculated. The bond strengths were calculated using two working reactions. From the results, it is apparent that the bond strengths decrease as methyl groups are added to the central carbon. The results are in good agreement with recent experimental halogenation kinetic studies. Hydrogen bond strengths with sulfur and oxygen were studied via CCSD(T) theory, together with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. The results for the bond dissociation energies (ground state at 0 K, units: kJ mol-1) are: S-H = 349.9, S-D = 354.7, HS-H = 376.2, DS-D = 383.4, and HO-H = 492.6. These data compare well with experimental literature. The rate constants for the isotopic reactions of H + H2S, D + H2S, H + D2S, and D + D2S are studied at the QCISD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p) level of theory. The contributions of the exchange reaction versus abstraction are examined through transition state ...
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Kinetic studies and computational modeling of atomic chlorine reactions in the gas phase.

Kinetic studies and computational modeling of atomic chlorine reactions in the gas phase.

Date: August 2009
Creator: Alecu, Ionut M.
Description: The gas phase reactions of atomic chlorine with hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, benzene, and ethylene are investigated using the laser flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence experimental technique. In addition, the kinetics of the reverse processes for the latter two elementary reactions are also studied experimentally. The absolute rate constants for these processes are measured over a wide range of conditions, and the results offer new accurate information about the reactivity and thermochemistry of these systems. The temperature dependences of these reactions are interpreted via the Arrhenius equation, which yields significantly negative activation energies for the reaction of the chlorine atom and hydrogen sulfide as well as for that between the phenyl radical and hydrogen chloride. Positive activation energies which are smaller than the overall endothermicity are measured for the reactions between atomic chlorine with ammonia and ethylene, which suggests that the reverse processes for these reactions also possess negative activation energies. The enthalpies of formation of the phenyl and β-chlorovinyl are assessed via the third-law method. The stability and reactivity of each reaction system is further rationalized based on potential energy surfaces, computed with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical methods and refined through the inclusion of effects which arise from the ...
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Kinetic Studies of Hydroxyl and Hydrogen Atom Reactions

Kinetic Studies of Hydroxyl and Hydrogen Atom Reactions

Date: May 2002
Creator: Hu, Xiaohua
Description: Gas phase kinetics of the reactions involving hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom were studied using experimental and ab initio theoretical techniques. The rate constant for the H + H2S reaction has been measured from 298 to 598 K by the laser photolysis/resonance fluorescence (LP-RF) technique. The transition state theory (TST) analysis coupled with the measurements support the suggestion that the reaction shows significant curvature in the Arrhenius plot. The LP-RF technique was also used to measure the rate constant of the H + CH3Br reaction over the temperature range 400-813 K. TST and density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the dominant reaction channel is Br-abstraction. The reaction H + CF2=CF-CF=CF2 was first studied by flash photolysis/resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) method. The experiments of this work revealed distinctly non-Arrhenius behavior, which was interpreted in terms of a change in mechanism. DFT calculations suggest that the adduct is CF2H-CF•-CF=CF2. At lower temperatures a mixture of this molecule and CF2•-CFH-CF=CF2 is likely. The theoretical calculations show that H atom migrates in the fluoroethyl radicals through a bridging intermediate, and the barrier height for this process is lower in the less fluorinated ethyl radical. High level computations were also employed in studies of the ...
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Layered Double Hydroxides and the Origins of Life on Earth

Layered Double Hydroxides and the Origins of Life on Earth

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Date: May 2001
Creator: Brister, Brian
Description: A brief introduction to the current state of research in the Origins of Life field is given in Part I of this work. Part II covers original research performed by the author and co-workers. Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) systems are anion-exchanging clays that have the general formula M(II)xM(III)(OH)(2x+2)Y, where M(II) and M(III) are any divalent and trivalent metals, respectively. Y can be nearly any anion, although modern naturally occuring LDH systems incorporate carbonate (CO32-), chloride (Cl-), or sulfate (SO42-) anions. Intercalated cobalticyanide anion shows a small yet observable deviation from local Oh symmetry causing small differences between its oriented and non-oriented infrared spectra. Nitroprusside is shown to intercalate into 2:1 Mg:Al LDH with decomposition to form intercalated ferrocyanide and nitrosyl groups of an unidentified nature. The [Ru(CN)6]4- anion is shown to intercalate into layered double hydroxides in the same manner as other hexacyano anions, such as ferrocyanide and cobalticyanide, with its three-fold rotational axis perpendicular to the hydroxide sheets. The square-planar tetracyano-nickelate(II), -palladate(II), and platinate(II) anions were intercalated into both 2:1 and 3:1 Mg:Al layered double hydroxides (LDH). The basal spacings in the 2:1 hosts are approximately 11 Å, indicating that the anions are inclined approximately 75 degrees relative to ...
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Layered Double Hydroxides: Morphology, Interlayer Anion, and the Origins of Life

Layered Double Hydroxides: Morphology, Interlayer Anion, and the Origins of Life

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Date: December 2002
Creator: Halcom-Yarberry, Faith Marie
Description: The preparation of layered double hydroxides via co-precipitation of a divalent/trivalent metal solution against a base results in 1 mm LDH particles with a disorganized metal lattice. Research was performed to address these morphological issues using techniques such as Ostwald ripening and precipitation via aluminate. Another interesting issue in layered double hydroxide materials is the uptake and orientation of anions into the interlayer. Questions about iron cyanide interlayer anions have been posed. Fourier transform infared spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction have been used to investigate these topics. It was found that factors such as orientation, anion charge, and anion structure depended on the divalent/trivalent metal ratio of the hydroxide layer and reactivity time. The cyanide self-addition reaction is an important reaction of classical prebiotic chemistry. This reaction has been shown to give rise to amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. At cyanide concentrations similar to that expected on the early earth, hydrolysis to formamide rather than self-addition occurs. One theory to alleviate this side reaction is the use of minerals or clays that are thought to concentrate and catalyze prebiotics of interest. Layered double hydroxides have been studied as a catalyst for this reaction.
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Mechanisms of Methoxide Ion Substitution and Acid- Catalyzed Z/E Isomerization of N-Methoxyimines

Mechanisms of Methoxide Ion Substitution and Acid- Catalyzed Z/E Isomerization of N-Methoxyimines

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Date: December 2001
Creator: Dolliver, Debra D.
Description: The second order rate constants for nucleophilic substitution by methoxide of (Z)- and (E)-O-methylbenzohydroximoyl fluorides [C6H4C(F)=NOCH3] with various substituents on the phenyl ring [p-OCH3 (1h, 2h), p-CH3 (1g, 2g), p-Cl (1f, 2f), p-H (1e, 2e), (3,5)-bis-CF3 (1i, 2i)] in 90:10 DMSO:MeOH have been measured. A Hammett plot of these rate constants vs σ values gave positive ρ values of 2.95 (Z isomer) and 3.29 (E isomer). Comparison of these rates with methoxide substitution rates for Omethylbenzohydroximoyl bromide [C6H4C(Br)=NOCH3] and Omethylbenzohydroximoyl chloride [C6H4C(Cl)=NOCH3] reveal an element effect for the Z isomers of Br:Cl:F(1e) = 2.21:1.00:79.7 and for the E isomers of Cl:F(2e) = 1.00:18.3. With the p-OCH3-imidoyl halides the following element effects are found: Br:Cl:F(1h) = 2.78:1.00:73.1 for the Z isomer and Br:Cl:F(2h) = 1.97:1.00:12.1 for the E isomer. Measurement of activation parameters revealed ∆S≠ = -17 eu for 1e and ∆S≠ = -9.9 eu for 2e. Ab initio calculations (HF/6-31+G*, MP2/6-31+G*//HF/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6- 31+G*//HF/6-31+G*, HF-SCIPCM/6-31+G*//HF/6-31+G*) were performed to define the reaction surface. These calculations demonstrate a relatively large barrier for nucleophilic attack in relation to halogen loss and support the experimental findings that this reaction proceeds by an addition-elimination mechanism (AN# + DN). The imidoyl fluorides have been used to synthesize ...
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Metal-Aluminum Oxide Interactions: Effects of Surface Hydroxylation and High Electric Field

Metal-Aluminum Oxide Interactions: Effects of Surface Hydroxylation and High Electric Field

Date: December 2001
Creator: Niu, Chengyu
Description: Metal and oxide interactions are of broad scientific and technological interest in areas such as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, composite materials, and corrosion. In the real world, such interactions are often complicated by the presence of interfacial impurities and/or high electric fields that may change the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of the metal/oxide interfaces. This research includes: (1) the surface hydroxylation effects on the aluminum oxide interactions with copper adlayers, and (2) effects of high electric fields on the interface of thin aluminum oxide films and Ni3Al substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies and first principles calculations have been carried out to compare copper adsorption on heavily hydroxylated a- Al2O3(0001) with dehydroxylated surfaces produced by Argon ion sputtering followed by annealing in oxygen. For a heavily hydroxylated surface with OH coverage of 0.47 monolayer (ML), sputter deposition of copper at 300 K results in a maximum Cu(I) coverage of ~0.35 ML, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Maximum Cu(I) coverage at 300 K decreases with decreasing surface hydroxylation. Exposure of a partially dehydroxylated a-Al2O3(0001) surface to either air or 2 Torr water vapor results in recovery of surface hydroxylation, which in turn increases the maximum Cu(I) coverage. The ability of surface hydroxyl ...
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Metallization and Modification of Low-k Dielectric Materials

Metallization and Modification of Low-k Dielectric Materials

Date: December 2008
Creator: Martini, David M.
Description: Aluminum was deposited onto both Teflon AF and Parylene AF surfaces by chemical vapor deposition of trimethylaluminum. This work shows that similar thin film (100 Angstroms) aluminum oxide adlayers form on both polymers at the low temperature dosing conditions used in the studies. Upon anneal to room temperature and above, defluorination of the polymer surfaces increased and resulted in fluorinated aluminum oxide adlayers; the adlayers were thermally stable to the highest temperatures tested (600 K). Angle-resolved spectra showed higher levels of fluorination toward the polymer/adlayer interface region. Copper films were also deposited at low temperature onto Teflon AF using a copper hexafluoroacetylacetonate-cyclooctadiene precursor. Annealing up to 600 K resulted in the loss of precursor ligands and a shift to metallic copper. As with aluminum adlayers, some polymer defluorination and resulting metal (copper) fluoride was detected. Parylene AF and polystyrene films surfaces were modified by directly dosing with water vapor passed across a hot tungsten filament. Oxygen incorporation into polystyrene occurred exclusively at aromatic carbon sites, whereas oxygen incorporation into parylene occurred in both aromatic and aliphatic sites. Oxygen x-ray photoelectron spectra of the modified polymers were comparable, indicating that similar reactions occurred. The surface oxygenation of parylene allowed enhanced reactivity ...
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An NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium and of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates

An NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium and of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates

Date: May 2001
Creator: Ferreira, Aluisio V. C.
Description: A 1H, 13C, and 6Li NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium indicated that 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium exists only as a hexameric aggregate over the entire temperature range of 25 to - 92.1 ° C in cyclopentane. Reacting 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium with 2-ethyl-1-butanol resulted in alkyllithium/lithium alkoxide mixed aggregates, apparently of the form Ra(RO)bLia+b. A multinuclear, variable temperature NMR study of samples with O:Li ratios of 0.2 and 0.4 showed, in addition to the alkyllithium, the formation of four mixed aggregates, one of them probably an octamer. Higher O:Li ratio samples showed the formation of several other mixed aggregates. Mixing 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium with independently prepared lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide formed the same mixed aggregates formed by in situ synthesis of lithium alkoxide. Lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide also exists as aggregates in cyclopentane.
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