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 Department: Department of English
The Development of the Religious Thought of T. S. Eliot
This thesis will concern itself with the development of the religious thought of Eliot as it is expressed in his poetry and plays. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163911/
The Development of the Unheroic Hero in the Modern Novel
This thesis explores the development of the unheroic hero in the modern novel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130337/
The Devil in Legend and Literature
The purpose of this paper is to trace some of the accepted characteristics of the devil to their origins through a study of folklore and ancient religions. The characteristics include the principal form taken by each devil and trace its beginnings through folklore; the animals connected with these devils; powers allotted to these devils; and purposes served by these devils. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130483/
Dialect Preterites and Past Participles in the North Central States and Upper Midwest : A Generative Analysis
This paper will propose a generative analysis of McDavid's dialect verb forms. The concepts of Chomsky and Halle as presented in SPE form the framework for this study. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131644/
Diane Di Prima: The Muffled Voice of the Beat Generation
The Beat rejection of conventional values meant a rejection of marriage, family, and a nine-to-five job, and few women were prepared to make that kind of radical shift in a society that condemned women for behaving the way the Beats behaved. Though she has faced difficulty in getting published, Beat writer Diane Di Prima has been publishing steadily for the past forty years. Di Prima has also lived the life of a Beat, wandering the country, avoiding nine-to-five work and supporting herself with grants, teaching and poetry readings. In spite of her success and adherence to the Beat lifestyle, Di Prima has given birth to five children, all of whom she took with her in her travels. Diane Di Prima has always faced the particular challenge of gaining the acceptance of her male peers amid indifference and hatred toward her sex while not allowing these men to go unanswered. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279198/
Differences in Katherine Mansfield and Anton Chekhov as Short Story Writers
The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of Katherine Mansfield's literary indebtedness to Anton Chekhov. Throughout the critical writing about Mansfield there are many suggestions that her work is similar to that of Chekhov, but, these allusions are, for the most part, vague in pointing out specific likenesses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108123/
Directed Reading toward Self-Understanding for Adolescents: a Teacher's Guide
This thesis provides annotations for contemporary adolescent novels for the purpose of serving as a guide for English teachers in the individual selection of novels for outside reading by adolescents in grades nine, ten, eleven, and twelve. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131163/
"Distance" and Other Stories
"Distance" and Other Stories is a collection of four short stories and a novella that explore the themes of isolation and personal revelation. The dissertation opens with a preface which describes my background as a writer and the forces that shape my work, including science fiction, technology and the internet, cultural marginalization, and Joseph Campbell's hero's motif. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4621/
Distances
I provide in my preface a brief account of my development as a creative writer. Through this development I draw an analogy to the evolution of modern science by stating that my need for personal clarity is analogous to the charge for empirical clarity of modern science. Furthermore, I contrast the objectivism of modern science to the subjectivism of creative writing. The four short stories in my thesis range from a semi-autobiographical story, to two short stories that stem out further and further from the subjective origin of the first story. The story of greatest distance is “Fireflies,” which is not semi-autobiographical, but pure fiction. The final short story returns to the subjective origin of the first. The drive of Distances is thereby to create a sort parabola: a subjective, semi-autobiographical origin, to an objective, purely fictional crest, then a return to that subjective, semi-autobiographical origin. The entire collection is a holistic, ultimately subjective, and therefore personal experience; yet, through the use certain tropes,metaphors others can relate to, the stories are paradoxically sharable. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3675/
Distorted Traditions: the Use of the Grotesque in the Short Fiction of Eudora Welty, Carson Mccullers, Flannery O'connor, and Bobbie Ann Mason.
This dissertation argues that the four writers named above use the grotesque to illustrate the increasingly peculiar consequences of the assault of modernity on traditional Southern culture. The basic conflict between the views of Bakhtin and Kayser provides the foundation for defining the grotesque herein, and Geoffrey Harpham's concept of "margins" helps to define interior and exterior areas for the discussion. Chapter 1 lays a foundation for why the South is different from other regions of America, emphasizing the influences of Anglo-Saxon culture and traditions brought to these shores by the English gentlemen who settled the earliest tidewater colonies as well as the later influx of Scots-Irish immigrants (the Celtic-Southern thesis) who settled the Piedmont and mountain regions. This chapter also notes that part of the South's peculiarity derives from the cultural conflicts inherent between these two groups. Chapters 2 through 5 analyze selected short fiction from each of these respective authors and offer readings that explain how the grotesque relates to the drastic social changes taking place over the half-century represented by these authors. Chapter 6 offers an evaluation of how and why such traditions might be preserved. The overall argument suggests that traditional Southern culture grows out of four foundations, i. e., devotion to one's community, devotion to one's family, devotion to God, and love of place. As increasing modernization and homogenization impact the South, these cultural foundations have been systematically replaced by unsatisfactory or confusing substitutes, thereby generating something arguably grotesque. Through this exchange, the grotesque has moved from the observably physical, as shown in the earlier works discussed, to something internalized that is ultimately depicted through a kind of intellectual if not physical stasis, as shown through the later works. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4591/
The Distribution of Prepositions in English Adverbial Phrases
This thesis describes the rules of prepositions in English adverbial phrases. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130694/
Divine and the Everyday Devil (Short Stories)
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Divine and the Everyday Devil contains a scholarly preface that discusses the experiences and literary works that influenced the author's writing with special attention in regards to spirituality and sexuality. The preface is followed by six original short stories. "Evil" is a work addressing a modern conception of evil. "Eschatology" concerns a man facing his own mortality. "The Gospel of Peter" tells the story of a husband grappling with his wife's religious beliefs. "The Mechanics of Projects" relates the experiences of a woman looking for love in Mexico. "The Rocky Normal Show" involves a husband growing apart from his wife and "Mutant: An Origin Story" is about a teenager trying to find his own unique identity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4159/
The Divine Comedy as a Source for the Poetry of T. S. Eliot
In spite of the large amount of criticism written about T. S. Eliot, no attempt has been made to point out the great debt that Eliot owes to Dante Alighieri, and the pervasive influence of The Divine Comedy on Eliot's poetical works. This thesis endeavors to illustrate the extent of that debt and influence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130396/
Do Not Eat Fish from These Waters and Other Stories
Earl suffers from a guilty obsession with a monster catfish. Eddie Klomp searches dog tracks for the ghosts of his lost childhood. Mike Towns is a hopeless blues musician who loses everything he cares for. Blair Evans learns to love a pesky wart. Americana becomes confused with the difference between knowledge and sex. Do Not Eat Fish from These Waters And Other Stories is a collection of short stories that explores the strange and often defeated lives of these Southern characters (and one from the point-of-view of a feral hog). Each man, woman, and hog flails through a period of potential metamorphosis trying to find some sort of meaning and worth in the past, present and future. Not all of these characters succeed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278886/
Dominant Themes in the Novels of Ernest Hemingway
This thesis proposes to show that Hemingway's novels reveal a change of attitude which culminates in an increased faith in the ultimate goodness and dignity of man. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130454/
Don Juan in Hell: a Key to Reading Shaw
Since George Bernard Shaw claims that the third act of Man and Superman is a complete commentary on his philosophy, this thesis is a revealing of the philosophy demonstrated in the Dream Scene, and it is an intensive study of the third act based upon a reading of the play. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130466/
Dostoevsky and the Irresistible Idea
The primary goal of this paper is to investigate the phenomenon of a dream, a desire, or an idea transpiring in the thoughts of an individual, growing in importance to the individual, and finally becoming an idée fixe, or irresistible idea, which cannot be suppressed by the individual. The investigation will be concerned with the two of Dostoevsky's heroes who best exemplify the phenomenon. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163918/
Dostoevsky's Conception of Love
This thesis looks at Dostoevsky's conception of love as demonstrated in his novels. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130630/
Dostoyevsky: a Resource for Modern Youth
This thesis looks at two questions regarding the teaching of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's works in high school and junior college: which of Dostoyevsky's works should be used, and what materials in those works selected should one consider most necessary for emphasis in the actual teaching of the works. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131165/
Dostoyevsky and the Slavophiles
Just to what degree Dostoyevsky's thoughts paralleled those of the Slavophiles will be outlined in subsequent chapters in three major areas--Orthodoxy, Autocracy, and Nationality. Uvarov's old 1828 formula provides a simple outline in which to describe and compare the more complicated core of Dostoyevskyan and Slavophile philosophy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131289/
Dostoyevsky's American Reputation to 1930
Undoubtedly, Dostoyevsky's influence upon the novel is great, but, even yet, few concrete studies have been made and no full-length study has been published. It is hoped that this account of Dostoyevsky's reputation in America during the 1920's will be of assistance in the greater task of tracing Dostoyevsky's influence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108135/
Dostoyevsky's View of the Role of Suffering in Human Existence
In order to establish the views on suffering held by the nineteenth-century (1821-1881) Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky, it is first necessary to determine the viewpoint of his age. In general, it was an age of humanitarianism-- the age of "compassion for the suffering of human beings," the age of optimism, of faith in a morality established by science and reason." Humanitarianism itself was an outgrowth of the Age of Enlightenment, the eighteenth-century intellectual movement which emphasized reason. This age of reason reflected the progress in science, which had weakened the hold of the Church and of faith on men's minds. Dostoyevsky's rejection of socialism made it necessary for him to reject the corollary of socialism: the elimination of human suffering. Thus he was forced to evolve a personal interpretation for the suffering that he would not let be abolished. Critics generally consider Siberia to be the turning point in Dostoyevsky's life, both from a personal and a literary standpoint. Before his imprisonment, Dostoyevskyts values were too immature for him to develop a significant theory illuminating the problem of suffering. It took Siberia to teach Dostoyevsky the meaning of metaphysical suffering-- the search for the meaning of God and reality. This meaning can be traced in the majority of his post-Siberian works in the form of the theory that happiness and ultimate salvation are made available to man through the purifying effects of his metaphysical sufferings. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc663218/
Down and Out: A Novel
A creative dissertation consisting of two parts: a novel and a critical preface. The critical preface, titled “Novel without Falsehood” deals directly with David Shields’s Reality Hunger, touching on issues of reality as it pertains to truth, writing, fiction, and contemporary culture. The novel is entitled Down and Out and follows the fortunes of a small town in Arkansas before, during, and after its sole source of employment ceases to exist. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799551/
The Drama of George Farquhar.
This thesis explores the characters, themes, and comic devices used in the drama of George Farquhar. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130572/
Dramatic Experiment in the Plays of Eugene O'Neill
This survey of Eugene O'Neill's works attempts to establish that fact that he used a number of dramatic experiments in his plays and that he used them successfully. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75286/
A Drop of Oil
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Many Christian writers point to God through their fiction without openly evangelizing. The images their words evoke lift their secular and religious readers' heads, for God is reflected in their use of language, the emotions they describe, and the actions of their characters. The preface and short stories in this collection aim to show that God's presence can be felt even when people are suffering due to human decisions and mistakes. He is with His creations in the midst of their pain to impart hope when they need it most. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4739/
The Early Criticisms of Shelley in England and America
It is the principal purpose of this study of the early criticisms of Shelley to contrast the opinions of him in England and America and to find reasons for the widely divergent attitudes of the reviewers in the two countries. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83583/
East, West, Somewhere in the Middle
A work of creative fiction in novella form, this dissertation follows the first-person travails of Mitch Zeller, a 26-year-old gay man who is faced with an unexpected choice. The dissertation opens with a preface which examines the form of the novella and the content of this particular work. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277715/
Eaten: A Novel
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This novel operates on two levels. First, it is a story concerning the fate of a young woman named Raven Adams, who is prompted into journeying westward after witnessing what she believes to be an omen. On another level, however, the novel is intended to be a philosophical questioning of western modes of “science-based” singular conceptualizations of reality, which argue that there is only one “real world” and anyone who deviates from this is “crazy,” “stupid,” or “wrong.” Raven as a character sees the world in terms of what might be called “magical thinking” in modern psychology; her closest relationship is with a living embodiment of a story, the ancient philosopher Diogenes, which she believes is capable of possessing others and directing her journey. As the story continues the reader comes to understand Raven’s perceptions of her reality, leading to a conceptualization of reality as being “multi-layered.” Eventually these layers are collapsed and unified in the final chapters. The novel makes use of many reference points including philosophy, classical mythology, folklore, religion, and internet social media in order to guide the reader along Raven’s story. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc849746/
The Eccentrics of Tobias Smollett's Novels
Tobias Smollet's purpose in writing was twofold: to entertain the reader and to satirize man and his society. To accomplish his aim, the author created eccentric personalities in the old Elizabethan humour convention. This thesis looks at Smollet's characterizations, especially of the eccentrics, in his novels. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130479/
Edgar Allan Poe in Relation to his Times
This study is based upon the prose works of Poe and covers the topis of politics and social reforms, contemporary attitudes toward death, customs, science and pseudo-science, and contemporary literature. The thesis attempts to prove that Poe's works show manifest evidences of his being a product of his times. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70285/
Edwin Shrake: An Introduction and an Interpretation
The purpose of this investigation is to provide a preliminary critical study of a contemporary Texas novelist. Edwin Shrake. No critical studies on his works have been published; therefore, the sources of data for the paper are limited to the novels and reviews of the books. One chapter is devoted to each of Shrake's major works-- But. Not for Love, Blessed McGill, and Strange Peaches. The plot, characterization, themes, regionalism, and artistic techniques of each novel are studied, and the strengths and weaknesses of each are discussed in order to determine its literary merit. The study concludes that Shrake is a regional novelist whose use of a limited setting does not limit the impact of his books. Through his universal themes, Shrake creates novels that are international in scope. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc504138/
The Effect of Journalism on Modern American Writing
This paper is an analysis of the relationship between journalism and formal literary usage in America. It is the purpose of this study to define and illustrate characteristics of modern journalese and to make a comparison of standards of correct usage advocated by recent textbooks in English composition and journalism. Particular attention will be given to diction, structure and length of sentences, capitalization, abbreviation, and punctuation. The conclusion will be a brief evaluation of modern journalism, a succinct resume of its impact on modern language and literature, and a simple prediction of future tendencies in journalistic and literary language. And to give a better perspective to the analysis of journalism and American English, the paper begins with a description of the American linguistic heritage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699668/
Eight Original Short Stories : "A Rotten Way of Life" and Others
This thesis is a creative one, comprised of eight short stories which deal with a variety of subjects. All of the material is concerned with personal or vicarious experience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131347/
Elements of Old English Prosody in the Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins
This thesis attempts to explain the Anglo-Saxon influence on Hopkins's poetry by providing a biographical study of his life to determine when he acquired knowledge of the Anglo-Saxon. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131186/
Elements of the Byronic Hero in Captain Ahab
This study of the elements of the Byronic hero in Herman Melville's Captain Ahab includes a look at the Byronic hero and Byron himself, the Byronic hero and the Gothic tradition, the Byronic hero and his "humanities," and the Byronic hero and Prometheus-Lucifer. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163945/
Elizabeth Barrett Browning: Quest for the Father
This dissertation explores Elizabeth Barrett's dependency on the archetypal Victorian patriarch. Chapter I focuses on the psychological effects of this father-daughter relationship on Elizabeth Barrett. Chapter II addresses Barrett's acceptance of the conventional female role, which is suggested by the nature and the situation of the women she chooses to depict. These women are placed in situations where they can reveal their devotion to family, their capacity for passive endurance, and their wish to resist. Almost always, they choose death as an alternative to life where a powerful father figure is present. Chapter III concentrates on the highly sentimental images of women and children whom Barrett places in a divine order, where they exist untouched by the concerns of the social order of which they are a part. Chapter IV shows that the conventional ideologies of the time, society's commitment to the "angel in the house," and the small number of female role models before her increase her difficulty to find herself a place within this order. Chapter V discusses Aurora Leigh's mission to find herself an identity and to maintain the connection with her father or father substitute. Despite Elizabeth Barrett's desire to break away from her paternal ties and to establish herself as an independent woman and poet, her unconditional loyalty and love towards her father and her tremendous need for his affection, and the security he provides restrain her resistance and surface the child in her. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279212/
Elizabeth Bishop in Brasil: An Ongoing Acculturation
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Elizabeth Bishop (1911–1979), one of the foremost modern American poets, lived in Brasil during seventeen-odd years beginning in 1951. During this time she composed the poetry collection Questions of Travel, stand-alone poems, and fragments as well as prose pieces and translations. This study builds on the work of critics such as Brett Millier and Lorrie Goldensohn who have covered Bishop’s poetry during her Brasil years. However, most American critics have lacked expertise in both Brasilian culture and the Portuguese language that influenced Bishop’s poetry. Since 2000, in contrast, Brasilian critic Paulo Henriques Britto has explored issues of translating Bishop’s poetry into Portuguese, while Maria Lúcia Martins and Regina Przybycien have examined Bishop’s Brasil poems from a Brasilian perspective. However, American and Brasilian scholars have yet to recognize Bishop’s journey of acculturation as displayed through her poetry chronologically or the importance of her belated reception by Brasilian literary and popular culture. This study argues that Bishop’s Brasil poetry reveals her gradual transformation from a tourist outsider to a cultural insider through her encounters with Brasilian history, culture, language, and politics. It encompasses Bishop’s published and unpublished Brasil poetry, including drafts from the Elizabeth Bishop Papers at Vassar College. On a secondary level, this study examines a reverse acculturation in how Brasilian popular and literary communities have increasingly focused on Bishop since her death, culminating in the 2013 film, Flores Raras (Reaching for the Moon in English). Understanding this extremely rare and sustained intercultural junction of Bishop in Brasil, a junction that no American poet has made since, adds a crucial angle to twentieth-first century transnational literary perspectives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700061/
Ellen Glasgow, Virginia Rebel
This study shows that her fiction was an influence in pointing the way to American Naturalism as a literary school and that, by her devotion to a single idea over a long span of years, she endows all womankind with stature. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107890/
Emersonian Ideas in Whitman's Early Writings
This thesis will be an attempt to gather together the important ideas set forth in Whitman's early writing which are to be found also in Emerson's lectures, essays, and poems written before 1855. It will attempt to show what Whitman might have gained from Emerson if he had had no other source, and if a creative intellect had not the power of originating its own ideas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83422/
Emerson's Ideal of Education
This paper discusses what Ralph Waldo Emerson believes to be the aim of education and how he thinks the aim is to be reached. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70312/
Emerson's Representative Men: a Study of Emerson's Six Representative Types
The purpose of this thesis is to relate the six personalities dealt with by Ralph Waldo Emerson in his Representative Men to such proportions of the essayist's ideas as may be applied to these six representative types, to the end of arriving at an understanding of Emerson's aim in writing about these six men and about great men in general. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83364/
Emily Dickinson and Nature
The purpose of this thesis is to show upon what aspects of nature Emily Dickinson's poems touch, to what extent and in what manner she uses nature terms in expressing her philosophy of life, what ideas she expresses through these terms, and finally what her own philosophy of nature is. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70356/
English Adverbials of Degree and Extent
This thesis presents detailed descriptions of the English adverbial of degree (e.g., very, quite,rather,extremely) and the adverbial of extent (e.g., much, some, at all, excessively). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131400/
English Pastoral Drama, 1580-1642
It will be the purpose of the remaining chapters of this thesis to trace the characteristics and conventions of the pastoral as they can be observed in specific bucolic works from various writers of various nationalities and ultimately examine specific examples of English pastoral drama in light of these conventions and characteristics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108003/
English Renaissance Epithalamia
The classical genre of marriage poems called epithalamia appeared in England in the late sixteenth century. The English epithalamia of the Renaissance form a closely related body of literature. This work will be a close analysis of this small body of English Renaissance poetry. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131276/
English Utopias
This thesis discusses Utopian thought and compares the Utopias of Plato, Sir Thomas More, Sir Francis Bacon, and Jonathan Swift in the areas of government, education, and social problems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70269/
The Epic Element in Hiawatha
By tracing the development of the epic, oral and written, as in Chapter III, the qualities that are characteristic of the epic and the devices associated with the epic through continued usage were found to be the constant factors upon which the definition of the epic is formulated. The application to Hiawatha of the epic definition in terms of form, theme, subject matter, characters, tone, the use of the supernatural, and the use of characteristic devices, strengthens the thesis that Longfellow has written an epic. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130317/
Epic Qualities in Moby-Dick
Many critics not satisfied with explaining Moby-Dick in terms of the novel, have sough analogies in other literary genres. Most often parallels have been drawn from epic and dramatic literature. Critics have called Moby-Dick either an epic or a tragedy. After examining the evidence presented by both schools of thought, after establishing a workable definition of the epic and listing the most common epic devices, and after examining Moby-Dick in terms of this definition and discovering many of the epic devices in it, I propose the thesis that Melville has written an epic, not unlike the great epics of the past. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130299/
The Epic Strain in Joseph Conrad
This thesis will attempt to show that the three major works of Conrad's middle period -- Nostromo, The Secret Agent, and Under Western Eyes -- are essentially literary epics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163922/