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The Role of Learning in Emergency Physicians' Process of Changing Practice Behavior

The Role of Learning in Emergency Physicians' Process of Changing Practice Behavior

Date: May 1994
Creator: Garcia, Rebecca, 1953-
Description: The sequence of events leading to the implementation of a change in emergency physicians' practice and the learning activities and processes undertaken are examined and described in this study. A qualitative case study design was utilized and semi-structured interviews were employed as the primary means of data collection. Thirty emergency physicians were interviewed in face-to-face or telephone interviews. One change that required learning was selected per physician for an in-depth interview. The following factors were examined: motivation to change a practice behavior, time to implementation of changes, source of awareness, barriers to change, use of learning resources, stages in the change process, and method of learning.
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The Role of Local Law Enforcement Agencies in Dealing with Juvenile Delinquency

The Role of Local Law Enforcement Agencies in Dealing with Juvenile Delinquency

Date: June 1956
Creator: Beckham, Harold Grady
Description: This thesis discusses the history of law enforcement and the role of local law enforcement agencies dealing with juveniles and juvenile delinquency.
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The Role of Modern Love in the Alexandria Quartet

The Role of Modern Love in the Alexandria Quartet

Date: August 1965
Creator: Krause, Leslie A.
Description: This thesis examines the idea of modern love as expressed in the four novels of Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet.
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The Role of Motivation in Second Language Pronunciation

The Role of Motivation in Second Language Pronunciation

Date: August 2005
Creator: Wen, Tao-Chih
Description: This thesis investigates the phonological ability of exceptional second language (L2) learners of English and their levels of motivation. This study is the first of its kind to do a large-scale examination of L2 learners whose first languages (L1s) do not belong to the same Indo-European language family as English. Fifteen non-native speakers (NNSs) of English filled out a questionnaire and produced four speech samples, including a picture description task, paragraph reading task, sentence reading and word reading task. Fifteen native speaker (NS) controls also produced the same speech samples. Four NSs judged all participants' accents. Six NNSs scored as highly as NSs on some of the speech segments using a 2-standard deviation (SD) cut-off point. There was no significant correlation between their scores on pronunciation and motivation.
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Role of N-Acylethanolamines in Plant Defense Responses: Modulation by Pathogens and Commercial Antimicrobial Stressors

Role of N-Acylethanolamines in Plant Defense Responses: Modulation by Pathogens and Commercial Antimicrobial Stressors

Date: August 2010
Creator: Vadapalli, Vatsala
Description: N-acyl ethanolamines (NAEs) are a class of lipids recently recognized as signaling molecules which are controlled, in part, by their degradation by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). On the basis of previous studies indicating increased NAE levels in a tobacco cell suspension-xylanase elicitor exposure system and the availability of FAAH mutants, overexpressor and knockout (OE and KO) genotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana, further roles of NAEs in A. thaliana plant defense was investigated. The commonly occurring urban antimicrobial contaminant triclosan (TCS) has been shown to suppress lipid signaling associated with plant defense responses. Thus, a second objective of this study was to determine if TCS exposure specifically interferes with NAE levels. No changes in steady state NAE profiles in A. thaliana-Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and A. thaliana-flagellin (bacterial peptide, flg22) challenge systems were seen despite evidence that defense responses were activated in these systems. There was a significant drop in enoyl-ACP reductase (ENR) enzyme activity, which catalyzes the last step in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway in plants, on exposure of the seedlings to TCS at 10 ppm for 24 h and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production due to flg22 in long term exposure of 0.1 ppm and short term ...
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The Role of Neuronal Histamine in Memory Processing

The Role of Neuronal Histamine in Memory Processing

Date: December 1995
Creator: Stutts, William A. (William Anderson)
Description: Neuronal histamine(HA) may play a role in memory processing. This hypothesis is based upon evidence that the action of histamine at central H1 and H2 histamine receptor sites has been shown to modulate memory of rats and mice in adversely-motivated tasks. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis more thoroughly in mice using two distinct approaches to neuronal HA manipulation. One approach involved the use of new pharmacological agents which act at the histamine H3 receptor. It has been demonstrated that the selective H3 antagonist thioperamide increases HA release in the brain of mice whereas the H3 agonist imetit decreases HA release via modulation of presynaptic H3 autoreceptors. It was expected that an increase in neuronal HA via the autoreceptor mechanism would result in facilitation of memory processing whereas a decrease in HA release would disrupt memory processing. The second approach involved the manipulation of cerebral HA levels via the specific enzyme inhibiting compounds alpha-flouromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH), a potent neuronal HA depleter and metoprine, a histamine-methyl transferase inhibitor which results in accumulation of neuronal HA. Again, effects of increased HA due to metoprine and decreased HA levels due to alpha-FMH were expected to facilitate and disrupt memory processing ...
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Role of Parental Anxiety on Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Role of Parental Anxiety on Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Date: May 2009
Creator: Didehbani, Nyaz
Description: The proposed study examined the relationship between parental anxiety, measured both subjectively (via self-report questionnaires) and objectively (via salivary cortisol) and the child's feeding progress. Children diagnosed with a feeding disorder were recruited with their parents at Our Children's House at Baylor (n=19; 11 females, 8 males). The patients and their parents were housed in the clinic for an eight-week intensive multidisciplinary pediatric feeding disorder treatment program. Calorie intake was recorded daily as outcome measures of treatment progression. Parental anxiety was measured by the Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP), state anxiety on the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and by salivary cortisol at three different time points. The present study attempted to examine whether parental feeding (phase three of treatment program) would continue to cause a decrease in the child's caloric intake. In averaging ten meals prior to parental feeding in comparison to the average of ten meals following parental feeding, there was no significant difference as measured by a t-test. Paired t-tests examined parental anxiety from time one to time two and found that salivary cortisol increased significantly t(15) = -6.07, p = .000 from Time 1 (M = 2.30, SD = 1.64) to Time 2 (M = 5.24, ...
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The Role of Parental Involvement in a Chapter I Extended-Day Kindergarten

The Role of Parental Involvement in a Chapter I Extended-Day Kindergarten

Date: August 1992
Creator: Stiefer, Toni Kilpatrick
Description: This studied investigated parental involvement during the first year of a Chapter I extended-day kindergarten program which sought to promote parents taking an active role in their child's classroom and kindergarten educational experiences. A qualitative design was used to provide information about frequency and types of parental involvement as well as descriptive information about the interactions between parents and children within the classroom. This qualitative design also allowed investigation of the perceptions of the participants. Data analysis was ongoing and inductive; data were collected in the form of field notes, videotapes, audiotapes, interviews and classroom documents. Findings suggest that parental involvement provides benefits for the students, parents, teachers and the school as a whole. Findings also suggest that adult volunteers do not necessarily have to be parents; the adult volunteers could come from segments of the population that are not now fully utilized. Senior citizens and university teacher education students are two groups that could fill the volunteer positions. These findings have implications for the educational community in public schools and in teacher training programs of universities.
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The role of prostaglandins, nitric oxide and oxygen in the ductus arteriosi of the pre-term chicken embryo (Gallus domesticus).

The role of prostaglandins, nitric oxide and oxygen in the ductus arteriosi of the pre-term chicken embryo (Gallus domesticus).

Date: December 2007
Creator: Greyner, Henry José
Description: The chicken ductus arteriosi (DA) are two embryonic blood vessels that shunt blood away from the non-ventilated lungs and towards the body and chorioallantoic membrane. I show that prostaglandins have a diminished role in maintaining chicken DA patency and nitric oxide inhibits oxygen induced contraction of the day 19 proximal DA in a time dependent manner. The pathways governing oxygen induced contraction in the chicken DA are similar to those found in mammals and include contributions from ROS, Kv channels, L-type Ca2+ channels, and the Rho kinase pathway. Longer exposure to high oxygen generates increased oxygen induced constriction of the day 19 DA that may be mediated through the Rho kinase pathway.
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The role of resilience in mediating outcomes associated with grandparents raising their grandchildren.

The role of resilience in mediating outcomes associated with grandparents raising their grandchildren.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2009
Creator: Davis, Shanna R.
Description: The occurrence of custodial grandparents is increasing greatly. These grandparents face added stress and many adversities that arise from caregiving. Findings of current research tends to be mixed on the effects of grandparents raising grandchildren experience. Much research concludes that grandparent caregivers experience negative declines in overall health and well-being, while other research points out that the caregiving role may actually be a positive experience for the grandparent. The current study hypothesizes that mixed research may be a result of varying levels of resilience in the custodial grandparent population. The model proposed in this study looks at resilience as a mediator between several variables that effect custodial grandparenting. The current sample consisted of 239 custodial grandparents. A regression/correlation analysis was conducted on the data, and it was found that resilience levels were significant in mediating the effects of grandparent caregiving.
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