You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of English
A Country With No Name
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
A Country With No Name is a collection of thirty-four poems with a preface explaining the style and influences of the author. The preface defends plain-language techniques in poetry, using W.H. Auden, Wislawa Szymborska, and Paul Simon as examples of poets who take a similar approach. The poems range in topic from personal and familial to societal and abstract. The main subjects encompass interpersonal relationships, romantic and otherwise, and larger concerns, such as the effects of war and modern lifestyles. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4460/
A Course of Study in the Use of the Dictionary
Teachers sometimes assume that their students are more skillful in the use of the dictionary than they actually are. Today's student needs thorough, formal training that is cumulative over his school years and that is based on the same linguistic principles that have raised the art of lexicography to its present high level. It is the purpose of this thesis to provide a plan for attaining these ends. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163963/
Crazy People
Crazy People, a collection of short stories, presents characters and their various psychological crutches. The preface explores the concept of negative space as it applies to short fiction, manifesting itself in the form of open-ended endings, miscommunication between characters, rhetorical questions, and allusions to unspecified characters. The preface seeks to differentiate "good" space from "bad" space by citing examples from the author's own work, as well as the works of Raymond Carver, Dan Chaon, and Stanley Fish. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4614/
The Crimson Veldt
This thesis is a work of creative fiction in the form of a novel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107878/
A Critical Introduction to the Proletarian Novels of Alan Sillitoe
This study seeks to analyze each of Sillitoe's proletarian novels as a separate artistic endeavor, to study each in terms of its critical reception, plot, theme, characterization, setting, and style. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131120/
A Critical Study of The Cenci
Consciously or unconsciously an author's literary work reflects his experiences and his reaction to these experiences. Because the personal history of the author is inseparable from his works, a study of The Cenci would be incomplete without a review of the background of Shelley's life, some of the philosophies which interested him, and the political and social movements with which he concerned himself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83571/
Criticism of "Kubla Khan"
The problem with which this study is concerned is analysis of the criticism of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Kubla Khan." This poem, one of the poet's most widely anthologized poems, has been the subject of forty-five articles. The poem has also been treated extensively in a number of books. The criticism is divided into three categories: psychological, literary, and archetypal. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131465/
Current Trends in the Interpretation of Othello
This thesis will be mostly concerned with the twentieth-century criticism of Othello; some attention will be given to earlier criticism to determine to what extent twentieth-century criticism fits into patterns of thinking before the twentieth century. Some consideration will be given to the background of Othello before taking up the various aspects and periods of criticism. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130495/
Damned good daughter.
My dissertation is a memoir based on my childhood experiences growing up with a mentally ill mother. She exhibited violence both passive and aggressive, and the memoir explores my relationship with her and my relationship with the world through her. "Damned Good Daughter" developed with my interest in creative nonfiction as a genre. I came to it after studying poetry, discovering that creative nonfiction offers a form that accommodates both the lyric impulse in poetry and the shaping impulse of story in fiction. In addition, the genre makes a place for the first person I in relation to the order and meaning of a life story. Using reverse chronology, my story begins with the present and regresses toward childhood, revealing the way life experiences with a mentally ill parent build on one another. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4163/
Dark Houses: Navigating Space and Negotiating Silence in the Novels of Faulkner, Warren and Morrison
Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher," as early as 1839, reveals an uneasiness about the space of the house. Most literary scholars accept that this anxiety exists and causes some tension, since it seems antithetical to another dominant motif, that of the power of place and the home as sanctuary. My critical persona, like Poe's narrator in "The House of Usher," looks into a dark, silent tarn and shudders to see in it not only the reflection of the House of Usher, but perhaps the whole of what is "Southern" in Southern Literature. Many characters who inhabit the worlds of Southern stories also inhabit houses that, like the House of Usher, are built on the faulty foundation of an ideological system that divides the world into inside(r)/outside(r) and along numerous other binary lines. The task of constructing the self in spaces that house such ideologies poses a challenge to the characters in the works under consideration in this study, and their success in doing so is dependant on their ability to speak authentically in the language of silence and to dwell instead of to just inhabit interior spaces. In my reading of Faulkner and Warren, this ideology of division is clearly to be at fault in the collapse of houses, just as it is seen to be in the House of Usher. This emphasis is especially conspicuous in several works, beginning with Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! and its (pre)text, "Evangeline." Warren carries the motif forward in his late novels, Flood and Meet Me in the Green Glen. I examine these works relative to spatial analysis and an aesthetic of absence, including an interpretation of silence as a mode of authentic saying. I then discuss these motifs as they are operating in Toni Morrison's Beloved, and finally take Song of Solomon as both an end and a beginning to these texts' concerns with collapsing structures of narrative and house. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2732/
Dark Imagery in Women in Love
This thesis discusses the characters, themes, and imagery in the novel Women in Love written by D.H. Lawrence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130806/
Dawn in the Empty House
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
The preface to this collection of poems, "Memory and The Myth of Lost Truth," explores the physical and metaphysical roles memory plays within poetry. It examines the melancholy frequently birthed from a particular kind poetic self-inquiry, or, more specifically, the feelings associated with recognizing the self's inability to re-inhabit the emotional experience of past events, and how poetry can redeem, via engaging our symbolic intuition, the faultiness of remembered history. Dawn in the Empty House is a collection of poems about the implications of human relationships, self-deception, and memory as a tool for self-discovery. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12091/
Dead Fox Run: A Collection of Stories
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
This collection consists of a critical preface and five linked short stories. The preface analyzes the usage of violence in literate and other forms of media, and specifically the ways in which literature can address violence without aggrandizing or stylizing it. The stories explore this idea through the lens of the lives of two young men, following them from boyhood marked by violence to adulthood crushed by the trauma of the American Civil War. Collection includes the stories "Dead Foxes," "Cow Pen," "Fatherless," "Woodsmoke," and "Brotherhood." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc68046/
The Death Theme in Albert Camus' Plays
The purpose of this thesis is to consider Camus's use of the death metaphor and its probable meaning for him. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131314/
A Decade of Grammatical Liberalism
Against the background of conservatism, liberalism, and counter-reaction among linguists, this study will survey the degrees of liberality shown by the writers of a group of present-day handbooks and grammars toward six disputable issues. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130414/
The Decay of the Yoknapatawpha Aristocracy in the Works of William Faulkner
This study consists of an examination in detail of those facets of character, and conduct arising from character, which specifically account for the decay of the aristocracy of Yoknapatawpha; and by way of emphasis, of the specifically regenerative attitudes and actions which have sufficed to preserve various individuals of this class who have endured as fully adequate human beings. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108143/
Defoe's Attitude Toward the Position of Women in the Eighteenth Century
The suggestions with which this thesis will be concerned are those that apply not so much to mankind as a whole as those pertaining to womankind. Defore surprisingly had much to say about women and their problems; it is surprising especially when we consider that hardly anyone other than the women themselves bothered to pay any attention to these afflictions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130838/
Detecting masculinity: The positive masculine qualities of fictional detectives.
Detective fiction highlights those qualities of masculinity that are most valuable to a contemporary culture. In mysteries a cultural context is more thoroughly revealed than in any other genre of literature. Through the crimes, an audience can understand not only the fears of a particular society but also the level of calumny that society assigns to a crime. As each generation has needed a particular set of qualities in its defense, so the detective has provided them. Through the detective's response to particular crimes, the reader can learn the delineation of forgivable and unforgivable acts. These detectives illustrate positive masculinity, proving that fiction has more uses than mere entertainment. In this paper, I trace four detectives, each from a different era. Sherlock Holmes lives to solve problems. His primary function is to solve a riddle. Lord Peter Wimsey takes on the moral question of why anyone should detect at all. His stories involve the difficulty of justifying putting oneself in the morally superior position of judge. The Mike Hammer stories treat the difficulty of dealing with criminals who use the law to protect themselves. They have perverted the protections of society, and Hammer must find a way to bring them to justice outside of the law. The Kate Martinelli stories focus more on the victims of crime than on the criminals. Martinelli discovers the motivations that draw a criminal toward a specific victim and explains what it is about certain victims that makes villains want to harm them. All of these detectives display the traditional traits of the Western male. They are hunters; they protect society as a whole. Yet each detective fulfills a certain cultural role that speaks to the specific problems of his or her era, proving that masculinity is a more fluid role than many have previously credited. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3971/
The Development of Don Juan as a Dramatic Character Before 1800
This thesis examines the myth and legend of Don Juan and the development of the dramatic character prior to 1800. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130336/
The Development of Dramatic Exposition in the Plays of George Farquhar
The purpose of this thesis is to make further contribution in filling the gap in detailed analyses of George Farquhar's plays. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130605/
The Development of the Concept of the Image of the City in the Critical Works of Charles Williams
This thesis explores the themes of City and love in the novels and poetry of Charles Williams. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130577/
The Development of the Heroine in the American Novel from 1850 to 1900
There are many heroines in American fiction, and in this thesis I have tried to show the development of the characterization of women in the American novel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83409/
The Development of the Religious Thought of T. S. Eliot
This thesis will concern itself with the development of the religious thought of Eliot as it is expressed in his poetry and plays. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163911/
The Development of the Unheroic Hero in the Modern Novel
This thesis explores the development of the unheroic hero in the modern novel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130337/
The Devil in Legend and Literature
The purpose of this paper is to trace some of the accepted characteristics of the devil to their origins through a study of folklore and ancient religions. The characteristics include the principal form taken by each devil and trace its beginnings through folklore; the animals connected with these devils; powers allotted to these devils; and purposes served by these devils. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130483/
Dialect Preterites and Past Participles in the North Central States and Upper Midwest : A Generative Analysis
This paper will propose a generative analysis of McDavid's dialect verb forms. The concepts of Chomsky and Halle as presented in SPE form the framework for this study. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131644/
Differences in Katherine Mansfield and Anton Chekhov as Short Story Writers
The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of Katherine Mansfield's literary indebtedness to Anton Chekhov. Throughout the critical writing about Mansfield there are many suggestions that her work is similar to that of Chekhov, but, these allusions are, for the most part, vague in pointing out specific likenesses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108123/
Directed Reading toward Self-Understanding for Adolescents: a Teacher's Guide
This thesis provides annotations for contemporary adolescent novels for the purpose of serving as a guide for English teachers in the individual selection of novels for outside reading by adolescents in grades nine, ten, eleven, and twelve. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131163/
"Distance" and Other Stories
"Distance" and Other Stories is a collection of four short stories and a novella that explore the themes of isolation and personal revelation. The dissertation opens with a preface which describes my background as a writer and the forces that shape my work, including science fiction, technology and the internet, cultural marginalization, and Joseph Campbell's hero's motif. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4621/
Distances
I provide in my preface a brief account of my development as a creative writer. Through this development I draw an analogy to the evolution of modern science by stating that my need for personal clarity is analogous to the charge for empirical clarity of modern science. Furthermore, I contrast the objectivism of modern science to the subjectivism of creative writing. The four short stories in my thesis range from a semi-autobiographical story, to two short stories that stem out further and further from the subjective origin of the first story. The story of greatest distance is “Fireflies,” which is not semi-autobiographical, but pure fiction. The final short story returns to the subjective origin of the first. The drive of Distances is thereby to create a sort parabola: a subjective, semi-autobiographical origin, to an objective, purely fictional crest, then a return to that subjective, semi-autobiographical origin. The entire collection is a holistic, ultimately subjective, and therefore personal experience; yet, through the use certain tropes,metaphors others can relate to, the stories are paradoxically sharable. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3675/
Distorted traditions: The use of the grotesque in the short fiction of Eudora Welty, Carson McCullers, Flannery O'Connor, and Bobbie Ann Mason.
This dissertation argues that the four writers named above use the grotesque to illustrate the increasingly peculiar consequences of the assault of modernity on traditional Southern culture. The basic conflict between the views of Bakhtin and Kayser provides the foundation for defining the grotesque herein, and Geoffrey Harpham's concept of "margins" helps to define interior and exterior areas for the discussion. Chapter 1 lays a foundation for why the South is different from other regions of America, emphasizing the influences of Anglo-Saxon culture and traditions brought to these shores by the English gentlemen who settled the earliest tidewater colonies as well as the later influx of Scots-Irish immigrants (the Celtic-Southern thesis) who settled the Piedmont and mountain regions. This chapter also notes that part of the South's peculiarity derives from the cultural conflicts inherent between these two groups. Chapters 2 through 5 analyze selected short fiction from each of these respective authors and offer readings that explain how the grotesque relates to the drastic social changes taking place over the half-century represented by these authors. Chapter 6 offers an evaluation of how and why such traditions might be preserved. The overall argument suggests that traditional Southern culture grows out of four foundations, i. e., devotion to one's community, devotion to one's family, devotion to God, and love of place. As increasing modernization and homogenization impact the South, these cultural foundations have been systematically replaced by unsatisfactory or confusing substitutes, thereby generating something arguably grotesque. Through this exchange, the grotesque has moved from the observably physical, as shown in the earlier works discussed, to something internalized that is ultimately depicted through a kind of intellectual if not physical stasis, as shown through the later works. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4591/
The Distribution of Prepositions in English Adverbial Phrases
This thesis describes the rules of prepositions in English adverbial phrases. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130694/
Divine and the Everyday Devil (Short Stories)
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Divine and the Everyday Devil contains a scholarly preface that discusses the experiences and literary works that influenced the author's writing with special attention in regards to spirituality and sexuality. The preface is followed by six original short stories. "Evil" is a work addressing a modern conception of evil. "Eschatology" concerns a man facing his own mortality. "The Gospel of Peter" tells the story of a husband grappling with his wife's religious beliefs. "The Mechanics of Projects" relates the experiences of a woman looking for love in Mexico. "The Rocky Normal Show" involves a husband growing apart from his wife and "Mutant: An Origin Story" is about a teenager trying to find his own unique identity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4159/
The Divine Comedy as a Source for the Poetry of T. S. Eliot
In spite of the large amount of criticism written about T. S. Eliot, no attempt has been made to point out the great debt that Eliot owes to Dante Alighieri, and the pervasive influence of The Divine Comedy on Eliot's poetical works. This thesis endeavors to illustrate the extent of that debt and influence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130396/
Dominant Themes in the Novels of Ernest Hemingway
This thesis proposes to show that Hemingway's novels reveal a change of attitude which culminates in an increased faith in the ultimate goodness and dignity of man. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130454/
Don Juan in Hell: a Key to Reading Shaw
Since George Bernard Shaw claims that the third act of Man and Superman is a complete commentary on his philosophy, this thesis is a revealing of the philosophy demonstrated in the Dream Scene, and it is an intensive study of the third act based upon a reading of the play. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130466/
Dostoevsky and the Irresistible Idea
The primary goal of this paper is to investigate the phenomenon of a dream, a desire, or an idea transpiring in the thoughts of an individual, growing in importance to the individual, and finally becoming an idée fixe, or irresistible idea, which cannot be suppressed by the individual. The investigation will be concerned with the two of Dostoevsky's heroes who best exemplify the phenomenon. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163918/
Dostoevsky's Conception of Love
This thesis looks at Dostoevsky's conception of love as demonstrated in his novels. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130630/
Dostoyevsky: a Resource for Modern Youth
This thesis looks at two questions regarding the teaching of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's works in high school and junior college: which of Dostoyevsky's works should be used, and what materials in those works selected should one consider most necessary for emphasis in the actual teaching of the works. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131165/
Dostoyevsky and the Slavophiles
Just to what degree Dostoyevsky's thoughts paralleled those of the Slavophiles will be outlined in subsequent chapters in three major areas--Orthodoxy, Autocracy, and Nationality. Uvarov's old 1828 formula provides a simple outline in which to describe and compare the more complicated core of Dostoyevskyan and Slavophile philosophy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131289/
Dostoyevsky's American Reputation to 1930
Undoubtedly, Dostoyevsky's influence upon the novel is great, but, even yet, few concrete studies have been made and no full-length study has been published. It is hoped that this account of Dostoyevsky's reputation in America during the 1920's will be of assistance in the greater task of tracing Dostoyevsky's influence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108135/
The Drama of George Farquhar.
This thesis explores the characters, themes, and comic devices used in the drama of George Farquhar. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130572/
Dramatic Experiment in the Plays of Eugene O'Neill
This survey of Eugene O'Neill's works attempts to establish that fact that he used a number of dramatic experiments in his plays and that he used them successfully. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75286/
A Drop of Oil
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Many Christian writers point to God through their fiction without openly evangelizing. The images their words evoke lift their secular and religious readers' heads, for God is reflected in their use of language, the emotions they describe, and the actions of their characters. The preface and short stories in this collection aim to show that God's presence can be felt even when people are suffering due to human decisions and mistakes. He is with His creations in the midst of their pain to impart hope when they need it most. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4739/
The Early Criticisms of Shelley in England and America
It is the principal purpose of this study of the early criticisms of Shelley to contrast the opinions of him in England and America and to find reasons for the widely divergent attitudes of the reviewers in the two countries. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83583/
The Eccentrics of Tobias Smollett's Novels
Tobias Smollet's purpose in writing was twofold: to entertain the reader and to satirize man and his society. To accomplish his aim, the author created eccentric personalities in the old Elizabethan humour convention. This thesis looks at Smollet's characterizations, especially of the eccentrics, in his novels. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130479/
Edgar Allan Poe in Relation to his Times
This study is based upon the prose works of Poe and covers the topis of politics and social reforms, contemporary attitudes toward death, customs, science and pseudo-science, and contemporary literature. The thesis attempts to prove that Poe's works show manifest evidences of his being a product of his times. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70285/
Eight Original Short Stories : "A Rotten Way of Life" and Others
This thesis is a creative one, comprised of eight short stories which deal with a variety of subjects. All of the material is concerned with personal or vicarious experience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131347/
Elements of Old English Prosody in the Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins
This thesis attempts to explain the Anglo-Saxon influence on Hopkins's poetry by providing a biographical study of his life to determine when he acquired knowledge of the Anglo-Saxon. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131186/
Elements of the Byronic Hero in Captain Ahab
This study of the elements of the Byronic hero in Herman Melville's Captain Ahab includes a look at the Byronic hero and Byron himself, the Byronic hero and the Gothic tradition, the Byronic hero and his "humanities," and the Byronic hero and Prometheus-Lucifer. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163945/