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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: English
Alfred Edward Housman (1859-1936) the Man and His Work

Alfred Edward Housman (1859-1936) the Man and His Work

Date: August 1962
Creator: Smith, Mary M.
Description: The purpose of this thesis is to "delve into the life and poetry of A. E. Housman to try to discover, not what made Housman the man he was, but why his poetry has appeal." p. 3
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Alienation and Reconciliation in the Novels of John Steinbeck

Alienation and Reconciliation in the Novels of John Steinbeck

Date: May 1964
Creator: McDaniel, Barbara Albrecht
Description: The purpose of this study is to show how, in a world with a system of values based on love, the characters in the novels of John Steinbeck are alienated and reconciled.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Always Painting the Future: Utopian Desire and the Women's Movement in Selected Works by United States Female Writers at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Always Painting the Future: Utopian Desire and the Women's Movement in Selected Works by United States Female Writers at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Date: August 2009
Creator: Balic, Iva
Description: This study explores six utopias by female authors written at the turn of the twentieth century: Mary Bradley Lane's Mizora (1881), Alice Ilgenfritz Jones and Ella Merchant's Unveiling Parallel (1893), Eloise O. Richberg's Reinstern (1900), Lena J. Fry's Other Worlds (1905), Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland (1915), and Martha Bensley Bruère's Mildred Carver, USA (1919). While the right to vote had become the central, most important point of the movement, women were concerned with many other issues affecting their lives. Positioned within the context of the late nineteenth century women's rights movement, this study examines these "sideline" concerns of the movement such as home and gender-determined spheres, motherhood, work, marriage, independence, and self-sufficiency and relates them to the transforming character of female identity at the time. The study focuses primarily on analyzing the expression of female historical desire through utopian genre and on explicating the contradictory nature of utopian production.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ambivalence in the Poetry of Robert Frost

Ambivalence in the Poetry of Robert Frost

Date: August 1967
Creator: White, Patricia F.
Description: In this thesis an attempt will be made to demonstrate the existence and significance of some of the opposite pulls evidenced in Frost's poetry and to delineate some of the important areas in which they occur.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
American Background in Longfellow's "The Song of Hiawatha"

American Background in Longfellow's "The Song of Hiawatha"

Date: 1940
Creator: Doty, Fern Marie
Description: The background for "The Song of Hiawatha" is explicitly American, for Longfellow has preserved many legends, traditions, and customs of the aborigines with fidelity. As a whole, "The Song of Hiawatha" is a successful delineation of the aborigines of North America. Longfellow preserved the most interesting legends and supplemented them with accounts of Indian life.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The American Businessman in the Novels and Stories of Henry James

The American Businessman in the Novels and Stories of Henry James

Date: August 1969
Creator: Smith, Margaret Hart
Description: The critical interest in Henry James and his relationship with the "Gilded Age," or the "golden age of American business," indicates that a chronological study of the American businessman, as this character appears in James's fiction, may have some value. The term businessman in this study will simply be understood to mean a maker of money. To consider in detail all of James's writings would exceed the scope of this study; only those novels and stories which deal most obviously and directly with American businessmen will be included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The American Eve: Gender, Tragedy, and the American Dream

The American Eve: Gender, Tragedy, and the American Dream

Date: May 1993
Creator: Long, Kim Martin
Description: America has adopted as its own the Eden myth, which has provided the mythology of the American dream. This New Garden of America, consequently, has been a masculine garden because of its dependence on the myth of the Fall. Implied in the American dream is the idea of a garden without Eve, or at least without Eve's sin, traditionally associated with sexuality. Our canonical literature has reflected these attitudes of devaluing feminine power or making it a negative force: The Scarlet Letter, Moby-Dick, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, and The Sound and the Fury. To recreate the Garden myth, Americans have had to reimagine Eve as the idealized virgin, earth mother and life-giver, or as Adam's loyal helpmeet, the silent figurehead. But Eve resists her new roles: Hester Prynne embellishes her scarlet letter and does not leave Boston; the feminine forces in Moby-Dick defeat the monomaniacal masculinity of Ahab; Miss Watson, the Widow Douglas, and Aunt Sally's threat of civilization chase Huck off to the territory despite the beckoning of the feminine river; Daisy retreats unscathed into her "white palace" after Gatsby's death; and Caddy tours Europe on the arm of a Nazi officer long after Quentin's suicide, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
American Grotesque from Nineteenth Century to Modernism: the Latter's Acceptance of the Exceptional

American Grotesque from Nineteenth Century to Modernism: the Latter's Acceptance of the Exceptional

Date: August 1994
Creator: Kisawadkorn, Kriengsak
Description: This dissertation explores a history of the grotesque and its meaning in art and literature along with those of its related term, the arabesque, since their co-existence, specifically in literature, is later treated by a well-known nineteenth-century American writer in Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque- Theories or views of the grotesque (used in literature), both in Europe and America, belong to twelve theorists of different eras, ranging from the sixteenth century to the present period, especially Modernism (approximately from 1910 to 1945)--Rabelais, Hegel, Scott, Wright, Hugo, Symonds, Ruskin, Santayana, Kayser, Bakhtin, (William Van) O'Connor, and Spiegel. My study examines the grotesque in American literature, as treated by both nineteenth-century writers--Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, and, significantly, by modernist writers--Anderson, West, and Steinbeck in Northern (or non-Southern) literature; Faulkner, McCullers, and (Flannery) O'Connor in Southern literature. I survey several novels and short stories of these American writers for their grotesqueries in characterization and episodes. The grotesque, as treated by these earlier American writers is often despised, feared, or mistrusted by other characters, but is the opposite in modernist fiction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The American in the Novels of Henry James

The American in the Novels of Henry James

Date: 1949
Creator: Speegle, Katherine Sloan
Description: For the purpose of analyzing James' interpretation of the American character, it is first necessary to study his individual Americans.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
American Literary Pragmatism : Lighting Out for the Territory

American Literary Pragmatism : Lighting Out for the Territory

Date: August 1998
Creator: England, Peter S. (Peter Shands)
Description: This thesis discusses pragmatist philosophy in the nineteenth century and its effect on American literature of the time.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries