You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of History
 Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
American Ambassadorial Representation to England from John Adams to Charles Francis Adams

American Ambassadorial Representation to England from John Adams to Charles Francis Adams

Date: 1945
Creator: Parker, Mary Lois
Description: This thesis outlines the history of American ambassadorial representation in England through 1868.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
American Artillery in the Mexican War 1846-1847

American Artillery in the Mexican War 1846-1847

Date: May 1969
Creator: Dillon, Lester R.
Description: This thesis presents a history of the United States' war with Mexico with a focus on the maturing of the United States artillery on the battlefields of Mexico.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
American Blitzkrieg: Courtney Hodges and the Advance Toward Aachen (August 1 - September 12, 1944)

American Blitzkrieg: Courtney Hodges and the Advance Toward Aachen (August 1 - September 12, 1944)

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2012
Creator: Rinkleff, Adam J.
Description: This is an analysis of combat operations of US First Army under the command of Courtney Hodges, between August 1 and September 12, 1944, with an emphasis upon 1st, 4th, 9th, and 30th Divisions. However, other formations are necessarily discussed in order to maintain context. Indeed, many historians have failed to emphasize the complex interdependent nature of these efforts, and the traditional narrative has been distorted by inadequate situational awareness. This study argues that the army's operations were exceedingly difficult, resulting in approximately 40,000 casualties over a six week period. Although historians claim that the Germans were essentially defeated by the end of July, and that the Allied advance was subsequently halted by logistical difficulties, the official combat records clarify that logistical shortages were a tertiary factor, as the enemy remained capable of strong resistance. Consequently, defensive efforts were the primary factor hindering the advance, in conjunction with deteriorating weather conditions, rugged terrain, and surprisingly severe traffic congestion. Although this was mobile warfare, military theorists have overestimated the effectiveness of mechanization and underestimated the potential for antitank defenses. Ultimately, this study asserts that First Army was the primary American combat formation, and historians have exaggerated the importance of George Patton's ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The American doctrine for the use of naval gunfire in support of amphibious landings: Myth vs. reality in the Central Pacific of World War II.

The American doctrine for the use of naval gunfire in support of amphibious landings: Myth vs. reality in the Central Pacific of World War II.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2006
Creator: Mitchener, Donald Keith
Description: The United States Marine Corps and the United States Navy developed during the interwar period a doctrine that addressed the problems inherent in the substitution of naval gunfire for artillery support in an amphibious assault. The invasion of Betio Islet, Tarawa Atoll, in November of 1943 was the first test of this doctrine. It has been said many times since the war that the doctrine basically passed this test and that lessons learned at Tarawa increased the efficiency with which the Marine Corps and Navy applied the prewar doctrine during the rest of the war. An analysis of the planning and execution of naval bombardments in the Central Pacific Campaign, after the invasion of the Gilberts, does not support this claim. This analysis leads the researcher to three conclusions. First, the Japanese developed defenses against many of the effects of the gunfire support doctrine that blunted much of the force of American firepower. American planners were slow to recognize the implications of these changes and, consequently, were slow to react to them. Second, many naval commanders responsible for providing naval gunfire support for Central Pacific operations still equated tonnage of ordnance to effectiveness of bombardment, regardless of their frequent references ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
American Influence on the French Revolution

American Influence on the French Revolution

Date: 1949
Creator: Holladay, Joe T.
Description: This thesis examines some of the influences America had on France in the late eighteenth century, and argues that they contributed to the French Revolution.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
American Interests in the Cuban Revolt, 1868-1878

American Interests in the Cuban Revolt, 1868-1878

Date: August 1954
Creator: Watkins, Holland Dempsey
Description: This thesis describes the Cuban revolt of 1868-1878 and the interest it caused in the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
American Public Opinion During Crises in Japanese-American Relations in the Early Twentieth Century

American Public Opinion During Crises in Japanese-American Relations in the Early Twentieth Century

Date: August 1968
Creator: Nelson, Donald Fowler.
Description: Throughout the period following Pearl Harbor, as one crisis in Japanese-American relations followed another, the American public opinion was divided. Some newspapers and personalities feared that there would be war over the San Francisco school board crisis, while others believed that talk of war was ridiculous. Partisan politics often affected the course of affairs on the Japanese question.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Americanization of the Hawaiians

The Americanization of the Hawaiians

Date: 1944
Creator: Anderson, Olive
Description: This thesis is a study of the Americanization of the Hawaiians.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Americans Who Would Not Wait:  The American Legion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915-1917

Americans Who Would Not Wait: The American Legion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915-1917

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Libraries.
Date: August 2012
Creator: Smylie, Eric Paul
Description: This dissertation examines the five battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force designated as the American Legion. Authorized in Canada between 1915 and 1917, these units were formed to recruit volunteers from the United States to serve in the Canadian Overseas Contingent during the First World War. This work reviews the organization of Canada’s militia and the history of Anglo-American relations before examining the Canadian war effort, the formation of the American Legion, the background of its men, and the diplomatic, political, and constitutional questions that it raised. Much of the research focuses on the internal documents of its individual battalions (the 97th, 211th, 212th, 213th and 237th) and the papers of Reverend Charles Bullock now housed at the Public Archives of Canada. Documentation for the diplomatic furor the American Legion caused comes largely through the published diplomatic documents, British Foreign Office records held at the Public Record Office at Kew, and United States Department of State files at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. The most useful sources for American Legion correspondence are the Beaverbrook papers held at the House of Lords Record Office, the papers of Canadian Prime Minister Sir Robert Laird Borden, and those of the Governor-General, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
America's Postwar Settlement : Dollar Diplomacy in Europe, 1919-1925

America's Postwar Settlement : Dollar Diplomacy in Europe, 1919-1925

Date: January 1970
Creator: Naberhaus, William J.
Description: Prosperity was the positive goal of America's postwar policy. For several years, the United States was successful in her attempt to be at the same time politically aloof and economically opportunistic. But politics and economics were radically intertwined in the reparation settlement, and when reparations interfered with the prosperity of the Atlantic community, it shattered as well America's resolve to "let Europe stew in her own juice," and caused American reinvolvement in European concerns. America's postwar settlement can be expressed in two words: disentanglement frustrated.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries