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  Access Rights: Use restricted to UNT Community
  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Applied Technology, Training and Development
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The relationship between the reasons for participation in continuing professional education and the leader effectiveness of first-line supervisors.

The relationship between the reasons for participation in continuing professional education and the leader effectiveness of first-line supervisors.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2003
Creator: McCamey, Randy B.
Description: This research examined the reasons for participation in continuing professional education (CPE) and the predictive relationship of those motivational reasons to the perceived leadership effectiveness of first-line supervisors. For this study, 105 first-line supervisors were surveyed from four electric utility companies. Input was also collected from each supervisor's subordinate employees. Using the five motivational reasons for participation, collected via the Participation Reasons Scale and the effectiveness score collected using the Leader Behavior Analysis IIĀ®, regression techniques were used to asses the data. The five participation reasons of the PRS were regressed individually against the effectiveness scores to determine the extent to which leader effectiveness could be predicted by the participation reasons. In each case, the null hypothesis failed to be rejected. Regression of the five PRS reasons collectively on leader effectiveness also failed to reject the null, producing a p value of .800 and an R2 value of .023. An "all possible subsets" regression was conducted to determine whether a smaller subset of the five predictor variables might improve the predictive value of the participation reasons. No subset improved the predictive value. This study concludes that motivation to participate in CPE does not predict leader effectiveness. Thus, training organizations do ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The relationship between training in learning style adaptation and successful completion of entry-level community college classes.

The relationship between training in learning style adaptation and successful completion of entry-level community college classes.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Ferrell, Dawn M.
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between training in learning style adaptation and successful completion of community college courses. The rationale for conducting this study was based on the need for students to learn how to adapt their learning style in order to more effectively learn in any situation. It is also important that community colleges implement strategies that assist in student retention. The learning styles of entry-level community college students were measured using Kolb's Learning Style Inventory Version 3. Students enrolled in entry-level college courses at a small North Texas community college were studied. The Chi-square Test of Independence with a 2 x 2 design was employed. Findings indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in the relationship between students receiving training in learning styles adaptation and successful completion of entry-level college courses, and that students who attended a learning styles training session and those who did not attend a learning styles training session had an equal chance of succeeding in entry-level community college courses. Findings also indicated that students with Accommodating and Assimilating learning styles are less likely to successfully complete an entry-level college course than are students with Diverging ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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