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Scientific Considerations of Olestra as a Fat Substitute

Scientific Considerations of Olestra as a Fat Substitute

Date: December 1999
Creator: Rattagool, Kullakan
Description: Olestra is, a sucrose polyester, a noncaloric fat substitute, made from sucrose and several fatty acid esters. It has been approved by the FDA as a food additive used in preparing low-fat deep-frying foods such as savory snacks. Available literature on olestra was evaluated that had both positive and negative connotations. Clinical trials in numerous species of animals including humans were conducted to determine if olestra would affect the utilization and absorption of macro- and micronutrients; the effects of olestra on growth, reproduction, or its toxicity were also examined. The roles of olestra as a fat substitute, how it could effect on humans and the environment, and the potential impacts from its use in large amounts were assessed. Olestra can be removed from the environment by aerobic bacteria and fungi which may be isolated from activated sludge and soils.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
SIG Annual Activities Report and SIG-Of-The-Year Criteria and Checklist: International Information Issues (SIG-III)

SIG Annual Activities Report and SIG-Of-The-Year Criteria and Checklist: International Information Issues (SIG-III)

Date: 2012
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Description: Report on the annual activities from 2011-2012 for the Special Interest Group for International Information Issues (SIG-III) and the SIG-of-the-Year criteria and checklist.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Animals-as-Trope in the Selected Fiction of Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison

Animals-as-Trope in the Selected Fiction of Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 1999
Creator: Erickson, Stacy M.
Description: In this dissertation, I show how 20th century African-American women writers such as Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison utilize animals-as-trope in order to illustrate the writers' humanity and literary vision. In the texts that I have selected, I have found that animals-as-trope functions in two important ways: the first function of animal as trope is a pragmatic one, which serves to express the humanity of African Americans; and the second function of animal tropes in African-American women's fiction is relational and expresses these writers' "ethic of caring" that stems from their folk and womanist world view. Found primarily in slave narratives and in domestic fiction of the 19th and early 20th centuries, pragmatic animal metaphors and/or similes provide direct analogies between the treatment of African-Americans and animals. Here, these writers often engage in rhetoric that challenges pro-slavery apologists, who attempted to disprove the humanity of African-Americans by portraying them as animals fit to be enslaved. Animals, therefore, become the metaphor of both the abolitionist and the slavery apologist for all that is not human. The second function of animals-as-trope in the fiction of African-American women writers goes beyond the pragmatic goal of proving African-Americans's common humanity, even ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The implications of national culture on American knowledge work teams: A model of a collaborative corporate culture to support team functioning

The implications of national culture on American knowledge work teams: A model of a collaborative corporate culture to support team functioning

Date: December 1999
Creator: Bussey, Jennifer Amy
Description: In order to remain competitive, many American businesses implement team-based work strategies. In many cases, however, teams fail in American organizations, which may be in part due to a conflict between American culture and the cooperative environment necessary for teams to function effectively. By comparing the literature regarding American culture, challenges faced by teams, and then corporate culture, it becomes evident that there are aspects of American culture that pose challenges but also that an appropriate corporate culture can mediate some areas of incompatibility. A collaborative corporate culture can induce cooperation among employees without asking employees to work in a manner that is counterintuitive, thus gaining the benefits of teams.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A structural equation model of contributing factors to adolescent social interest

A structural equation model of contributing factors to adolescent social interest

Date: August 1999
Creator: Craig, Stephen E.
Description: The focus of the present study was to test through SEM the relationships between family influences (FI) and school influences (SI) on factors hypothesized to be associated with adolescent social interest: school belonging (SB), extracurricular participation (EP), and peer/romantic involvement (PRI). The final model consisted of FI and SI that contributed to the expression of adolescent social interest. FI included parental communication and parental caring. SI consisted of teacher fairness. SB consisted of a child's self-reported feelings of belonging at school, EP included self-reported involvement in sports or academic clubs, and PRI consisted of self-reported desire for romantic involvement or desire for participation with others. The proposed model suggested that FI contributed significantly to self-reported SB, EP, and PRI. Additionally, it was hypothesized that SI would contribute significantly to SB and EP, but not to PRI. The data used in the current study were part of an existing data set collected as part of the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health. The total sample size for the present study was 2,561 male and female adolescents aged 12-19 years. The data consisted of adolescent and parent self-report information. Results suggested a significant relationship between FI and self-reported SB and PRI. As ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Toward an Ecofeminist Environmental Jurisprudence: Nature, Law, and Gender

Toward an Ecofeminist Environmental Jurisprudence: Nature, Law, and Gender

Date: August 1999
Creator: Mallory, Chaone
Description: This thesis develops a legal theory reflecting the insights of feminism and environmental philosophy. I argue that human beings are not ontologically separate, but embedded in webs of relationality with natural others. My primary purposes are to 1) delineate ways in which institutions of modernity (such as law and science) have precipitated ecosocial crisis through the attempt to dialectically enforce mastery and control over nature and women; and 2) explore alternate political forms and ontologies which challenge the classical liberalist view of the (human) individual as a radically isolated, discrete, autonomous being. My overarching theme is that law functions as a narrative that can both hinder and enhance the promotion of ecological ideas, and how ecofeminism can contribute to transformative projects of environmental philosophy and feminist law.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Distributed Digital Preservation ETD Workshop

Distributed Digital Preservation ETD Workshop

Date: September 16, 2011
Creator: McMillan, Gail & Halbert, Martin
Description: This presentation is designed to provide institutions with Electronic Theses and Dissertation (ETD) initiatives with information about preserving ETDs. In this presentation, the authors discuss ETDs and preservation needs, MetaArchive and distributed preservation, Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD)/MetaArchive ETD DDPN Archive, collections management for preservation, MetaArchive and its member roles and responsibilities, and the ETD Lifecycle Management Project.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Measuring the Impact of Preserving Digital Assets

Measuring the Impact of Preserving Digital Assets

Date: June 13, 2012
Creator: Belden, Dreanna & Murray, Kathleen R.
Description: This presentation discusses measuring the impact of preserving digital assets. This presentation reports the initial findings of a study of the impact of digitizing assets, specifically: (a) a framework of impact areas and indicators and (b) findings for the Portal's content partners and users.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Southwest Retort, Volume 6, Number 1, October 1953

Southwest Retort, Volume 6, Number 1, October 1953

Date: October 1953
Creator: American Chemical Society. Dallas/Fort Worth Section.
Description: This publication of the Dallas-Fort Worth Section of the American Chemical Society includes information about research, prominent scientist, organizational business, and various other stories of interest to the community. Published monthly during long academic semesters.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Southwest Retort, Volume 5, Number 6, March 1953

Southwest Retort, Volume 5, Number 6, March 1953

Date: March 1953
Creator: American Chemical Society. Dallas/Fort Worth Section.
Description: This publication of the Dallas-Fort Worth Section of the American Chemical Society includes information about research, prominent scientist, organizational business, and various other stories of interest to the community. Published monthly during long academic semesters.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries