You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion and Recreation
An Assessment of College Students' Attitudes and Empathy toward Rape

An Assessment of College Students' Attitudes and Empathy toward Rape

Date: December 1998
Creator: Burke, Sloane C. (Sloane Christine)
Description: The purpose of this study was to assess rape attitudes and empathy levels of students at a university in North Texas. The Attitudes Toward Rape questionnaire and the Rape Empathy Scale were administered to 387 undergraduate students. Dependent variables were attitudes and empathy and independent variables were prior knowledge or experience as a rape victim, having female siblings, gender, marital status, and age. Significance was found between rape-intolerant attitudes and both prior experience as a victim (p < .001), and gender (p < .001). Significance was also found between empathy and experience as a rape victim (p < .035) and gender (p < .032).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Project PACE on Adolescent Females' Physical Activity Readiness

The Effects of Project PACE on Adolescent Females' Physical Activity Readiness

Date: May 1998
Creator: Williams, Christy Nicole
Description: This study evaluated the effects of Project PACE, a program designed to increase physical activity, on the physical activity level and selected psychosocial variables of sedentary adolescent females ages 12 to 18. Psychosocial variables included self efficacy, attitude, perception of barriers, perceived social support, and knowledge. Of the 69 participants, 40 were enrolled in the treatment group and 29 were enrolled in the control group at the start of the study. The only significant differences were found for attitudes towards physical activity at base line. Findings from this study suggest that implementation of Project PACE protocol in school settings may produce some positive effects, but no significant findings were detected.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effect of Running Speed on VO2 Kinetics in the Severe Exercise Domain

The Effect of Running Speed on VO2 Kinetics in the Severe Exercise Domain

Date: December 1997
Creator: Williams, Christine Suzanne
Description: There has been an interest in the kinetics of the V02 response during exercise at various intensities. However, most studies focus on the response of submaximal intensities whereas few studies have examined V02 kinetics at severe intensities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exercise intensity on V02 kinetics over a range of severe intensities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Video-Computerized Feedback on Competitive State Anxiety, Self-Efficacy, Effort, and Baseball Hitting-Task Performance

The Effects of Video-Computerized Feedback on Competitive State Anxiety, Self-Efficacy, Effort, and Baseball Hitting-Task Performance

Date: December 1998
Creator: Leslie, P. Jason
Description: This study examined the effects of frame-by-frame video-computerized feedback on competitive state anxiety, self-efficacy, effort, and baseball performance of high school players. Players were randomly assigned to one of three feedback conditions: (a) Hitting score, (b) Hitting score and frame-by-frame analysis of a mechanically correct swing, (c) Hitting score and frame-by-frame analysis of participant's swing and a mechanically correct swing. Once per week for six weeks, the players completed three questionnaires: (a) Hitting Self-Efficacy Scale, (b) Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2C, and (c) Performance Effort Scale, and performed a hitting task. Results of the 3 (Group) x 6 (Trials) ANOVAs revealed no significant effects. This study does not support previous confidence-baseball hitting research.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Do American Adults Know How to Exercise for a Health Benefit?

Do American Adults Know How to Exercise for a Health Benefit?

Date: December 1998
Creator: Krzewinski-Malone, Jeanette A. (Jeanette Aileen)
Description: Approximately 950,000 Americans die annually from cardiovascular disease. Physical activity is a major risk factor for the development of CVD and a risk factor for stroke. The purpose of this research was to determine whether American adults know how to exercise to achieve health benefits and whether this knowledge is a function of demographics. Items included knowledge of exercise guidelines and knowledge of traditional and non-traditional exercise activities. This information was obtained from 22 questions that were a part of a larger national survey of 2,002 American households. Statistical analyses of this sample, indicate American adults have knowledge which varies by demographic groups. Data revealed that overall the 61+, Less than High School, African-American, Hispanic-American, and Male groups have the least amount of knowledge about exercise. These data can provide health educators with important aspects of exercise knowledge for future health promotions/interventions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Significance of Time to Exhaustion at the Velocity at VO2Max

The Significance of Time to Exhaustion at the Velocity at VO2Max

Date: May 1998
Creator: Ehler, Karen
Description: There were two primary goals in this investigation. The first goal was to determine if inter-individual variability in time to exhaustion at the velocity associated with V02max (Tlim at Vmax) was explained by anaerobic capacity (AC), Vmax, anaerobic threshold (AT), and/or a combination variable in the form [AC • (Vmax - vAT)^-1]. The second goal was to determine if AC could be predicted from Tlim at Vmax, AT, and/or a combination variable in the form [Tlim • (Vmax - vAT)].
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Students' and Teachers' Perspective of Purposes for Engaging in Physical Activity

Students' and Teachers' Perspective of Purposes for Engaging in Physical Activity

Date: August 1994
Creator: Thomason, Jonathan E.
Description: Purposes for engaging in physical activities were examined from the perspective of university students enrolled in physical activity classes and kinesiology faculty. Data was collected from 473 students and 20 faculty members. Both groups completed the Personal Purposes and Meanings in Movement Inventory (PPMMI). Independent t-tests were conducted for each of the twenty-two purpose statements to determine differences between faculty and students in the rating of purposes. Students attending individual sport activity classes rated self-knowledge, transcendence, object projection/reception, awareness, competition, neuromuscular efficiency, movement appreciation, and muscular strength significantly lower (p<.01) than the faculty. Students attending team sport activities rated self-knowledge, transcendence, participation, object projection/reception, teamwork, awareness, competition, leadership, and expression significantly (pc.01) lower than the faculty. Students attending fitness activity classes rated self-knowledge, competition, leadership, transcendence, participation, teamwork, circulo-respiratory efficiency, and personal integration significantly (p<.01) lower than faculty.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Psychological Effects of a Therapeutic Camping Experience on First Time Campers with Spina Bifida

The Psychological Effects of a Therapeutic Camping Experience on First Time Campers with Spina Bifida

Date: December 1994
Creator: Burns, Joanna L. (Joanna Lynn Brannan)
Description: Camping has been identified as a resource for educational, therapeutic, and recreational growth. The purpose of this study was to determine the psychosocial effects of a therapeutic camping experience with first time campers with spina bifida. In this study with four first time campers with spina bifida, three areas related to the camp experience were observed and measured: recreation participation, fun/pleasure, and self esteem. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used, including the Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory, the Recreation Participation and Fun Inventory, participant and non-participant observations, interviews, and a counselor questionnaire. The measurements of self esteem, recreation participation, and fun/pleasure were taken at three intervals, before camp, during camp and three weeks following the camp experience. The four camper case studies demonstrated that each camper experienced his/her own unique first time camp experiences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of a College Human Sexuality Course on Students' Sexual Knowledge, Attitude, and Behavior.

The Effects of a College Human Sexuality Course on Students' Sexual Knowledge, Attitude, and Behavior.

Date: December 2001
Creator: Smith, Jolene A.
Description: Using an experimental-comparison group design, data were collected at the beginning and end of a semester to assess the effect of a human sexuality course on students' sexual knowledge, sexual attitude, and sexual behaviors. Data analysis by t-tests showed statistical differences between the experimental and comparison group only on sexual knowledge scores ( p < .001), with the experimental group scoring higher. T-tests showed statistical difference between males and females in sexual attitude (p< .001) and sexual behavior (p< .001) with women scoring higher than men in the experimental group, and also when experimental and control groups were combined. Although not statistically significant, women scored higher in sexual knowledge than males.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Motivational and Instructional Self Talk on the Attentional Focus of High School Distance Runners.

The Effects of Motivational and Instructional Self Talk on the Attentional Focus of High School Distance Runners.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Burgess, Amber G.
Description: The purposes of this study were to examine the (a) attentional focus strategies used by high school distance runners, (b) changes in attentional focus across four laps in three 1.6 km runs, and (c) effects of a pre-performance intervention using motivational and instructional self talk on the attentional focus strategies used by and performance of high school distance runners. Participants (N = 42) completed a background and demographic questionnaire, the Cross Country Attentional Focus Inventory (CCAFI), a motivational and instructional statement survey, and the Self-Motivation Inventory. A series of oneway ANOVAs revealed significant differences in the types of attentional strategies used by each group, as well as fluctuations in use of strategies. The experimental group associated more during the each of the 1.6 km trials, whereas the control group dissociated more throughout each trial. A significant group by week interaction was found, with the experimental group maintaining their performance and the control group slowing from week one to week three.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries