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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: School of Visual Arts
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Art museum resources and teacher use.
I proposed that both Bruner's (1963) idea of the spiral curriculum and Yenawine's (1992) theories of teaching for visual literacy in the museum set the stage for significant learning for students when used together. If school teachers lay a foundation of knowledge about a museum object, especially through museum resources, then the student may transform and apply this 'prior knowledge' (explicit memories from the classroom) while on the museum visit tour. When docents utilize Yenawine's (1992) methods toward the goal of visual literacy, the semantic knowledge of the classroom is then fused with museum learning, building stronger memories and facilitating deeper understanding as students learn about museum objects. This research explored the correlation of these two theories in a qualitative manner based on observations of actual museum visit preparation in classrooms in Casper, Wyoming, and how it related to a museum tour at the Nicolaysen Art Museum and Discovery Center. The research revealed that conditions do exist within the community that would facilitate Bruner's (1963) idea of a learning spiral, yet not in the manner envisioned. The observed conditions toward a spiral was accomplished through the participant teachers relating the museum exhibit to their operational curriculum in a variety of curricular areas, such as language arts and science, when docents related the tour to classroom learning, and not through museum resources or Yenawine's (1992) methods toward increasing visual literacy, as was previously considered. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5285/
Experiencing the view.
This article discusses the way people experience the landscape. Tracing the progress of landscape photography from the late nineteenth century to the present, the author introduces the way concepts in landscape photography have changed. The author's photographs are discussed regarding how they build on the foundation of this historical precedent. Using photographs of individuals at places they think are special, the author examines their perception of landscape. The positions and actions of the subjects shape the way their attitudes are conveyed. The concept of beauty is discussed as it relates to the appreciation of landscape. By discussing with the subjects why these places are special and photographing with the intent to convey what those reasons are, the author's photographs examine the relationship of people to the landscape. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4197/
Abstract Moments of Art Found in the Ordinary
This paper is an experiment using digital video to locate and identify the abstract in everyday life and nature. The abstract moment occurs when the image that is captured by video loses its connection with the original context, allowing the images to be viewed in an entirely new way. The abstract moment is initiated by a transformative instant, that instant in which perception is altered and the viewer sees the intended content of composition of light and sound. The project contains four digital videos that record the artist's progress and interests. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3333/
The Exploration of Surface and Texture on the Inside and Outside of My Sculpture
After generating work for many years in an intuitive, “truth to materials” mindset my intent was to explore the interior possibilities of my sculptural forms and relate these if possible, to the exterior. Alongside this exploration of the interior I introduced surface texture and color onto both interior/exterior surfaces. In some cases the work had undergone a change, which lent new meaning and provided new relationships to exist between the interior/exterior of my sculpture. Not all of the work was satisfactory to me, though I feel there were many positive results from work that may not have been successful. I found that the integration of the interior/exterior dialogue into my existing work provided new meaning allowing new relationships within the work that had not existed previously. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3339/
Imitating Nature
Through my art I seek to communicate the continuing cycle of change that unites all life forms. I had to find methods of presentation and surface that would enhance my sculptural statements that I had begun to address. Utilizing salt, wood and low temperature sagger firing, resulted in softer, more natural appearing surfaces. These surfaces complimented and completed the organic forms with which I was working. The problems encountered in presentation were rectified by alternately contrasting the surfaces of the presentation with the surfaces of the pieces, while utilizing forms that echoed the natural forms of the pieces. The opposite approach also worked well, using natural presentation materials to create a sense of unity, and geometric bases for contrast. These methods resulted in an increased sense of energy, unity and completion in the work presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3340/
Unity: When the Two Become One
Jewelry has been used as a gift exchange between lovers for many centuries. It has been conveyed in a variety of forms to symbolize the meaning of love. This body of work is associated with glory of love, of sexual experience between lovers representing the idea of unity when two parts become one unit, not only in the physical sense, but also in the psychical sense. The works were divided into three series including three pair of rings, two pair of lockets, and five pair of necklaces. The erotic expression has been addressed on every piece in an abstract way counting design motifs, material used, and interaction within the piece itself. Moreover, each piece has romantic meanings and essential aspects as a symbol of love. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3324/
Eplucher Les Oignons (Peeling the Onions)
My creative intent is to connect with viewers at an emotional level. My chosen metaphor is “Peeling the Onion.” The implication of the metaphor is that understanding is achieved after one looks below the surface and views the underlying “layers.” The challenge is to find images that are personally interesting and also connect with the viewer. At times the creative process proceeds in linear manner and at other times it seems to take on a life of its own. During my search for a balance between the literal and ambiguous, I explored the circle, the spiral and the sphere. Printmaking offers unique opportunities to produce evocative imagery. Drawing is the basic tool I employ to define form and my use of printmaking processes allows for evolving the image over time. The immediacy and spontaneity of my drawings is combined with a methodical approach to image development. Exploring the spiral, sphere, circles and the metaphor “Peeling the Onion” has provided me a means of giving a form to my concepts and hopefully a connection with the viewer. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3301/
Rasa: Serenity, Valor, Love
The focus of this thesis is the conveyance of moods through clothes, the communication of feelings through fashion. The thesis illustrates how clothes speak, and the tools used to communicate a visual message. Three moods are used as examples: Serenity, Valor and Love. The thesis presents the author's design ability, creative personality, cultural background and technical skills. Sources of data range from personal experience to books on Cultural Studies, armor and mask making, Indian/ Asian dance and theatre, fabric design, fabric manipulation and websites on related topics. The chapters discuss background information of the author and the topic of research, and present each ensemble created to support the thesis. Through design details and photographs of the nine ensembles, the thesis demonstrates different techniques of achieving visual communication through clothes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3347/
Striving for Amy: A Personal Aesthetic
The first chapter of this descriptive paper outlines a problem, proposes a solution and poses three questions for me to answer after completion of research. The problem was to bring an emerging ceramic style into all of my pieces rather than just the few I have mastered. The solution was to create three sets of new forms and make them repeatedly until they boasted the sought-after style. Chapter 2 chronicles the research of creating, morphing, detailing and finally mastering these new forms. Chapter 3 summarizes the experience and answers the three aforementioned questions: (1) What is my personal definition of a successful pot? (2) How does the undulating style affect the functionality of the pot? (3) How does the Campbell tartan glazing complement or detract from the pot's form? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3318/
Reaching for Understanding: Exploring the Potential of Four-Year-Old Children to Understand Works of Art
This study was designed to examine how four-year-old children might be able to respond and interpret works of art. Informed by Jean Piaget's and Lev Vygotsky's theories of cognitive development, and building on Micheal Parsons' and Abigail Housen's theories of aesthetic development, the study investigated whether or not four-year-olds are able to expand their initial responses to achieve deeper levels of understanding about works of art. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4176/
Painting with Clay
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The body of work created during this exploration indicates that painting approach can actively integrate with the clay element. The main point is the surface manipulation during this process. There are four factors relate to this manipulation: timing, action, style, and size. Overall, the painting approach can be modified to create a truly active relationship with clay element. The final touch by the fire and glazing techniques reflect paintings approach may be used in a variety way to decorate the clay element without any limits. Moreover, the painting approach need not be subordinate to the clay element. It can be used not only to complement the clay, but also to enhance any given clay pieces no matter what the shape is. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4360/
Loss of Innocence
Loss of Innocence uses sculpture, two-dimensional imagery, and text to explore the moment when children lose their innocence or realize their mortality. In the introduction, I explain that there are many factors, such as age and personality, which determine how children will deal with traumatic events in their lives and the duration of time that must pass before they move past the event. Often, children will combine childhood fantasy with random facts to create their own satisfactory explanation of what has happened. In my problem in lieu of thesis, I discuss work that I created with these thoughts in mind. I explore how the sculpture, two-dimensional imagery, and text work together to convey the emotion of innocence lost. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3114/
Sequence without Uniformity
The inspiration for my undergraduate body of work is derived from my fascination with Henri Matisse, Jacob Lawrence, and the Impressionists. I suddenly became captivated with the Impressionist movement and the independence of abstraction. I set into motion a series of paintings and drawings featuring random African-Americans and African society representatives in vibrant color and abstracting forms, and was specifically concerned with altering the form outside of the realistic area. While in graduate school, I began to think about how the transformation from realism to abstraction combined with the conception of mortal to the immortal. I worked through ideas to see exactly where these views began, and where they would take me as an artist. Almost immediately I experimented with random figures found specifically in the N'debele culture in South Africa. In addition, I incorporated abstraction and expressive marks within the figure and slowly introduced cut paper, flat imagery and abstraction with the realistic figure. This became very challenging but I was determined to unite these ideas successfully. More recently, my work has concentrated on the essential elements that have influenced my work as an artist, which recedes to childhood. The main elements most prevalent within the work is rhythm and space. I learned to use the musical rhythm as an instinctive reference point, as well as exploring issues of space and solid areas of flat color, thus I strived to unite all areas together to create an integrated composition. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3193/
Distant Proximity: Mapping Presence and Absence
Chapter I presents my background as an artist born and raised in Romania, and describes my artwork in connection with my interests and experiences. Maps and traditional Romanian art are important sources of influence. The questions in the statement of problem deal with the way ideas, references to various elements, and installation impact the artwork. Chapter II discusses the installation at the Dallas Visual Art Center, the creative process, and how the artwork addressed the questions in the statement of problem. Important points are: a step into three-dimensionality with the tall, freestanding pieces painted on both sides, the use of topographical contours in creating shapes, issues of form and content as expressed in the painted surfaces, and the interaction of the individual works in the installation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3126/
Discovering the Parameters of a Successful Piece: While Developing a Body of Work that Represents My Passion for Clay and My Enthusiasm for Life
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Chapter I describes the purpose of the project, which was to develop a body of work that exhibits all that I am at this point in time. The questions I presented to myself were the following: 1. A successful piece is defined by what parameters? 2. What visual qualities indicate my passion for clay and my enthusiasm for life? Chapter II lists and explains the five parameters of a successful piece, which are composition, firing, mark making, color contrast, and movement. Furthermore there is an explanation on how these parameters visually display my passion for clay and my enthusiasm for life. Chapter III is a summary concluding that by discovering my five parameters of a successful piece I now understand the elements that I am searching for in my work. My work will grow from this understanding as long as I have the same passion for clay and enthusiasm for life. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3279/
A Comparison of Texas Pre-service Teacher Education Programs in Art and the 1999 National Art Education Association's Standards for Art Teacher Preparation
Texas programs in pre-service art teacher preparation vary little. Since 1970, the National Art Education Association (NAEA) has created voluntary standards in hopes of decreasing variability among programs. In 1999, the NAEA published Standards for Art Teacher Preparation, outlining 20 content areas that art pre-service programs should provide their students. To obtain information on the implementation and the extent to which these 20 standards are being implemented, a questionnaire was sent to all programs in Texas. The 20 standards were the dependent variable for the study. The four independent variables used in this ex post facto study were: the size of the institution where the program exists; the number of full-time art faculty; the number of full-time art education faculty; and, the number of undergraduate art education students who graduated last year. The 20 standards or provisions were scored on a Lickert scale with six options: zero (not taught) to five (comprehensively taught). The response size (N = 23) was 47% of the state's 49 approved programs. The results from the survey suggest no significant difference among programs. However, the results showed a significant difference in the number of provisions taught between programs with no art educators and those with 1 to 3 art educators. One art educator seemed to increase the number of pedagogical provisions taught but did not increase the extent or enhance the degree to which each provision was taught. A comprehensively taught response to the NAEA provisions on the questionnaire was further investigated through analysis of catalog course descriptions and correspondence with participants. The results are estimated in credit hours and indicate that there may be a point where time on task decides the limit that constitutes a comprehensive preparation. Perspectives on content are discussed and regarded as too subjective to define comprehensive preparation. Comprehensive time on task varies with content, which may imply an unconscious marker of time shared by educators that defines a comprehensive preparation for each provision. Changing and local standards in art pre-service programs may have produced a range of interpretations regarding the meaning of "comprehensively taught."; digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3156/
Social Intercourse
This thesis explains the stories and concepts behind each piece that was discussed on the opening night of my MFA Exhibition. The works, entitled Film Noir, Brains, Trains, and Beer, The Boy Next Door, Peterbuilt, and 10-50, H-1, was discussed more specifically and in greater detail. Speaking in public has always been a difficult task, especially on the subject of my art. My images deal with the highly intense subject matter of violence inflicted onto others as a result of human social behaviors. These vile social behaviors are translated into colorful and humorous lithographs, etchings, and drawings. These images are displayed to the public for individual interpretation. This thesis discusses audience interpretation before the literal meaning is revealed, how much information should be revealed to the viewer, and how this information manipulates the aesthetics of the piece. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3144/
Nature By Design
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Organic forms representing nature, but not particular species, are combined with elements signifying attitudes toward the natural world with an emphasis on North American culture. The viewer is encouraged to consider human effects on the environment. Aquarium Night Light and Trophy both refer to the human tendency for commercial exploitation coupled with the creation of nature images we sometimes seem to prefer over the reality of the natural world. Reliquary metaphorically connects traditional religious connotations associated with saints' relics to both a biblical injunction to use anything we needed from the natural world and our contemporary belief that exposure to nature can have beneficial effects on human mental, spiritual, and physical health. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3278/
Poetic Products
Not many artists have made a successful connection between art and text. In this installation of four works of art, I have given a new perspective on commerce by combining my poetry with common products. The content of my work is based on experiences I have had throughout my life. I believe that I have successfully combined my poems and art into cohesive works that break through the conventional understanding of products and their packaging. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4418/
Signs and Cases
Abstract not available digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3023/
Issues of Interpersonal Bonds
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In this work, sections of bodies are joined with sections of other people's bodies in order to form a new whole. Adding or subtracting relationships can many times be uncomfortable and strange, which I depict in my invented individuals based on the phases of family, such as birth, death, marriage, divorce, and the acquisition of new forms of family. This work questions issues of the family in terms of its definition, whether biologically or culturally constructed. I am creating hybrids by separating body parts from the whole and then recombining them to form a new individual. These images are a result of thinking about the possibilities and changes that people go through as a result of the new growth or loss of relationships. This work is intended to bring awareness to the way in which people relate and families become more blended. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3080/
The Transformation of Materials and Representation of the Idea of the Baby Doll
I want to find a balance within the juxtaposition of representational imagery, patterned fabric, stain and found objects, which effectively communicates the ideas of my work, yet still provides a visually interesting object/painting. How do my materials relate to the content and/or meaning of the work? How will focusing on a single subject affect the development and visual content of my painting? How will I choose representational images to use in relation to the aims of my subject? I was struck by the connections between the baby doll and the real baby. The baby doll became a representation of an idealized body. My interest in baby doll source materials evolved through several different stages, beginning with drawings of baby dolls, then actual doll parts, and finally to imagery of babies with genetic defects. Formally, the work was able to progress as the idea or content progressed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4284/
The Creation of Modern Fashions through the Merging of Eastern and Western culture: Spring Message
I have always believed the design of clothes should not try to conceal the naked body but should act as a catalyst that reveals the existence and strength of the individual. Spring Message includes three phases, Spring Message, Mystification, and My Paradise to reflect my three life experiences. Spring Message is an attempt to express my thoughts and ideas though designs in fashion, which were derived from the ancient beliefs, traditions, and western influence I have experienced. Through my individual pieces and creations I hope the viewer will be able to see who I am, where I came from, and understand the happiness and changes in my life. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4225/
Woven Music
When I am weaving I listen to music and notice that my hands and feet fall into a rhythm. This connection reminds me of playing the piano. I took a closer look at weaving drafts; the movement of the threading setup reminded me of the notes on musical scores. This relationship inspired me to see what textures I could achieve by actually weaving the musical notes. The focus of my study is the exploration of the relationships between weaving and music utilizing elements and principles found in both, such as: color, texture, form, repetition, rhythm, and time. Both music and color produce emotional responses and will be taken into consideration within the weavings. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4208/
Industrial Landscapes: Humanity Coexisting with Nature
The focus of this project was on creating images of our industrial landscape and shows the coexistence of culture and nature. I confronted the landscape from a position that is accepting of our present landscape. While not idealizing the present industrial landscape I wanted to depict it in a way that is not devoid of beauty. I believe that no matter how the land is altered a certain grace still comes through in any landscape. In not idealizing or criticizing I wanted to show industrial areas in an accepting light and reveal the grace and beauty that is within every landscape. It is through my photographs and all the subjective decisions made when creating these images that make it possible for others to see the beauty in these industrial landscapes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4221/
Theoretical Study Using the Sense of Touch in Interior Design for Senior Living Environments
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Through my work, I explored the application of texture and materials as a means to identify specific functions. I show how texture and material selections that specifically engage the sense of touch can aid in effective environments for the elderly. By means of this study, I demonstrated how the sensory perception of the elderly is utilized in designing productive environments for the senior population in regards to the sense of touch. The interior design of senior living environments can greatly enhance the retirement experience for the elderly population. With the information I have gained through my research and work will reflect in my future design projects. I also wish to share this enlightenment with others in my field of study. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4260/
Voyeurism and Fetishism
This problem in lieu of thesis concerns voyeurism and fetishism and how they relate to art. It addresses at voyeurism from both sides of the gaze. It describes a body of work that was created to explore the relationship between the voyeur and the fetish object and the viewer and the art object. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4224/
Masking Meaning
Chapter I describes the purpose of the project, which was to develop a body of work that exhibits my current thought process. The questions presented to myself consisted of the following: 1. How effective was the expression of my ideas socially and politically after the change to the work? 2. Was the minimal approach a tool that contributes or detracts from this effectiveness? 3. Did an increase in scale successfully act as an element of confrontation? Chapter II describes the inspiration behind the making of my work it also discusses problems encountered with an understanding of the viewer concerning imagery. Chapter III summarizes the methodology behind the execution of the new body of work. It also discusses how simplification of imagery works as a solution to my problems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4241/
The Stitch as Art Object
Chapter 1 discusses how the concept of the stitch as art object evolved. The question in the statement of problems concerned the use of design principles on the stitch and the perception of the stitch by the viewer. Chapter 2 discusses the various processes involved in creating the works to answer the proposed questions, and discusses the use of literalism in the concept of the works. Chapter 3 discusses what was learned from the experience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4289/
Origami in Fashion
The focus of my work is the incorporation of three-dimensional sculptural forms into the design of my garments while still maintaining the functional purpose of the garment. Origami paper folding is the inspiration for the sculptural forms. The major endeavor was to explore and solve the relationship between the organic human forms and the geometric forms created by the origami paper folds. This presented a challenge of exact precision. During this process, I experimented with different fabrics, which can accommodate the sharp creases and retain the shape. A variety of folding patterns were also explored. Although the design should be innovative and creative, the final garment must be wearable and comfortable. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4277/
Memento
Chapter 1 describes my previous jewelry work related to my interest in body parts and other materials as medium and lockets. The questions in the statement of problem deal with how the use of a specific body site, color and incorporation of body parts in my jewelry make my work more intimate to the wearer. Chapter 2 discusses the work I focused around the questions proposed in Chapter 1. Important points are: a more focused way of using specific body sites to support my ideas, the use of different skin colors in my work, and the physical effect of my jewelry to the wearer. Chapter 3 expresses my own criticism about the work and my future goals after this project. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4203/
Pop Baroque
My objective was to make a body of work that used baroque sensibilities with my own connections to popular culture. A series of mixed media works and one installation were created that infused baroque motifs with present popular design. My interpretation of the presence of the Baroque was expanded by using vivid colors, textures, patterns and designs collected from my environment during an investigation of the theatrical fantasies of popular culture. I expected to make work that could be approached conceptually from different angles, while being seductive on the surface. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4216/
Nopalita: A Mythology of Cultural Self-Representation
The first segment introduces the background information on the use of paños as art by prisoners and how I appropriate the same materials to create and record my own cultural mythology. The Statement of Problem and Questions are about how and what cultural information is chosen in creating a visual mythology. The second segment explains the invention of the mythology by describing why certain experiences were chosen, specifically those of the graduate school experience. Also the development of self-representation through self-portraits is described. The third segment explains the symbolism used in the imagery, such as the cacti as cultural indicator and palimpsest. The fourth segment is a conclusion involving the realization that feeling caught within a hybrid culture is an important part of my identity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4586/
The Unreadable Word
This autobiographical problem in lieu of thesis explores the subject matter of the sculpture, revolving around the issues of dyslexia and literacy, and builds upon the idea of metaphor and its function in relationship to the sculpture. The four visual and conceptual elements that are emphasized are: (a) the juxtaposition and arrangement of elements and materials; (b) inability to open the books; (c) alteration of the text to make the words illegible, by creating words that are fuzzy or transparent; and (d) repetition and scale. Also discussed are ideas of post modern criticism with an emphasis on semiotics and writing of Derada in relationship to his contemporary analysis of his sculpture. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4500/
Question of Honor
My thesis, Question of Honor, addresses the premise of women's lack of choice in relation to men's honor, and vengeance; concepts that are closely connected to the oppressive world of women in Pakistan. These works deal with concepts of purity and minor transgressions that have an impact on the lives of women in relation to family names and the associative feelings of humiliation linked to men. The subtle nuances of women and their reactions to oppression give a strong emotive content to the work. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4537/
Learning from each other - Building a bridge between two unique cultural approaches to design education.
As China is opening its doors to the world and getting more involved in the global market, it is facing great challenges and competition with other countries and cultures. In order to make Chinese graphic design industry more competitive and help Chinese businesses and industries have better success in the global market, I believed Chinese college-level design educators and students should learn more from advanced American graphic design processes and marketing methods to achieve a better understanding of Western design culture and make communication more successful. At the same time, I believed American college-level graphic design educators and students should become aware of strengths and weaknesses that exist in their own design education and learn from Chinese formal tradition. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4511/
Critical cultural consciousness in the classroom through an art-centered curricular unit, "Respect and Homage."
The purpose of this study was to describe the implementation, structure, content and outcome of an art-centered unit developed for 5th grade students. This unit was designed to be an example/model of specific tools and procedures that teachers can use in the art and general classroom to promote critical cultural consciousness, which is the ability to analyze both the covert and overt elements of a culture with the purpose of developing a holistic viewpoint that values the cultural heritages of self and others. The participants selected for this study were all the students in three 5th grade classes. The art-centered unit focused on three artists-Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett and Charles White-under the theme "Respect and Homage." The research methods used in this investigation were qualitative. This study was written in a style that described the research design with its origins, organization and implementation. The implementation of the curricular unit developed for this study took place in the art and general classroom. Of particular interest in this study was the framework and structure of the art-centered unit, designed around two specific strategies utilized to promote critical cultural consciousness. One strategy in this unit was the identification of art-related or art-centered micro-cultures as an organizing framework for promoting critical, aesthetic inquiry of the selected works of art. Another important curricular strategy examined in this study was the utilization of personal and cultural value orientations for their role in developing cultural consciousness and critical aesthetic inquiry into works of art. Value orientations are common general issues or questions that we as people and as cultures apply various ranking patterns. Evidence of students' development of critical aesthetic inquiry into the focused works of art was documented and discussed, along with evidence of students' expanded understanding of art and culture. That evidence, added to students' personal, reflective ideas exhibited in the context of their personal art making, provided the record of students' growth in critical cultural consciousness used in this study. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4597/
"Documenting" East Texas: Spirit of Place in the Photography of Keith Carter
This thesis examines similarities in photographs made by the contemporary photographer Keith Carter and photographers active with the Farm Security Administration during the 1930s. Stylistically and in function, works by Carter and these photographers comment on social and cultural values of a region. This thesis demonstrates that many of Carter's black and white photographs continue, contribute to, and expand traditions in American documentary photography established in the 1930s. These traditions include the representation of a specific geographic place that evokes the spirit of a time and place, and the ability to communicate to a viewer certain social conditions and values related to such a place. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2625/
Texas Cowboy as Myth: Visual Representations from the Late Twentieth Century
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The working cowboy remains part of the contemporary culture of Texas. A visual record of him appeared early in the state's history, in daguerreotypes, followed by representations in contemporary black and white as well as color photographs, film and video. Although the way of life for the Texas cowboy has changed, it remains a thriving part of the Texas economy, society, and culture. Moreover, the image of the cowboy has permeated popular culture and fine art. This paper explores what late twentieth century popular culture and fine art images of the cowboy signify, emphasizing aspects of how they signify in relation to an existing tradition of photographic representations. Using Barthes' "Myth Today," it considers how the documentary aspect of early photographic representations of cowboys is transformed in contemporary popular culture and fine art to become mythology, for example, by the exaggeration of features of dress to connote ideals allegorically. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5599/
A Personal Expression
The problem involves developing a method that leaves conventional form and form making and moves toward a spontaneous and intuitive approach. The thesis is organized into 3 chapters. The first chapter includes an introduction, statement of the problem and methodology. The second chapter describes the work in eight movements. The third chapter answers questions posed by the problem and includes a summary and conclusion. The findings are that a spontaneous, impulsive, and intuitive approach to the medium, clay, is a productive and artistic method. The medium is responsive and telling of the method and art is produced. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4477/
Professional Widow
The focus of my graduate work was to figure my way through a variety of challenges and transitions I was going through as a graduate student and simply as a person finding my way through my education to discover who I am and who I want to become. Perhaps my themes didn't focus primarily on these events in a literal sense, but I think the transitions in my artwork have become obvious through my time spent at UNT and the variations on a theme I have dealt with. All of my work deals with love, attraction, repulsion and the consequences we deal with as human beings when we make choices according to whom we choose to have relations with. It became very important for me to deal with these issues in an effort to discover what my expectations of myself as an artist and a person are. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4499/
Polymorphous
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The first section explores how far I could stretch dichotomy in formal terms, while maintaining a visually resonant image. I wanted to manipulate a superficial surface filtered through "natural forms" as seen in scientific imagery. By this I wanted to create access to a place where forms could play and imagination could wander. I was seeking to find a confluence in seemingly opposing forces that would coexist in the same work. The second section answers questions I had established for myself. The most important discovery I made was about the true nature of what I called a dichotomy in my work. The last section discusses the conclusions drawn from mounting the Master of Fine Arts Exhibition. I found that my interests resided more in investigating an already confluent dualism, as opposed to reconciling a conflicting dichotomy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4456/
Enigmatic Realms
The use of copper in my work has opened up an entirely new conceptual and esthetic world. I have expanded my vocabulary of visual imagery based on the nature of how copper reacts with fire. The organic beauty harmonizes so gracefully with the manufactured material. This new material has certainly opened up a refreshing platform on which to further develop my ideas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4410/
Instigating a Necessary Epiphany in Visual Message-Making for Design Educators and Future Communication Designers
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Man has used graphic signs and symbols to express a variety of thoughts and feelings since before the invention of writing; they have helped him to preserve the ideologies that have enabled him to articulate his conception of the world. Every culture in every historical era has invested the objects, animals and plants around it with a multitude of different psychological meanings to communicate its essential belief systems and social aspirations. In my document, I chose to shed light on the responsibility I believe design educators must assume regarding their ability to understand and teach the importance of how similar graphic signs, symbols, ideograms and icons are perceived differently by different cultures in the hyper-connected, inter-global economy of 21st century. It is very crucial not to discount the influence and correlation of symbolic, fundamental building blocks of design with the basic psychological functions that inform our subconscious, and are also informed by our individual social and cultural upbringings. People from different cultures may cognate these shapes similarly, but they perceive and encode their meanings based on their particular social and cultural influences. One-size-fits-all communication design solutions rarely work, especially when they are distributed to culturally diverse audiences, because various ethnic audiences view the world and the visual messages that designers create for them through their own self-imposed cultural filters. These filters are informed by language, religion, politics and other shared experiences, and they go beyond what can be externally observed. As communication designers, we need to take the time to study and understand how these filters operate, so that we can accurately convey our clients' messages to the intended audiences so that they might be appropriately encoded and perceived. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4451/
Fashion Circles
Through this body of work and this paper the possibilities of using Fashion Design to express the concepts of the circle has been explored. This was done with three questions in mind: How can I use the shape of the circle as inspiration for fashion design? How can I express related words and phrases in my design? and How can I use the colors black and white to emphasize the concept of my design. To answer these questions I have created two groups of garments: one was inspired by circular objects, such as cherries and drops, and the other starting from words and phrases such as "study circle" and "circle the wagons." In the first group the emphasis was on the aesthetics of the garment while the second group was more focused on meaning. All garments are black and white. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4401/
Colorful Diary
Chapter I describes how my works are grounded in a Chinese point of view, based on sociological and anthropological approaches as defined in my work. The questions in my Statement of Problem deal with how I use "imbalance" in my works, yet still find a way to make acceptable compositions to better tell my stories. I relate how my work constitutes a positive act or event in an evolving world culture. Chapter II discusses the work I focused around the questions posed in Chapter I. Chapter III expresses my conclusion about my work and my goals for the future. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4475/
Space Vessels
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The submarine and the spaceship fit in perfectly with the ideas of permanence and protection on which my work has been focusing. It is not coincidental that I have long been fascinated with the shapes and mechanisms of these vehicles. They are complex machines designed for a complex function; I find the precision of this to be appealing. I have used their shapes and mechanisms as design aspect in my thesis work. Also, in the studio, I have developed a type of Damascus steel bowl by modifying a technique once used for making gun barrels. I have made three small vessels inspired by spaceships and submarines using this modified technique. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4461/
Key Components of a Comprehensive Visual Information System for College-Level Design Education Curriculum Analysis
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Electronic and computer technology have advanced and transformed graphic design. New technologies are forcing design educators to constantly monitor and update their programs, creating a need for a system to be adopted by college-level institutions to better investigate, evaluate and plan art and design curriculum. The author identifies metaphorical approaches to designing a two-part solution, which includes a Comprehensive Visual Information System (CVIS) and Three-Dimensional Virtual Database (3DVDb), which assign volumetric form to education components based on the form, structure and content of a discipline. Research and development of the conceptual design for the CVIS and 3DVDb are intended to aid in the development of an electronic media solution to be made accessible to students, faculty and administrators. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4449/
Beads on a String: Extended Portraits
When I was first introduced to photography, I was mainly drawn to landscape imagery. I enjoyed being a solitary spectator. Over time, inclusions of figurative elements became more and more apparent in my work. I purposefully began to incorporate a figure into my landscapes, ascribing to it a certain nostalgia and a sense of isolation I was experiencing on many levels at that time. Before long, I felt disconnected from these images because of their ambiguity and generalization. I found myself craving more content and personal commitment in my photography. At the end 2003, I started experimenting with a 4" x 5" format camera, which forced me, to some extent, to change my way of photographing and seeing. That is how the beginning of this new body of work was born. I was accustomed to shooting with a 35 mm camera, which allowed me to be spontaneous, quick and immediate. I permanently switched to a large format. I could see myself benefiting from this change. I lost some of the spontaneity that a 35 mm format offers but I gained the beauty of working with larger negatives and the endless possibilities of view camera movements. Thanks to this technical transformation, I began to develop new ideas. I tried to focus on what truly mattered to me, initially stripped from any necessary relationships among the images. I photographed pieces of time and space, filled with an emotional and psychological charge. More figurative elements kept reappearing and soon dominated my subject matter completely. My motives became utterly wrapped around human values and the differences that distinguish each of us from one another. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4693/
De-Emphasize Direct Presence
The following paper reveals some aspects of my thoughts about art. The works discussed are featured in my M.F.A. exhibition. All works are mainly based on the ideas of absence, self-reference and utilization in art practice, even though each piece approaches the subject from differing angles. My dissatisfaction with preconceived notions in the contemporary art, rooted in art history, has shifted my focus from concerns of the direct, physical presence of artworks to the indirect or indecisive elements of their context. From this position I have felt free to explore the paradox of self-reference that is involved in performance. In addition, by transferring art works to functional objects, I have found a way to infuse everyday life with my art, and vice-versa. The ambiguity of interpreting artworks with language means that I present this paper with photographic documentation of my artwork. Combined, this will give a clear indication of the thrust of my graduate studies and the current theatrical direction of my art. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4632/
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