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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Chemistry
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Survey of the Solid State Conformation of Calix[4]arenes
The characteristics of seventy-six calix[4]arene crystal structures derived from the Cambridge Crystallographic Database are presented. This survey is a discussion of the inter and intramolecular effects on the solid state cavity shape and molecular recognition ability of the compounds. In addition to this survey, four new calix[4]arene crystal structures are presented. The conformational characteristics of these four calixarenes are determined by a complicated array of inter and intramolecular interactions in the crystal packing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278942/
Interactions of Clean and Sulfur-modified Reactive Metal Surfaces with Aqueous Vapor and Liquid Environments : A Combined Ultra-high Vacuum/electrochemistry Study
The focus of this research is to explore the molecular-level interactions between reactive metal surfaces and aqueous environments by combined ultra-high vacuum/electrochemistry (UHV-EC) methodology. The objectives of this work are to understand (1) the effects of sulfate ions on the passivity of metal oxide/hydroxide surface layer, (2) the effects of sulfur-modification on the evolution of metal oxide/hydroxide surface layer, and (3) the effects of sulfur adsorbate on cation adsorption at metal surfaces. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278914/
Chemical Equilibria in Binary Solvents
Dissertation research involves development of Mobile Order Theory thermodynamic models to mathematically describe and predict the solubility, spectral properties, protonation equilibrium constants and two-phase partitioning behavior of solutes dissolved in binary solvent mixtures of analytical importance. Information gained provide a better understanding of solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions at the molecular level, which will facilitate the development of better chemical separation methods based upon both gas-liquid and high-performance liquid chromatography, and better analysis methods based upon complexiometric and spectroscopic methods. Dissertation research emphasizes chemical equilibria in systems containing alcohol cosolvents with the understanding that knowledge gained will be transferable to more environmentally friendly aqueous-organic solvent mixtures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278936/
Mobile Order Theory as Applied to Polycyclic Aromatic Heterocycles
Experimental mole fraction solubilities of benzil, thianthrene, trans-stilbene, thioxanthen-9-one, diphenyl sulfone and dibenzothiophene sulfone are determined in pure noncomplexing and complexing solvents. Predicted solubility values are calculated for benzil, thianthrene, trans-stilbene and thioxanthen-9-one using expressions derived from Mobile Order theory. Large deviations between experimental and predicted solubilities in alcohol solvents exist, therefore optimized solute - solvent association constants are determined. Previously measured thianthrene solubilities in five binary alkane + cyclohexane solvent mixtures are compared with values predicted from Mobile Order theory using the measured solubility in each of the pure solvents as input parameters. The experimental mole fraction solubility of benzil in eight binary alcohol + 1-octanol solvent mixtures are also measured and compared with predicted values. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278994/
Discontinuous Thermal Expansions and Phase Transformations in Crystals at Higher Temperatures
The purpose of this investigation is to make more detailed studies of transformations. Fourteen compounds have been examined by high temperature X-ray diffraction for this purpose. The investigations have been carried out in such a way as to reveal: 1. the existence of transformations, 2. the influence of polarizability on thermal expansion, 3. the anisotropy of expansion, and 4. the discontinuity of thermal expansion. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277668/
Thermodynamic and Structural Studies of Layered Double Hydroxides
The preparation of layered double hydroxides via titration with sodium hydroxide was thoroughly investigated for a number of M(II)/M(III) combinations. These titration curves were examined and used to calculate nominal solubility product constants and other thermodynamic quantities for the various LDH chloride systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278144/
Modeling Transition Metal Catalysts for Small Molecule Activation and Functionalization
There is a high demand for the development of processes for the conversion of ubiquitous molecules into industrially useful commodities. Transition metal catalysts are often utilized for the activation and functionalization of small organic molecules due to their diverse nature and proven utility with a myriad of chemical transformations. The functionalization of methane (CH4) and dinitrogen (N2) to methanol (CH3OH) and ammonia (NH3) respectively is of particular interest; however, both methane and dinitrogen are essentially inert due to the inherit strength of their bonds. In this dissertation a series of computational studies is performed to better understand the fundamental chemistry behind the functionalization of methane and the activation of dinitrogen in a homogeneous environment. A catalytic cycle is proposed for the oxy-functionalization of methane to methanol. The cycle consists of two key steps: (1) C-H activation across a metal-alkoxide bond (M-OR), and (2) regeneration of the M-OR species through an oxy-insertion step utilizing external oxidants. The C-H activation step has been extensively studied; however, the latter step is not as well understood with limited examples. For this work, we focus on the oxy-insertion step starting with a class of compounds known to do C-H activation (i.e., Pt(II) systems). Computational studies have been carried out in an attempt to guide experimental collaborators to promising new systems. Thus, the majority of this dissertation is an attempt to extend transition metal mediated C-O bond forming reactions to complexes known to perform C-H activation chemistry. The last chapter involves a computational study of the homogeneous cleavage of N2 utilizing iron-?-diketiminate fragments. This reaction has been studied experimentally, however, the reactive intermediates were not isolated and the mechanism of this reaction was unknown. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to elucidate the mechanism of the reductive cleavage of N2 via the sequential addition of iron- ?-diketiminate fragments to N2 to form a bis-nitride (N3-) intermediate. The role of potassium promoters on the dinitrogen and bis-nitride species is also investigated. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271814/
Kinetic Studies of Hydroxyl and Hydrogen Atom Reactions
Gas phase kinetics of the reactions involving hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom were studied using experimental and ab initio theoretical techniques. The rate constant for the H + H2S reaction has been measured from 298 to 598 K by the laser photolysis/resonance fluorescence (LP-RF) technique. The transition state theory (TST) analysis coupled with the measurements support the suggestion that the reaction shows significant curvature in the Arrhenius plot. The LP-RF technique was also used to measure the rate constant of the H + CH3Br reaction over the temperature range 400-813 K. TST and density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the dominant reaction channel is Br-abstraction. The reaction H + CF2=CF-CF=CF2 was first studied by flash photolysis/resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) method. The experiments of this work revealed distinctly non-Arrhenius behavior, which was interpreted in terms of a change in mechanism. DFT calculations suggest that the adduct is CF2H-CF•-CF=CF2. At lower temperatures a mixture of this molecule and CF2•-CFH-CF=CF2 is likely. The theoretical calculations show that H atom migrates in the fluoroethyl radicals through a bridging intermediate, and the barrier height for this process is lower in the less fluorinated ethyl radical. High level computations were also employed in studies of the rate constants of OH + chloroethylenes reactions. VTST calculations indicate that, except the reaction of OH + C2Cl4, these reactions present a complex behavior. For OH + C2Cl4, conventional TST calculation shows a simple positive temperature-dependence behavior. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3137/
Free Radical Chemistries at the Surface of Electronic Materials
The focus of the following research was to (1) understand the chemistry involved in nitriding an organosilicate glass substrate prior to tantalum deposition, as well as the effect nitrogen incorporation plays on subsequent tantalum deposition and (2) the reduction of a native oxide, the removal of surface contaminants, and the etching of a HgCdTe surface utilizing atomic hydrogen. These studies were investigated utilizing XPS, TEM and AFM. XPS data show that bombardment of an OSG substrate with NH3 and Ar ions results in the removal of carbon species and the incorporation of nitrogen into the surface. Tantalum deposition onto a nitrided OSG surface results in the initial formation of tantalum nitride with continued deposition resulting in the formation of tantalum. This process is a direct method for forming a thin TaN/Ta bilayer for use in micro- and nanoelectronic devices. Exposure to atomic hydrogen is shown to increase the surface roughness of both air exposed and etched samples. XPS results indicate that atomic hydrogen reduces tellurium oxide observed on air exposed samples via first-order kinetics. The removal of surface contaminants is an important step prior to continued device fabrication for optimum device performance. It is shown here that atomic hydrogen effectively removes adsorbed chlorine from the HgCdTe surface. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31552/
A Computational Study on 18+δ Organometallics
The B3LYP density functional has been used to calculate properties of organometallic complexes of Co(CO)3 and ReBr(CO)3, with the chelating ligand 2,3-bisphosphinomaleic anhydride, in 19- and 18-electron forms. The SBKJC-21G effective core potential and associated basis set was used for metals (Co/Re) and the 6-31G* basis set was used for all other elements. The differences of bond angles, bond distances, natural atomic charges and IR vibrational frequencies were compared with the available experimental parameters. The differences between the 19- and 18-electron systems have been analyzed. The results reveal that the 19th electron is mostly distributed over the ligand of 2,3-bisphosphinomaleic anhydride, although partially localized onto the metal fragment in 1 and 2*. Two different methods, IR-frequencies and natural atomic charges, were used to determine the value of δ. Present computed values of δ are compared with available experimental values, and predictions are made for unknown complexes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3101/
Free Radical Induced Oxidation, Reduction and Metallization of NiSi and Ni(Pt)Si Surfaces
NiSi and Ni(Pt)Si, and of the effects of dissociated ammonia on oxide reduction was carried out under controlled ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to characterize the evolution of surface composition. Vicinal surfaces on NiSi and Ni(Pt)Si were formed in UHV by a combination of Ar+ sputtering and thermal annealing. Oxidation of these surfaces in the presence of either O+O2 or pure O2 at room temperature results in the initial formation of a SiO2 layer ~ 7 Å thick. Subsequent exposure to O2 yields no further oxidation. Continued exposure to O+O2, however, results in rapid silicon consumption and, at higher exposures, the kinetically-driven oxidation of the transition metal(s), with oxides >35Ǻ thick formed on all samples, without passivation. The addition of Pt retards but does not eliminate oxide growth or Ni oxidation. At higher exposures, in Ni(Pt)Si surface the kinetically-limited oxidation of Pt results in Pt silicate formation. Substrate dopant type has almost no effect on oxidation rate. Reduction of the silicon oxide/metal silicate is carried out by reacting with dissociated NH3 at room temperature. The reduction from dissociated ammonia (NHx+H) on silicon oxide/ metal silicate layer shows selective reduction of the metal oxide/silicate layer, but does not react with SiO2 at ambient temperature. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31542/
Synthesis of Crown Ether/Ammonium Salt for Electron Transfer Study
The theoretical model of Beratan and Onuchic predicts a large attenuation of ET rates through hydrogen bonds; however, the effect of individual hydrogen bond on electron transfer reaction has not been systematically studied. The organic complexes in this study are a series of crown ether/ammonium salt, which incorporate a redox partner on each component of the complex. The dimethoxynaphthalene redox donor was attached to the crown ether and a series of ammonium salts was synthesized which bear substituted quinone and naphthoquinone acceptor. The complexes characterization and preliminary electron transfer rate measurement were completed with UV/Vis and steady-state emission spectroscopy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3141/
An analysis of the effectiveness of computer assisted instruction in general chemistry at an urban university.
The science-major General Chemistry sequence offered at the University of Houston has been investigated with respect to the effectiveness of recent incorporation of various levels of computer technology. As part of this investigation, questionnaire responses, student evaluations and grade averages and distributions from up to the last ten years have been analyzed and compared. Increased use of web-based material is both popular and effective, particularly with respect to providing extra information and supplemental questions. Instructor contact via e-mail is also well-received. Both uses of technology should be encouraged. In contrast, electronic classroom presentation is less popular. While initial use may lead to improved grades and retention, these levels decrease quickly, possibly due to a reduction in instructor spontaneity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3129/
Hydrogen terminated silicon surfaces: Development of sensors to detect metallic contaminants and stability studies under different environments
Hydrogen terminated silicon surfaces have been utilized to develop sensors for semiconductor and environmental applications. The interaction of these surfaces with different environments has also been studied in detail. The sensor assembly relevant to the semiconductor industry utilizes a silicon-based sensor to detect trace levels of metallic contaminants in hydrofluoric acid. The sensor performance with respect to two non-contaminating reference electrode systems was evaluated. In the first case, conductive diamond was used as a reference electrode. In the second case, a dual silicon electrode system was used with one of the silicon-based electrodes protected with an anion permeable membrane behaving as the quasi reference electrode. Though both systems could function well as a suitable reference system, the dual silicon electrode design showed greater compatibility for the on-line detection of metallic impurities in HF etching baths. The silicon-based sensor assembly was able to detect parts- per-trillion to parts-per-billion levels of metal ion impurities in HF. The sensor assembly developed for the environmental application makes use of a novel method for the detection of Ni2+using attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique. The nickel infrared sensor was prepared on a silicon ATR crystal uniformly coated by a 1.5 micron Nafion film embedded with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) probe molecules. The detection of Ni2+ was based on the appearance of a unique infrared absorption peak at 1572 cm-1 that corresponds to the C=N stretching mode in the nickel dimethylglyoximate, Ni(DMG)2, complex. The suitable operational pH range for the nickel infrared sensor is between 6-8. The detection limit of the nickel infrared sensor is 1 ppm in the sample solution of pH=8. ATR - FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the changes that the hydride mode underwent when subjected to different environments. The presence of trace amounts of Cu2+ in HF solutions was found to roughen the silicon surface as observed ATR-IR spectroscopy. The initial stages of oxidation in UPW and Cu2+ / UPW was studied. Trace amounts of Cu2+ were found to drastically increase the rate of oxidation, while the rate of oxidation was found to be retarded on removing dissolved oxygen that was present in UPW. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3222/
Layered Double Hydroxides: Morphology, Interlayer Anion, and the Origins of Life
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The preparation of layered double hydroxides via co-precipitation of a divalent/trivalent metal solution against a base results in 1 mm LDH particles with a disorganized metal lattice. Research was performed to address these morphological issues using techniques such as Ostwald ripening and precipitation via aluminate. Another interesting issue in layered double hydroxide materials is the uptake and orientation of anions into the interlayer. Questions about iron cyanide interlayer anions have been posed. Fourier transform infared spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction have been used to investigate these topics. It was found that factors such as orientation, anion charge, and anion structure depended on the divalent/trivalent metal ratio of the hydroxide layer and reactivity time. The cyanide self-addition reaction is an important reaction of classical prebiotic chemistry. This reaction has been shown to give rise to amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. At cyanide concentrations similar to that expected on the early earth, hydrolysis to formamide rather than self-addition occurs. One theory to alleviate this side reaction is the use of minerals or clays that are thought to concentrate and catalyze prebiotics of interest. Layered double hydroxides have been studied as a catalyst for this reaction. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3286/
Investigations of Thermochemistry and the Kinetics of H Atom Radical Reactions
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The thermochemistry of several species, and the kinetics of various H atom radical reactions relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry were investigated using ab initio theoretical techniques and the flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence technique. Using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations up to the G3 level of theory, the C-H bond strengths of several alkanes were calculated. The bond strengths were calculated using two working reactions. From the results, it is apparent that the bond strengths decrease as methyl groups are added to the central carbon. The results are in good agreement with recent experimental halogenation kinetic studies. Hydrogen bond strengths with sulfur and oxygen were studied via CCSD(T) theory, together with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. The results for the bond dissociation energies (ground state at 0 K, units: kJ mol-1) are: S-H = 349.9, S-D = 354.7, HS-H = 376.2, DS-D = 383.4, and HO-H = 492.6. These data compare well with experimental literature. The rate constants for the isotopic reactions of H + H2S, D + H2S, H + D2S, and D + D2S are studied at the QCISD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p) level of theory. The contributions of the exchange reaction versus abstraction are examined through transition state theory. The energy of NS was computed via CCSD(T) theory, together with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. The results were employed with three working reactions to find ΔfH0(NS) = 277.3 ± 2 kJ mol-1 and ΔfH298(NS) = 278.0 ± 2 kJ mol-1. This thermochemistry is consistent with, but much more precise than, earlier literature values. A kinetic study of the reaction of H + CH2CCl2 was conducted over the temperature range of 298 - 680 K. The reaction was found to be pressure dependent and results of the rate constants and their interpretation via unimolecular rate theory are presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3275/
Electrodeposition of Diamond-like Carbon Films
Electrodeposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied on different substrates using two different electrochemical methods. The first electrochemical method using a three-electrode system was studied to successfully deposit hydrogenated DLC films on Nickel, Copper and Brass substrates. The as-deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). A variety of experimental parameters were shown to affect the deposition process. The second electrochemical method was developed for the first time to deposit hydrogen free DLC films on Ni substrates through a two-electrode system. The as-deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and FTIR. According to Raman spectra, a high fraction of diamond nanocrystals were found to form in the films. Several possible mechanisms were discussed for each deposition method. An electrochemical method was proposed to deposit boron-doped diamond films for future work. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3261/
Fluorination Effect on the Conformational Properties of Alkanes
A Series of fluorophores of the general formular P(CF2)nP and P(CF2)n-1CF3 has been synthesized. Copper catalyzed coupling of 1-bromopyrene and the corresponding mono and di-iodoperfluoroalkanes were used in most cases. For the n=3 dimer, a novel 1,w-perfluoroalkylation of pyrene via bis-decarboxylation of hexafluorogultaric acid was utilized. These compounds, along with suitable hydrocarbon analogs, are being used to study the flexibility of fluorocarbon chains using emission. We have found that the excimer formation for the fluorinated pyrene monomers is highly dependent on concentration and is less efficient than for pyene. Excimer formation for the fluorinated pyrene dimers is much more efficient than for the fluorocarbon monomers and is only slightly concentraion dependent. Steady-state emission spectra indicate hydrocarbon dimers-models form excimers more efficiently than the fluorinated dimers suggesting the fluorinated chains are stiffer than the hydrocarbons. We conducted the temperature-dependent studies and quantified the conformational difference. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3103/
Reactions of N-(Substituted) Phthalimides with n-Alkylamines
The initial purpose of this study was to determine if steric problems would account for the difference in the products obtained in the reaction of the N-(substituted)phthalimide with low and high molecular weight amines. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131287/
ESR Studies of Group IV Substituted Anilines
The purpose of the investigation described herein was to investigate the degree of delocalization of the unpaired electron in ion radicals formed in the oxidation process of compounds with aromatic rings connected by means of various groups and atoms not entering the ring; then, to establish the relationship of coupling constants in radical cations with substituent σ values. The parent cation radical, in which the co-planar ion was derived from N,N-dimethylaniline, was selected in order to maximize the substituent effects on coupling constants and to obtain couplings at several positions (specifically, CH3, N, and ring protons). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131268/
Oxovanadium(IV) Complexes of Substituted N-(2-Thiophenyl)Salicylideneimine
In an effort to study the spectral, magnetic, and stereochemical properties of vanadyl complexes, both a new series of vanadyl complexes derived from type (VII) ligands with subnormal magnetic moment and from type (VIII) ligands with normal magnetic moment are synthesized and characterized. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131254/
Synthesis and Study of Certain Amino Acids Containing the Pyridine Ring
This study reported herein involves the synthesis and determination of certain biological activities of 4,5-dihydroxy-2-pyridinealanine and the synthesis of 3-pyridine-N-methylalanine. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131070/
Preparation of N-Substituted Hydroxylamines from Oxaziridines
In many series of compounds, intensity of biological activity and chemical reactivity are proportional. Generally whenever a alkyl group replaces a reactive hydrogen atom, as would be the case for an N-substituted hydroxylamine as compared to hydroxylamine, the over-all biological activity of the resulting compound is lower than that of its nonalkylated analogue. Since toxicity and physiological activity are not proportional, this comparison can only suggest possible types of derivatives to prepare and test. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130926/
Hydantoins as Anticonvulsants. V. 5-Substituted-Amino Derivatives of 5-Phenylhydantoin
This thesis describes the preparation of 5-substituted-amino derivatives of 5-phenylhydantoin. The hydantoin derivatives are to be tested for anticonvulsant activity by the Pharmacology Department of the Eli Lilly Company of Indianapolis, Indiana. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130245/
Nitrogen Derivatives of Naphthoquinone
This thesis investigates nitrogen derivatives of naphthoquinone. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130278/
Synthesis of 1-Amino-2-Hydroxycyclopentanecarboxylic Acid
This investigation involved the synthesis of 1-amino-2-hydroxycyclopentanecarboxylic acid, a potential structural analog of the natural amino acids, serine and threonine. The title compound also includes the structural features present in an established antitumor agent, cycloleucine. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131329/
The Synthesis and Reduction of Some N-Phenacylpyridines
This study explores the synthesis and reduction of some n-phenacylpyridines and is an investigation of various derivatives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130232/
Kinetic Studies and Vibrational Spectra of Disubstituted Metal Carbonyls
The oxidative elimination reactions of (5-X-phen)Mo(C0)₄ (X = H, CH₃, Cl, NO₂; phen = o-phenanthroline) and (3,4,7,8-(CH₃)₄-phen)Mo(CO)₄ with mercuric chloride in acetone have been investigated. In these reactions, a carbon monoxide group is replaced by two univalent ligands, accompanied by the corresponding increase in coordination number and formal oxidation state of the central metal atom, to give products of the type, (X-phen)Mo(CO)₃(Cl)HgCl. With the exception of (3,4,7,8-(CH₃)₄-phen), the substituted o-phenanthrolines were selected so as to minimize steric differences from one substrate to another while obtaining the widest range of pKₐ of the ligand. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164548/
The Recombination Rate Coefficient of Molecular Helium Ions in a Pulsed Afterglow at 1.86 Torr
The recombination rate coefficient for molecular helium ions has been measured in a pulsed afterglow at 1.86 Torr as a function of electron temperature and electron density without making a priori assumptions about the functional dependence. The concentrations of the molecular ions and electrons were measured and the source terms for the molecular ions were included in the rate equation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164573/
Biological Inhibitors
Four isosteric series of plant growth-regulating compounds were prepared. Using an Avena sativa coleptile assay system, derivatives in series I and IV inhibited segment elongation to a greater degree than did comparable derivatives in series II and III. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164532/
Rearrangement of Alkylhaloketene-Cyclopentadiene Adducts in Basic Solution--A New Synthesis of 2-Alkyltropones
This research is concerned with determining whether the previously reported synthesis of tropolone by the solvolysis of the dichloroketene-cyclopentadiene adduct in sodium acetate and acetic acid could be used to prepare 2-alkyltropones from the adducts of alkylhaloketenes and cyclopentadiene. The information obtained from these rearrangements could be useful in determining the mechanism of the ring expansion of halogenated ketene-cyclopentadiene adducts to tropone derivatives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164519/
Bonding Studies in Group IV Substituted n,n-dimethylanilines
The purpose of the present work is to study the effects of the trimethylsilyl and trimethylgermyl substituents on the N,N-dimethylamino ring system. Both ground and excited state interactions were studied and their magnitudes determined. The experimental data were then used in conjunction with molecular orbital calculations to differentiate among, and determine the importance of, d-p bonding, hyperconjugation or polarization of the trimethylsilyl group on the ground and excited state bonding. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164513/
Synthesis of Ether-free Organomagnesium Compounds
At the time this work was begun, there was some confusion about the technique necessary for the successful synthesis of organomagnesium compounds in hydrocarbon solvents and without solvents. It was decided to repeat the work of Bryce-Smith and Zakharkin. Thus began the study of the synthesis of organomagnesium compounds without solvents; the study of the reaction products of these organomagnesium compounds in hydrocarbons plus 2-butanone compared to the reaction products of the corresponding etheral Grignard reagent plus 2-butanone; and a preliminary study of the nature of these organomagnesium compounds in hydrocarbon solvents. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130849/
A Quenchofluorometric Study of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Molecularly Organized Media
Detection, identification and separation of polycyclic aromatic compounds in environmental samples are of extreme importance since many of these compounds are well known for their potential carcinogenic and/or mutagenic activities. Selective quenching of molecular fluorescence can be utilized effectively to analyze mixtures containing different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecularly organized assemblies are used widely in detection and separation of these compounds mainly because of less toxicity and enhanced solubilization capabilities associated with these media. Feasibility of using nitromethane and the alkylpyridinium cation as selective fluorescence quenching agents for discriminating between alternant versus nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is critically examined in several molecularly organized micellar solvent media. Fluorescence quenching is used to probe the structural features in mixed micelles containing the various combinations of anionic, cationic, nonionic and zwitterionic surfactants. Experimental results provide valuable information regarding molecular interactions between the dissimilar surfactants. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278285/
Kinetics and Mechanisms of Metal Carbonyls
Pulsed laser flash photolysis with both visible and infrared detection has been applied to the study of the displacement of weakly coordinating ligands (Lw) by strongly "trapping" nucleophiles (Ls) containing either an olefinic functionality (Ls = 1-hexene, 1-decene, 1-tetradecene) or nitrogen (Ls = acetonitrile, hydrocinnamonitrile) from the photogenerated 16 electron pentacarbonylchromium (0) intermediate. 5-Chloropent-l-ene (Cl-ol), a potentially bidentate ligand, has been shown to form (ol-Cl) pentacarbonylchromium (0), in which Cl-ol is bonded to Cr via a lone pair on the chlorine, and isomerize to (Cl-ol) pentacarbonylchromium (0), in which Cl-ol is bonded to the olefinic functionality on the submillisecond time scale. This process has been studied in both the infrared and visible region employing both fluorobenzene or n-heptane as the "inert" diluent. Parallel studies employing 1-chlorobutane and 1-hexene were also evaluated and showed great similiarity with the Cl-ol system. The data supported a largely dissociative process with a possibility of a small interchange process involving the H's on the alkyl chain. Studies were also carried out for various Cr(CO)6/arene/Ls systems (arene = various alkyl or halogenated substituted benzenes). The data indicated that for both C6H5R (R=various alkyl chains) or multi-alkyl substituted arenes (i.e. o-xylene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene) containing an "unhindered" ring-edge, bonding to the the Cr(CO)5 moiety occurs "edge on" via a partially delocalized center of unsaturation on the ring. The data indicated that both electronic and steric properties of the arenes influence the kinetics, and that an interchange pathway takes place at least, in part, through the alkyl chains on both the arenes and "trapping" nucleophiles. Moreover, halogenated arenes bond through the lone pair on the halogen for both CI- and Br- derivatives but "edge-on" for the fluorinated arenes. Finally, in the case of arene complexes without and "unhindered" ring-edge (i.e., 1,2,3,4,5-pentamethylbenzene) bonding can occur either "edge-on" or through the ring center of the arene or combination of the two. Carbonyl stretching frequencies for the arenes are also indicative of the type of bonding. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278709/
A Chemical Analysis of Soft Wheat
The purpose of this piece of research is to determine the chemical composition of soft winter wheat, and to make a comparative study of it. A study is also made concerning its possibilities as a balanced food. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70273/
Chemical Analysis of the Bottom Deposits of Artificial Lakes with Special Emphasis on Lake Dallas
This study is for the purpose of determining the chemical content of typical artificial reservoir bottom deposits. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70267/
Fabrication and light scattering study of multi-responsive nanostructured hydrogels and water-soluble polymers.
Monodispersed microgels composed of poly-acrylic acid (PAAc) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) interpenetrating networks were synthesized by 2-step method with first preparing PNIPAM microgel and then polymerizing acrylic acid that interpenetrates into the PNIPAM network. The semi-dilute aqueous solutions of the PNIPAM-PAAc IPN microgels exhibit an inverse thermo-reversible gelation. Furthermore, IPN microgels undergo the reversible volume phase transitions in response to both pH and temperature changes associated to PAAc and PNIPAM, respectively. Three applications based on this novel hydrogel system are presented: a rich phase diagram that opens a door for fundamental study of phase behavior of colloidal systems, a thermally induced viscosity change, and in situ hydrogel formation for controlled drug release. Clay-polymer hydrogel composites have been synthesized based on PNIPAM gels containing 0.25 to 4 wt% of the expandable smectic clay Na-montmorillonite layered silicates (Na-MLS). For Na-MLS concentrations ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 wt%, the composite gels have larger swelling ratio and stronger mechanical strength than those for a pure PNIPAM. The presence of Na-MLS does not affect the value of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the PNIPAM. Surfactant-free hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) microgels have been synthesized in salt solution. In a narrow sodium chloride concentration range from 1.3 to 1.4 M, HPC chains can self-associate into colloidal particles at room temperature. The microgel particles were then obtained in situ by bonding self-associated HPC chains at 23 0C using divinyl sulfone as a cross-linker. The volume phase transition of the resultant HPC microgels has been studied as a function of temperature at various salt concentrations. A theoretical model based on Flory-Huggins free energy consideration has been used to explain the experimental results. Self-association behavior and conformation variation of long chain branched (LCB) poly (2-ethyloxazoline) (PEOx) with a CH3-(CH2)17 (C18) modified surface are investigated using light scattering techniques in various solvents. The polymer critical aggregation concentration (cac) strongly depends on solvent polarity, decreasing as the solvent becomes more hydrophobic. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4374/
A Chemical Analysis of the Soils of Denton County, Texas
The purpose of this study was to analyze the different soils in Denton, Texas. For the purpose of this study, the soils of Denton County are divided into three general groups with respect to origin: 1)those formed in place by the weathering of consolidated rocks, 2) those formed from the weathering of unconsolidated rocks, and 3) alluvial soils. A chemical analysis of representative samples of Bell Clay, Kirvin fine sandy loam, and San Saba clay has been made, and shown to have a strict correlation with their respective geological origins. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29839/
Mercury-Sensitized Photochemical Action on a Mixture of Isobutane and Isobutene
This study investigated mercury-sensitized photochemical action on a mixture of isobutane and isobutene. Flow runs of isobutane-isobutene 3.2.1 mercury-saturated gases illuminated with unfiltered radiation of mercury vapor lamp gave no detectable change to hydrocarbons heavier than C4 at reaction tempratures of 27C. and 99C. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29933/
Kinetic Investigation of the Gas Phase Atomic Sulfur and Nitrogen Dioxide Reaction
The kinetics of the reaction of atomic sulfur and nitrogen dioxide have been investigated over the temperature range 298 to 650 K and pressures from 14 - 405 mbar using the laser flash photolysis - resonance fluorescence technique. The overall bimolecular rate expression k (T) = (1.88 ± 0.49) x10-11 exp-(4.14 ± 0.10 kJ mol-1)/RT cm3 molecule-1 s-1 is derived. Ab initio calculations were performed at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory and a potential energy surface has been derived. RRKM theory calculations were performed on the system. It is found that an initially formed SNO2 is vibrationally excited and the rate of collisional stabilization is slower than the rate of dissociation to SO + NO products by a factor of 100 - 1000, under the experimental conditions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc68055/
Effects of Using Logic and Spatial Cybergames to Improve Student Success Rates in Lower-Division Chemistry Courses
A study was conducted to investigate the relationships between cybergaming treatment groups and the control group (N = 99: ncontrol = 8; nlogic = 29; nspatial = 30; ncombination = 32) with success in the organic chemistry I course as measured by achievement over a 10-week period. The treatment groups included logic training, spatial training, and combination logic-spatial training. Students' ability was measured by pre/post exams using the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) to measure logic ability, Purdue Visualizations of Rotations (ROT) test to measure spatial skills, and the General-Organic-Biochemistry (GOB) Exam to measure content attainment. Finally, students' responses about participation in this experience were evaluated using open- and closed-ended questions on a self-developed survey. A second study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between the cybergaming treatment and control groups (N = 88: nexperimental = 27; ncontrol = 61) with success in the general chemistry I course as measured by achievement and final course averages and grades. The cybergaming treatment group underwent intensive combination logic-spatial training for 10 weeks. Students' progress was measured using three pre/post instruments: Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) measured logic ability, Purdue Visualizations of Rotations (ROT) Test measured spatial skills, and the California Chemistry Diagnostic Exam measured content attainment. Finally, students' responses about their participation in this experience were evaluated using open- and closed-ended questions on a self-developed survey. Analyses of the data were performed to determine the relationships between cybergaming treatments and control groups in organic chemistry I and general chemistry I courses. In organic chemistry I results showed no statistical or practical significance as to students' success. In general chemistry I results indicated statistical significance and medium practicality for students with an average grade of C and for females over males as to improvement of spatial skills. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc68010/
Electrodeposit of Nickel
The purpose of this study is to investigate the varying conditions in types of solutions, concentrations of solutions, hydrogen-ion concentration, current densities and potentials in the electro deposition of nickel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29871/
A Comparative Investigation of the Water of Lake Bridgeport with Reference to Plant and Animal Life
The investigation of the waters of Lake Bridgeport is to obtain data essential for a satisfactory understanding of the physical and chemical factors on the aquatic life. These factors detremine the kinds of food available for life there. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29876/
The Rate of Natural Fermentation of Various Solutions with Regard to Temperature
The purpose of this study is to investigate the rate of natural fermentation of solutions at different temperatures. Whatever microorganisms that chanced to be present in the air and that chanced to fall into the inoculating medium are the ones which brought about fermentation when transferred to the fermentable solution. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29919/
Determination of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium in Various Plants
This study attempted to form some conception, through the analysis of a representative group of plants in the vicinity of Denton, of the amount of the three essential elements in the leaves as compared with the amount in the woody portions. The comparison of leaf with stem as to the quantity of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium is explained. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29915/
An Analysis of the Naphtha Cut of Cooke county, Texas, Crude Oil
This study attempted to determine hydrocarbons in the crude oil by comparing the results obtained using the two methods of analysis: chemical analysis and Kurtz-Headington analysis. The Kurtz-Headington analysis was found to be adequate to determine hydrocarbons in the crude oil. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29917/
The Chemical Analysis of the Mebane Cottonseed Kernel
The purpose of this work is to make a fairly complete chemical analysis of the Mebane 804-50 cottonseed kernel. A brief history of cotton plant and the economic value of its products are also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70290/
A Chemical Analysis of the Blackeyed Pea
The purpose of this research problem is to determine the chemical composition of the blackeyed pea and to make a comparative study of the results. The value of the blackeyed pea as food, its chemical nature, and possible industrial uses are studied and recorded. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70288/
Study of Interactions Between Diffusion Barrier Layers and Low-k Dielectric Materials for Copper/Low-k Integration
The shift to the Cu/low-k interconnect scheme requires the development of diffusion barrier/adhesion promoter materials that provide excellent performance in preventing the diffusion and intermixing of Cu into the adjacent dielectrics. The integration of Cu with low-k materials may decrease RC delays in signal propagation but pose additional problems because such materials are often porous and contain significant amounts of carbon. Therefore barrier metal diffusion into the dielectric and the formation of interfacial carbides and oxides are of significant concern. The objective of the present research is to investigate the fundamental surface interactions between diffusion barriers and various low-k dielectric materials. Two major diffusion barriers¾ tatalum (Ta) and titanium nitride (TiN) are prepared by DC magnetron sputtering and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), respectively. Surface analytical techniques, such as X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are employed. Ta sputter-deposited onto a Si-O-C low dielectric constant substrate forms a reaction layer composed of Ta oxide and TaC. The composition of the reaction layer varies with deposition rate (1 Å-min-1 vs. 2 Å-sec-1), but in both cases, the thickness of the TaC layer is found to be at least 30 Å on the basis of XPS spectra, which is corroborated with cross-sectional TEM data. Sputter-deposited Cu will not wet the TaC layer and displays facile agglomeration, even at 400 K. Deposition for longer time at 2 Å-sec-1 results in formation of a metallic Ta layer. Sputter deposited Cu wets (grows conformally) on the metallic Ta surface at 300 K, and resists significant agglomeration at up to ~ 600 K. Cu diffusion into the substrate is not observed up to 800 K in the UHV environment. Tetrakis(diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) interactions with SiO2, Cu and a variety of low-k samples in the presence (~ 10-7 Torr or co-adsorbed) and absence of NH3 result in different products. TDEAT interactions with SiO2 are dominated by Ti interactions with substrate oxygen sites, and that Ti oxide/sub-oxide bond formation can proceed with relatively low activation energy. No Ti carbide or Si carbide formation is observed. Co-adsorption of TDEAT and NH3 on SiO2 at 120K followed by annealing to higher temperature results in enhanced Ti-N bond formation, which is stable against oxidation up to 900K in UHV. Similarly, continuous exposures of TDEAT on SiO2 at 500K in the presence of NH3 exhibit a relatively enhanced Ti-N spectral component. Co-adsorption of NH3 and TDEAT on Cu (poly) surface at 120K, followed by annealing to 500K, results in complete desorption of Ti, N or C-containing species from the Cu substrate. Reaction of TDEAT with a Cu surface at 500K yields a Ti-alkyl species via a b-hydride elimination pathway. TDEAT/Cu interactions are not observably affected by overpressures of NH3 of 10-7 Torr. TDEAT interaction with a porous carbon doped oxide low-k substrate at 700K demonstrates undissociated or partly dissociated Ti-NR species trapped in the dielectrics matrix due to its high porosity. In addition, carbide formation is observed from C(1s) XPS spectra. For a hydrocarbon low-k film, the majority sites (carbon) are highly unreactive towards TDEAT even at higher temperature due to a lack of functional groups to initiate the TDEAT/low-k surface chemistry. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4384/
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