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 Department: Department of History
Famous Ships and Their Influence Upon American History : a Study of Sailing Vessels to 1861
This thesis is a study of famous ships and how they influenced American history. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75410/
China's Industry and the Impact of the War Upon It
This thesis is a study of China's industry and how it was impacted by war. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53421/
The Southern Unity Movement
This thesis describes the history of the Southern unity movement beginning in the mid nineteenth century, with a focus on the legal and political conflicts that surrounded it. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107898/
Tactical Operations of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron in the Civil War
Of the large amount of writings concerning the Civil War only a small percentage pertains to the Federal Navy's role. This is understandable since this was primarily a land war. A few of the Navy's exploits such as the capture of New Orleans, the sinking of the Alabama, the capture of the Florida in Brazilian waters, and the Trent affair received great amounts of publicity, but the majority of the naval activities were of a routine nature, each individually warranting little notice but collectively contributing immensely to the final Federal victory. The purpose of this paper is to show in detail the role of only a portion of the Navy, the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, during this struggle. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108082/
Racial Segregation during Reconstruction : the Evolution of Laws and Practices in the Southern States
This thesis discusses racial segregation during the reconstruction period. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108012/
The Influence of William Jennings Bryan on the Democratic Party
This thesis looks at the life and political influence of William Jennings Bryan, and his work as a champion of the rights of the common man. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83337/
The Prostitution of Self-Determination by Hitler in Austria
The right of national independence, which came to be called the principle of self-determination, is, in general terms, the belief that each nation has a right to constitute an independent state and determine its own government. It will be the thesis of this paper to show that the Nazi regime under the rule of Adolph Hitler took this principle as its own insofar as its relations with other nations were concerned, but while they paid lip service to the principle, it was in fact being prostituted to the fullest degree in the case of Austria and the Anschluss of 1938. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130410/
Pursuit of Happiness: Struggling to Preserve Status Quo in Revolutionary Era Nova Scotia
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Following the Glorious Revolution in 1688, the British North American colonies interpreted Parliament's success in removing arbitrary governmental practices and establishing a balanced government as a victory for local representative government. Within these colonies, merchants secured their influence in local government in order to protect their profits and trade networks. The New England merchants that resettled in Nova Scotia in the 1750s successfully established a local government founded upon their rights as British subjects. The attempt by the British government to centralize the imperial administration in 1763 and the perceived threat of reintroducing arbitrary rule by Parliament was a direct threat to the colonial governmental system. Although Nova Scotia chose loyalism in 1775-1776, this decision did not stem from isolation or a differing political philosophy. In fact, it was their cultural and political similarities that led Nova Scotia and New England to separate paths in 1776. Nova Scotia merchants controlling the Assembly were able to confront and defeat attempts that threatened their influence in local politics and on the local economy. With the threat to their authority defeated and new markets opening for the colony, the Nova Scotia merchant class was able to preserve the status quo in local government. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5318/
The Legacy of Purgatory: The Continuing English Eschatological Controversy
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This work examines particular attributes of the purgatorial phenomena from pre-Christian history of the Indo-European world to the Early Modern Period of England. An attempt has been made to identify and concentrate attention upon examples which provide the most significant and penetrating look into this evolution. For example, a portion of this paper attempts to determine just how widespread purgatorial customs were throughout England and the various types of community that supported these beliefs pre and post Reformation. By comparing life before and after the reigns of Henry and Edward a conclusion is reached that reveals the Protestant Reformation in England stripped the laity of a fundamental instrument they needed to support their religiosity and custom. This becomes evident in further years as some of those same customs and rituals that had been considered anathema by Protestants, slowly crept back into the liturgy of the new religion. Strong evidence of this is provided, with a strong emphasis placed upon late seventeenth and early eighteenth century death eulogies, with a section of this paper being devoted to the phenomena of the Sin-Eater. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5315/
Effects of partner violence and psychological abuse on women's mental health over time.
This study examined the distinct effects of partner violence and psychological abuse on women's mental health over time. Latent growth modeling was used to examine stability and change over time, evaluating the course and consequences of each form of abuse. The size of women's social support network was examined as a mediator. The sample consisted of 835 African American, Euro-American, and Mexican American low-income women. Participants who completed Waves 1, 2, 3, and 5 were included in the study (n = 585). In general, partner violence decreased over time for all groups, while psychological abuse decreased over time for only Euro-American women. Whereas initial and prolonged exposure to psychological abuse was related to and directly impacted women's mental health, partner violence was only related to initial levels of mental health. Surprisingly, social support was only related to initial violence and distress and had no impact on the rate of change over time. These results have important implications for researchers and health care professionals. First, differences in the pattern of results were found for each ethnic group, reaffirming the notion that counselors and researchers must be sensitive to multicultural concerns in both assessment and intervention. For example, psychological abuse had a greater impact on the mental health of African American and Mexican American women than it did for Euro-American women, suggesting a shift in focus depending on the ethnicity of the client may be warranted. Second, this longitudinal study highlights the importance of future research to considerer individual differences in treating and studying victimized women. Understanding factors that contribute to individual trajectories will help counselors gain insight into the problem and in devising plans to prevent or reduce the occurrence and negative health impact of partner abuse. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5340/
Confederate Prisons
This thesis describes the difficulties of the Confederacy in dealing with prisoners during the Civil War. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130402/
Life in the Early Mining Camps of Colorado
The story of the advancing American frontier has unending interest. Perhaps one of the most colorful and unusual frontier developments was that of the mining frontier in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. During the years following the discovery of gold in 1858 and the early 1880's occurred an almost unprecedented evolution from a primitive pioneer society to complex industrial development. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130398/
Unionism in Texas: 1860-1867
This thesis studies the issue of unionism in Texas during the era of the Civil War. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130356/
The Presidential Campaign of 1896
This thesis discusses the political climate surrounding the presidential election campaign of 1896. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130338/
Politics and Militarism in Japan
This study is a treatment of the conflicts between politics and militarism in Japan from the promulgation of the Constitution in 1889 to December 7, 1941, in four major divisions: (1) organization of the government; (2) the Elder Statesmen in power, 1889-1918; (3) the party politicians in power, 1918-1932; and (4) the militarists in power, 1932-1941. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53567/
Expropriation of American Oil Interests and its Effect on United States-Mexican Relations since 1938
This thesis discusses the seizure of all foreign owned oil property by the Mexican government in 1938 and the historical events leading up to the seizure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53636/
The Anglo-Huguenot Alliance, 1562-1593
This thesis discusses the Anglo-Huguenot alliance during the period from 1562 to 1593. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130446/
Jefferson Davis and His Command Problem
Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, had numerous problems to solve during his tenure of office. Many of these problems were difficult, to say the least, and could not be easily dealt with, but among the most complicated was the complex problem of command. There can be little doubt that a command problem actually existed. Indeed, the tension between Davis and his generals was quite often open and above board. Because of this trouble, the armies of the Confederate government were never as effective as they could have been. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130418/
The Truman Administration and the Attack on the National Origins System
This study attempts to show why the national origins system became increasingly suspect, how the goals of the reformers grew from proposals for minor changes to a demand that the formula itself be abolished, and how the leadership of President Truman and the studies of the special commission helped to focus attention on the issue, unify the reformers, and shape the course of political agitation and education throughout the 1950's. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130618/
Little Rock Crisis
This thesis explores the events and repercussions surrounding the desegregation of schools in Arkansas, including an analysis of the Little Rock incident. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130622/
Alexander Kerensky and the Kornilov Affair
This thesis describes the Kornilov Affair and the people involved, especially Alexander Kerensky. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130646/
Anti-Catholicism in Contemporary America, 1920-1960
This thesis explores several events in the 1920 that indicated that anti-Catholicism flourished in an atmosphere of resurgent nationalism and nativism. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130656/
Politics in Reconstruction: a Study of the Political Aspects of Presidential Reconstruction
The purpose of this thesis is to examine Presidential Reconstruction and try to determine the part that politics played in Andrew Johnson's plan of restoration and in his war with Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130636/
The Reformation-era Church courts of England: A study of the acta of the archidiaconal and consistory court at Chester, 1540-1542
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Much work has been done over the last fifty years in the study of the English ecclesiastical courts. One court that thus far has escaped much significant scholarly attention, however, is the one located in Chester, England. The author analyzes the acta of that court in order to determine what types of cases were being heard during the years 1540-42. His analysis shows that the Chester court did not deviate significantly from the general legal and theological structure and function of Tudor church courts of the period. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2461/
The Relations Between the United States and Honduras, 1825-1933
This study attempts to assess inter-American relationships with particular emphasis on the relations between the United States and Honduras. The study provided detailed data (maps, tables, and figures) that depicted distrubution of trade between the two countries and investments of United States in Hundrashe from 1825 to 1933. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29855/
In justice to our Indian allies: The government of Texas and her Indian allies, 1836-1867.
Traditional histories of the Texas frontier overlook a crucial component: efforts to defend Texas against Indians would have been far less successful without the contributions of Indian allies. The government of Texas tended to use smaller, nomadic bands such as the Lipan Apaches and Tonkawas as military allies. Immigrant Indian tribes such as the Shawnee and Delaware were employed primarily as scouts and interpreters. Texas, as a result of the terms of her annexation, retained a more control over Indian policy than other states. Texas also had a larger unsettled frontier region than other states. This necessitated the use of Indian allies in fighting and negotiating with hostile Indians, as well as scouting for Ranger and Army expeditions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9010/
The Development of the Sulphur Industry in Texas.
This thesis aimed to study the historical phase of the sulphur industry in Texas and highlights the critical role of Sulphur in the future economic development of Texas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29848/
The Effect of Facism on Italian Education
This study attempts to assess the early education system of Italy (from 1870 to 1918) and shows what effect the early features had upon the lives of the Italian children. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29925/
Greek texts and English translations of the Bible: a comparison and contrast of the Textus Receptus Greek New Testament of the sixteenth century and the Alexandrian text of Westcott and Hort (nineteenth century) and Aland and Metzger (twentieth century) concerning variant texts that pertain to the orthodox Christology of the Council of Nicea, A.D. 325.
The argument of this paper is that certain salient passages in the New Testament concerning Christology, as it was defined in the Nicene creed in A.D. 325, reflect such orthodoxy better in the Textus Receptus Greek texts and the English translations made from them than do the Alexandrian texts. Arian theology, which was condemned as heretical at Nicea, is examined. Patristic quotations, historical texts, and arguments of the scholars are cited and traced, along with a comparison of Christological verses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3315/
"For Reformation and Uniformity": George Gillespie (1613-1648) and the Scottish Covenanter Revolution
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As one of the most remarkable of the Scottish Covenanters, George Gillespie had a reputation in England and Scotland as an orthodox Puritan theologian and apologist for Scottish Presbyterianism. He was well known for his controversial works attacking the ceremonies of the Church of England, defending Presbyterianism, opposing religious toleration, and combating Erastianism. He is best remembered as one of the Scottish Commissioners to the Westminster Assembly in London, which sought to reform the English Church and establish a uniform religion for the two kingdoms. This study assesses his life, ideas, and legacy. In Gillespie's estimation revelation and reason played complementary roles in the Christian life. While the Fall had affected man's reasoning abilities, man could rely upon natural law and scholarship as long as one kept them within the limits of God's truth revealed in Scripture. Moreover, he insisted that the church structure its worship ceremonies, government, and discipline according to the pattern set forth in the Bible. In addition, he emphasized the central role of God's Word and the sacraments in the worship of God and stressed the importance of cultivating personal piety. At the heart of Gillespie's political thought lay the Melvillian theory of the two kingdoms, which led him to reject Erastianism as subordinating the church to the power of the state. Furthermore, his delineation of the limits of the authority of the civil magistrate, presented a challenge to the state's authority and led him to formulate a radical version of the Covenanter doctrine of resistance to the state. While Gillespie supported uniformity of religion between England and Scotland, opposed religious toleration, and rejected the Engagement with King Charles, none of these causes proved successful in his lifetime. Yet these ideas influenced generations of Resolutioners, Protestors, Cameronians, and other heirs of the Scottish Covenanter tradition. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4157/
Gritos de la Frontera: Giving Voice to Tejano Contributions in the Formation of the Republic of Texas, 1700-1850
The intent of this thesis is to convey the distinctiveness and the contributions of Tejano culture in Texas. It focuses on the traditions of governance employed by Tejanos as well as their contributions to industry, economy and defense that Texas benefited from and still enjoys today. .given by Spain and México to Tejanos in establishing their settlements affected the development of a distinct Tejano culture. Furthermore, this study will also examine Anglo-Tejano interaction and Anglo American intentions toward Texas. It will also outline how Anglo Americans made determine efforts to wrest Texas away from Spain and México. Finally, the thesis examines Tejano cultural perseverance whose indelible imprint still resonates today. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3345/
Culture and self-representation in the Este court: Ercole Strozzi's funeral Elegy of Eleonora of Aragon, a Text, Translation, and Commentary.
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This dissertation presents a previously unedited text by one of the most distinguished- yet neglected-Latin writers of the Italian Renaissance, Ercole Strozzi (1471-1508), a poet and administrator in the court of Ferrara. Under the Este Dukes, Ferrara became a major center of literary and artistic patronage. The Latin literary output of the court, however, has received insufficient scholarly scrutiny. The text is a verse funeral elegy of Eleonora of Aragon (1450-1493), the first Duchess of Ferrara. Eleonora was a remarkable woman whose talents and indefatigable efforts on behalf of her husband, her children, and her state, won her accolades both at home and abroad. She also served as a prototype for the remarkable careers of her two daughters, Isabella d'Este, and Beatrice d'Este, who are celebrated for their erudition and patronage of arts and letters. The text is a mirror of the Estense court and reveals to us how its members no doubt saw themselves, at the very peak of its temporal power and the height of its prestige as a center of cultural creativity. It is also important for the striking portrait it presents of Eleonora. Ercole Strozzi chose to call his poem an epicedium, an ancient minor literary genre that had received attention in the two decades prior to its composition, due to the discovery and printing of the silver age Roman poet Statius, whose text includes several epicedia. Strozzi deftly adapts and transcends both his ancient and contemporary models (especially Poliziano), and in the process, creates a new Latin literary genre, the Renaissance epicedium. It is a fine poem, full of both erudition and creativity, and as such is the first fruits of what would be Ercole Strozzi's illustrious poetic career. The work is genuinely worthy of study on both esthetic and historical grounds. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc33223/
White Creole Women in the British West Indies: From Stereotype to Caricature
Many researchers of gender studies and colonial history ignore the lives of European women in the British West Indies. The scarcity of written information combined with preconceived notions about the character of the women inhabiting the islands make this the "final frontier" in colonial studies on women. Over the long eighteenth century, travel literature by men reduced creole white women to a stereotype that endured in literature and visual representations. The writings of female authors, who also visited the plantation islands, display their opinions on the creole white women through their letters, diaries and journals. Male authors were preoccupied with the sexual morality of the women, whereas the female authors focus on the temperate lifestyles of the local females. The popular perceptions of the creole white women seen in periodicals, literature, and caricatures in Britain seem to follow this trend, taking for their sources the travel histories. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc33190/
Minor Political Parties Since 1872 and Their Influence
This study discusses the poltical parties in the United States. The writer concluded that the question whether the US will ever have a multiple party system as is maintained in European countries, can be answered only by time. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29896/
Texas Annexation and the Presidential Election of 1844 in the Richmond, Virginia, and New Orleans, Louisiana, Newspaper
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This thesis examines the issue of Texas annexation from the viewpoints of two southern cities: Richmond, Virginia, and New Orleans, Louisiana. It looks primarily at four major newspapers, two in each city: the Richmond Enquirer and the Richmond Whig; and the New Orleans Times-Picayune and the New Orleans Whig. These four newspapers were examined thoroughly from January 1844 to July 1845. In addition to the above newspapers, the Congressional Globe and national voting patterns on Texas annexation were examined. Analysis of the editorial articles in the above newspapers offers the best possibility of understanding public sentiment toward Texas annexation and the presidential election of 1844. The evidence examined in this study indicates that Texas annexation became a decisive issue in the presidential election of 1844. It also shows that, although the press and elements within both Democratic and Whig parties were aware that the slavery question was intricately linked to the Texas annexation issue, slavery and sectional politics were not the primary factors influencing annexation. Ultimately, fundamental concerns regarding western expansion in general, especially for the Whigs, and political party loyalty proved the decisive factors in the presidential election of 1844 and Texas annexation. The evidence gathered in this study indicates that Texas annexation deliberately became an issue in the presidential election by the Democratic party. It also shows that although consideration was given to the slavery question by elements of both the Whig and Democratic parties, sectional politics did not enter into play concerning the annexation of Texas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2998/
History of Railway Development in China
This study attempts to provide detailed analysis of materials gathered from various sources and to an orderly presentation of facts and figures regarding railway construction in China. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29932/
Children, Adolescents, and English Witchcraft
One area of history that historians have ignored is that of children and their relationship to witchcraft and the witch trials. This thesis begins with a survey of historical done on the general theme of childhood, and moves on to review secondary literature about children and the continental witch trials. The thesis also reviews demonological theory relating to children and the roles children played in the minds of continental and English demonologists. Children played various roles: murder victims, victims of dedication to Satan, child-witches, witnesses for the prosecution, victims of bewitchment or possession, and victims of seduction into witchcraft. The final section of the thesis deals with children and English witchcraft. In England children tended to play the same roles as described by the demonologists. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4952/
The Public Polemics of Baldur von Schirach: A Study of National Socialist Rhetoric and Aesthetics, 1922-1945
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This dissertation examines the political writings and speeches of Baldur von Schirach, a leading figure of the National Socialist German Worker's Party, and the means by which he chose to transmit his beliefs in totalitarianism, racism, and militarism. Schirach's activities serve as a case study of the Third Reich's artistic and cultural programs and the means by which these programs served as conduits for propaganda and public education. Throughout his career as the leader of the National Socialist Student's League, Reich Youth Leader, and Gauleiter of Vienna, Schirach promulgated a political theory which interpreted the rise of the Third Reich as an expression of an innately superior German culture. He put this theory forth through the use of artistic means, including his own poetry and prose, and theoretical exegeses of artistic and literary works that explained them within a fascist, totalitarian idiom. The dissertation discusses Schirach's personal adherence to Nazism and its roots; the ways in which he interpreted fascist philosophical tenets, symbols, messages, and archetypes; his concepts of youth and adult education; his attempts to mold the artistic community of Vienna into an aesthetically progressive, yet politically coherent, means of propaganda; and his role in the destruction of the Jews of Vienna and his explanation of this act as a cultural contribution to the Third Reich. The dissertation is based upon Schirach's own speeches, poems, and published writings dealing with education and politics, as well as unpublished archival sources housed in the Österreichisches Staatsarchiv in Vienna and the National Archives in Washington, DC. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4363/
Lucca in the Signoria of Paolo Guinigi, 1400-1430
This study analyzes the once great medieval Tuscan capital of Lucca's struggle for survival at the beginning of the fifteenth century. This was the age of the rise of regional states in Italy, and the expansionistic aims of Milan, Florence and others were a constant challenge to city-states such as Lucca which desired a political and cultural status quo. Yet, it was a challenge that was successfully met; unlike Pisa, Siena, Perugia, and various other major Tuscan cities, Lucca did not succumb to Milanese or Florentine aggression in the early Quattrocento. Why it did not is a major topic of discussion here. One of the means in which the Lucchese faced the new political and military realities of the time was the establishment of a monarchial system of government in the signoria of Paolo Guinigi (r. 1400-1430). The Guinigi Signoria was not characterized by the use of intimidation and violence, but rather by clientage, kinship and neighborhood bonds, marriage alliances, and the general consent of the people. Paolo garnered the consent of the people at first because his wealth allowed him to protect Lucca and its contado to a greater extent than would have been possible otherwise, and because of his family's long ties with the powerful Visconti of Milan; he held it later because he provided the city-state with capable leadership. This study extends the evidence of recent scholars that every Italian Renaissance city was unique based on its particular geography, alliances, civic wealth, and a number of other factors. Lucca in the period of Paolo Guinigi, a monarchy in the setting of one of the traditionally most republican cities of Italy, provides a most interesting example. “Civic humanism,” for example, has a decidedly different slant in Lucca than elsewhere, and is best exemplified in the figure of Giovanni Sercambi. This study also provides new perspectives from which to view Florence and Milan during the period of “crisis” at the beginning of the fifteenth century, and thus contributes to the mass of scholarship concerning the Baron thesis. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3134/
A Survey of the Educational, Vocational, and Social Rehabilitation Efforts for the Blind in the United States
Defines blindness and discusses the advances made in recent history to help blind people participate more actively in society. Specific emphasis on education and vocational rehabilitation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70252/
Dem Schwerte Muss Der Pflug Folgen: Űber-Peasants and National Socialist Settlements in the Occupied Eastern Territories during World War Two
German industrialization in the nineteenth century had brought forward a variety of conflicting ideas when it came to the agrarian community. One of them was the agrarian romantic movement led by Adam Műller, who feared the loss of the traditional German peasant. Műller influenced Reichdeutsche Richard Walther Darré, who argued that large cities were the downfall of the German people and that only a healthy peasant stock would be able to ‘save' Germany. Under Darré's definition, “Geopolitik” was the defense of the land, the defense with Pflug und Schwert (plow and sword) by Wehrbauern, an ‘Űberbauer-fusion' of soldier and peasant. In order to accomplish these goals, new settlements had to be established while moving from west to east. The specific focus of this study is on the original Hegewald resettlement ideas of Richard Walther Darré and how his philosophy was taken over by Himmler and fit into his personal needs and creed after 1941. It will shed some light on the interaction of Darré and Himmler and the notorious internal fights and power struggles between the various governmental agencies involved. The Ministry for Food and Agriculture under the leadership of Darré was systematically pushed into the background and all previous, often publicly announced re-settlement policies were altered; Darré was pushed aside once the eastern living space was actually occupied. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3681/
Skylab: The Human Side of a Scientific Mission
This work attempts to focus on the human side of Skylab, America's first space station, from 1973 to 1974. The thesis begins by showing some context for Skylab, especially in light of the Cold War and the “space race” between the United States and the Soviet Union. The development of the station, as well as the astronaut selection process, are traced from the beginnings of NASA. The focus then shifts to changes in NASA from the Apollo missions to Skylab, as well as training, before highlighting the three missions to the station. The work then attempts to show the significance of Skylab by focusing on the myriad of lessons that can be learned from it and applied to future programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3659/
Gladstone and the Bank of England: A Study in Mid-Victorian Finance, 1833-1866
The topic of this thesis is the confrontations between William Gladstone and the Bank of England. These confrontations have remained a mystery to authors who noted them, but have generally been ignored by others. This thesis demonstrates that Gladstone's measures taken against the Bank were reasonable, intelligent, and important for the development of nineteenth-century British government finance. To accomplish this task, this thesis refutes the opinions of three twentieth-century authors who have claimed that many of Gladstone's measures, as well as his reading, were irrational, ridiculous, and impolitic. My primary sources include the Gladstone Diaries, with special attention to a little-used source, Volume 14, the indexes to the Diaries. The day-to-day Diaries and the indexes show how much Gladstone read about financial matters, and suggest that his actions were based to a large extent upon his reading. In addition, I have used Hansard's Parliamentary Debates and nineteenth-century periodicals and books on banking and finance to understand the political and economic debates of the time. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3696/
Famous Peace Plans of History
The purpose of the present thesis, is to trace the development of the idea of world organization to secure world peace. An endeavor is made to give a brief survey of the best known peace plans of history with a critical evaluation of the contribution of each to the ideas embodied in the League of Nations and the United Nations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53547/
The Effect of Federal Labor Legislation on Organizing Southern Labor During the New Deal Period
With the aid of the labor legislation passed during the New Deal era, it would appear that southern labor should have been as well organized proportionately as northern labor. Outwardly it would also appear that southern labor did not enjoy more success in organization because it was still docile and preferred to bargain on an individual basis, an attitude which met with the approval of the southern employer. However, the attitude of the individual southern worker does not explain what occurred in the South under the New Deal. Rather, other important factors retarded unionization: southern community attitudes, regional hostility to anything northern, southern courts, the national aspect of the New Deal and the various unions themselves. To understand the slow but continuous process of unionization in the South during the New Deal period, these factors have to be considered in their setting. Only here can the effect of the New Deal labor legislation be readily discernible. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108152/
United States and Mexico: Diplomatic Relations, 1861-1867
This thesis traces the development of diplomatic relations between the United States and Mexico during the years 1861 to 1867. The dates selected encompass the years of the Civil War and the French intervention in Mexico. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108228/
Righteousness at Any Cost: A Study in the Thought of William Thomas Manning
This thesis is intended as a detailed examination of Dr. Manning's activities and statements concerning war and peace. It will show his importance as a leader of public opinion on matters of American international responsibility; as a leader of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the same area; and as one of the very few Christian spokesmen of the past decades who anticipated and encouraged America's slowly growing understanding of her place in the family of nations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130748/
Relations Between the United States and Argentina, 1810-1940
This thesis is a survey of Argentine-United States relations from 1810 to 1940. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83407/
Rhodesia, Rebellion and the Anglo-American Response
The central theme in the following five chapters is that the native African in Rhodesia, confronted less than a century ago by modern civilization, has been deprived of his homeland and purposely restrained from progressing politically toward the leadership of his own nation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130740/
John Tyler and the Whig Legislation of the Twenty-Seventh Congress
This paper describes John Tyler's political career, specifically his involvement with the Whig legislation of the twenty-seventh Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130854/
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