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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: School of Community Service
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Multiple-Respondent Anecdotal Assessments for Behavior Disorders: An Analysis of Interrater Agreement and Correspondence With Functional Analysis Outcomes

Multiple-Respondent Anecdotal Assessments for Behavior Disorders: An Analysis of Interrater Agreement and Correspondence With Functional Analysis Outcomes

Date: August 2004
Creator: Fahrenholz, Anney Renee
Description: An analysis of interrater agreement across multiple respondents on anecdotal assessments and correspondence between functional analysis outcomes was completed. Experiment I evaluated overall agreement among multiple respondents (direct-care staff) on the hypothesized function of each residents (28 adults with mental retardation) problematic behavior using the Motivational Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Functional Analysis Screening Tool (FAST). Results of the questionnaires indicated that respondents agreed on the function of the problematic behavior for 10 of the 28 residents. Experiment II examined whether, for selected cases in which 4 out of 5 respondents agreed on the function of the problematic behavior, correspondence occurred between functional analyses and anecdotal assessments outcomes. Two of the 6 functional analyses did not evoke the problematic behavior. However, 4 functional analyses did produce corresponding outcomes suggesting that, when the functional analyses produced interpretable data, the results of the functional analyses corresponded with those of the anecdotal assessments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
New Reality Resembles Old: An Examination of the American Public's Social Construction of Reality Following September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks

New Reality Resembles Old: An Examination of the American Public's Social Construction of Reality Following September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks

Date: May 2004
Creator: Stoutmeyer, Stacie L.
Description: This thesis examines whether the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks caused a significant, lasting change in the American public's social construction of reality. A framework of everyday reality was created which focused on beliefs, behaviors, and cultural institutions in the United States. Data regarding specific beliefs and behaviors was collected from numerous survey sources, and content analysis was performed on media literature from September 11, 2001 to September 11, 2003. Findings from this study show that beliefs examined did change, while behaviors on similar topics did not. These finding represents an interesting paradox to be evaluated in future studies. Cultural institutions, as related to the public's knowledge of and relationship with each, also appeared little changed. Therefore, while some aspects displayed adjustment, this study cannot conclusively state that American public's social construction of reality experienced a "new reality" paradigm shift as proclaimed by the media immediately following the attacks.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The effects of a remote control tactile feedback system on conversation skills in children with autism.

The effects of a remote control tactile feedback system on conversation skills in children with autism.

Date: December 2003
Creator: Shively, Jane M.
Description: A few studies have examined the effects of a remote control tactile device (RCT) as an unobtrusive prompting method used to promote skills such as verbal initiations and play behaviors in children with autism. To date, however, no published studies have investigated the effects of the RCT as a consequence to increase and maintain conversation skills. This study was designed to determine whether the RCT, in conjunction with common training techniques (i.e. roleplays, visual feedback, and sibling coaching), could be used as a discrete and unobtrusive feedback system to promote conversation skills in high functioning children with autism. Results found that the RCT and training packages were effective in initially increasing rates of target responses. The effects however, did not always maintain with a return to baseline. Programming "naturally" maintaining communities of reinforcement was found to be a critical factor in the maintenance of the conversational responses.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The effects of "errorless" training and testing on the performances of typically developing children during acquisition and retention.

The effects of "errorless" training and testing on the performances of typically developing children during acquisition and retention.

Date: December 2003
Creator: Arnadottir, Iris
Description: This study examines the effects of two teaching procedures and two testing procedures (“Skip” and “Guess”) on acquisition, retention and generalization of learning. Three typically developing females between the ages of 8 and 11 learned the 24 lower case letters of the Greek alphabet. Half of the letters were taught with the “Skip” procedure and the other half with the “Guess” procedure. The “Skip” procedure produced faster and more efficient learning than the “Guess” procedure. The “Skip” procedure also resulted in better initial retention (4 weeks), but this effect disappeared in subsequent retention tests. The training conditions did not have differential effects on generalization tests across learning channels, except for the Free/Say channel.
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The Effects of Workshop Training and Coaching on the Acquisition and Generalization of Teaching Skills

The Effects of Workshop Training and Coaching on the Acquisition and Generalization of Teaching Skills

Date: December 2003
Creator: Almon, Holly C.
Description: The purpose of this study was threefold: (a) to examine the separate effects of increased accuracy on multiple-choice/rank-order written tests and coaching on the teaching performance of participants; (b) to compare generalization across tasks produced by the workshop and coaching; and (c) to assess maintenance of teaching performance. Following baseline, two adults received a lecture on discrete trial teaching procedures. A written test measured verbal performance on workshop material periodically throughout this phase. During the next phase, each adult then experienced further training via in-situ coaching. A multiple baseline design across tasks was used during the coaching phase. Results of the workshop training package revealed an inverse relationship between the strongest verbal performance and strongest teaching performance skill areas. In addition, only with the introduction of the in-situ coaching package did teacher performance improve significantly across all behaviors. Child responding remained relatively constant throughout the study, regardless of teacher performance. Some generalization of teacher behavior was observed across tasks, but was extremely variable across both workshop and coaching conditions. After the cessation of coaching, teacher performance remained stable across maintenance phases and at a 6-week follow-up.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Texas Cities and the Economic Development Sales Tax

Texas Cities and the Economic Development Sales Tax

Date: December 2003
Creator: Comer-HaGans, DeLawnia
Description: Competition to lure corporations has become an enormous issue between states. Smaller communities feel unable to participate in economic development opportunities since their budgets do not provide the necessary funding. In 1979, the Texas state legislature passed the Development Corporation Act in an attempt to aid the smaller communities' quest for economic development. The Act allowed for the creation of local development corporations; however, it did not provide a sufficient funding source to assist the corporations. Therefore two local sales options were established. This paper reports the findings of an analysis of per capita income and employment changes after the adoption of an economic development sales tax. The analysis showed no statistically significant impacts on cities adopting an economic development sales tax when compared with non-adopting cities.
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New Surveillance Technologies and the Invasion of Privacy Rights

New Surveillance Technologies and the Invasion of Privacy Rights

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Simsek, Yilmaz
Description: Definition of privacy has changed by the changes and improvements in information and surveillance technologies. These changes and improvement need new legal decisions for new kinds of privacy invasions. This study explores the scope of privacy right, particularly when a technological surveillance has occurred by law enforcement agencies. It focuses in particular on increasing law enforcements' surveillance technologies and devices that have the potential to impact citizens' information privacy. These increasing changes in surveillance technologies have important implications both for law enforcements and citizens. This study also discusses increasing law enforcement surveillance for the public's security, changes of the laws that allow law enforcements to use new surveillance powers as a war on terrorism, and the citizens concerns of information privacy. A particular attention is given to the recent public opinion surveys which show citizens' increasing privacy concerns. Finally, a set of recommendations to figure out security-privacy debate and reduce the privacy concerns of the citizens is offered.
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Plan Types and Their Effect on Retirement Patterns

Plan Types and Their Effect on Retirement Patterns

Date: August 2003
Creator: Marrone, Mickey M.
Description: In 1993, 38.9 million people were covered by a 401(k) plan, up from 7.1 million in 1983. The rapid growth of 401(k) and other defined contribution pension plans may alter retirement patterns of older workers. Previous research showed that the spread of defined benefit plans, with sharp age-related incentives first discouraging and later encouraging retirement, contributed to the early retirement trend of past decades. Defined contribution plans differ along several dimensions, especially in their smooth rate of pension wealth accrual. Data from the Health and Retirement Study show that retirement patterns have begun to change as defined contribution plans have spread. Estimates indicate that the financial incentives in defined benefit pensions lead people to retire almost two years earlier, compared to people with defined contribution plans.
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The Restructuring of the Electric Power Industry in California and in Texas: An Examination and Comparison of Deregulation as Legislated

The Restructuring of the Electric Power Industry in California and in Texas: An Examination and Comparison of Deregulation as Legislated

Date: August 2003
Creator: Lewis, Rebecca Joy
Description: California legislated the restructuring of its electric power industry in 1996. Deregulation was successful until 2000 when crisis, caused by a number of outside forces and flawed legislation, sent wholesale electric prices skyrocketing. Restructuring of the electricity sector in Texas occurred in two phases. The first phase began in 1995, when wholesale markets were opened to competition; the second phase began June 18, 1997, when the 1999 Texas Electric Choice Act, was signed into law. Deregulation has largely been successful in Texas. This analysis examines the legislation of these states and how they differed, setting the stage for one unsuccessful and one successful move to retail competition in the electricity industry.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A case study on police misconduct in the United States of America and an applicable model for the Turkish National Police.

A case study on police misconduct in the United States of America and an applicable model for the Turkish National Police.

Date: August 2002
Creator: Lofca, Izzet
Description: This study explores the underlying causes and deterrent control mechanisms of police misconduct in the United States. Outcomes of causes and control mechanisms constitute the basis for an applicable model for the Turkish National Police (TNP). Why is some police behavior deviate? What are the main determinants of police misconduct? Is police misconduct a result of sociological behavior and subcultural development within police organizations or a psychological behavior as an outcome of officers' personal traits? What are the control mechanisms for police misconduct? What are their strengths and weaknesses? Do they deter or not? Is there a control mechanism that deters better than others? What is the best deterrence model for the TNP?
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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