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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Counseling, Development and Higher Education
 Degree Level: Master's
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Attachment Styles in a Sample from a Correctional Drug Treatment Facility

Attachment Styles in a Sample from a Correctional Drug Treatment Facility

Date: December 2006
Creator: Shivpuri, Michelle Yvonne
Description: Substance abuse and dependence causes many problems in our society. Attachment style may be useful in the etiology of this problem. Using archival data, this study hypothesizes men in a court-ordered facility will be more likely to have an insecure attachment style. The participants were 73 males ages 18-49. The Adult Attachment Scale (AAS) was used to measure adult romantic attachment style. Through cluster analysis and conversion of the subscales of the AAS, four attachment styles were measured. Men were more likely to have an insecure attachment style especially a Fearful style. The study concludes with limitations of the results and a discussion about possible interventions based on attachment style.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effect of Parental Divorce on Romantic Beliefs and Relationship Characteristics

The Effect of Parental Divorce on Romantic Beliefs and Relationship Characteristics

Date: December 2006
Creator: Rowland, Audrey
Description: This study investigated a proposed model hypothesizing that parental divorce would directly effect romantic beliefs and attitudes, romantic attachment and relationship characteristics. A sample of 494 young adults between the ages of 18 and 35 indicated that parental divorce does have a negative impact on romantic beliefs, attitudes toward marriage and divorce, romantic attachments, and relationship characteristics when considered in the context of marriage. Those individuals whose parents divorced reported less positive attitudes toward marriage and more openness toward divorce. Those whose parents divorced reported less idealized romantic beliefs and less of a belief that love will find a way. Those who experienced parental divorce had a more fearful romantic attachment style and reported a lower chance of marriage to their current partner.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
English language learners: Does summer school make a difference in young children's literacy scores?

English language learners: Does summer school make a difference in young children's literacy scores?

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2006
Creator: Wickert, DeAnna S.
Description: Many school districts consider literacy and oral language as a top priority for pre-kindergarten students. In the district under study, pre-kindergarten English language learner (ELL) students are encouraged to attend a special summer school program to increase their oral language ability in English. This study compared three groups of children: ELL students attending summer school v. ELL students not attending summer school v. English speaking students not attending summer school. The students' primary reading inventory scores from the end of pre-kindergarten to the middle of kindergarten in the areas of reading, writing and oral language were compared. As expected, ELLs who attended summer school showed significant growth in oral language development from the beginning of summer school to the end of summer school. While it was hypothesized that ELL students attending summer school would show more improvement in oral language than other children over time, there was no significant difference between summer school and non-summer school children's scores by the middle of kindergarten.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Family dynamics and students' characteristics as predictors of undergraduate college student adjustment.

Family dynamics and students' characteristics as predictors of undergraduate college student adjustment.

Date: May 2006
Creator: Moore, Lindsey Kathryn
Description: The problem addressed is to ascertain how selected factors impacted the adjustment of undergraduate university students. Undergraduate university students (n=382) from the University of North Texas completed measures of basic student information, perceived level of family support and level of parental attachment, and perceived level of college student adjustment. Parental Attachment and Family Support were found to positively correlate to the level of adjustment to college. Analyses of these data reveal a statistically significant difference in student adjustment to college when comparing the participants by age, university classification, and living arrangement. Further analysis reveals that there is a statistically significant difference between gender, race, students' marital status, and parents' marital status when measuring the outcome of perceived family support. Perceived level of parental attachment differs significantly when comparing students by their race, marital status, and their parents' marital status.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The effects of bilingual education on reading test scores: Can dual-immersion support literacy for all students?

The effects of bilingual education on reading test scores: Can dual-immersion support literacy for all students?

Date: May 2005
Creator: Ridley, Natalie D.
Description: Dual-immersion is a bilingual education method offered that places English as a first language (EFL) and English language learner (ELL) students in the same classroom to learn two languages at the same time. This study examines whether second language acquisition through dual-immersion supports literacy for both ELL and EFLS children over time. Students' scores on standardized tests (ITBS, TAKS, Logramos, Stanford 9, and Aprenda) were studied to assess the impact, if any, of dual-immersion instruction vs. regular/bilingual education on reading development. Scores from 2000 through 2004 were gathered and analyzed for students enrolled in a dual-immersion class which started in kindergarten in 2000. These scores were compared to scores of students enrolled in regular and bilingual education classrooms for the same amount of time at the same school to examine whether there was an effect for students in the dual-immersion class. It was found that no significant difference existed between the groups. All groups were performing at a passing level on the standardized tests. The dual-immersion class was performing as well as the regular education class on standardized tests in both English and Spanish.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Meta-Parenting in Parents of Infants and Toddlers

Meta-Parenting in Parents of Infants and Toddlers

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Vlach, Jennifer L.
Description: Meta-parenting, defined as parents thinking about their parenting, has been identified and is a new field of research. The purposes of this study were to add to the existing knowledge of meta-parenting and to compare the influences of gender, work status, and parenting experience on meta-parenting occurring in parents of infants and toddlers. Sixty parents participated either electronically or by completing a written survey and reported engaging from "sometimes" to "usually" in four domains of meta-parenting: anticipating, assessing, reflecting, and problem-solving. Gender, work status, and parenting experience did not significantly influence participants' meta-parenting scores. Parents were found to have a higher sense of satisfaction and overall sense of competence when they engaged in higher levels of meta-parenting.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A survey study of entry transition practices used by teachers of infants and toddlers.

A survey study of entry transition practices used by teachers of infants and toddlers.

Date: December 2004
Creator: Fernandez, Mary Elizabeth Poteet
Description: This study identified transition practices used by teachers and/or primary caregivers of infants and toddlers when entering child care programs across Dallas , TX . Participants completed the Program Entry Transition Practices Survey regarding their use of transition practices in fall 2003 and perceived barriers to entry transition practices. Results show frequency tallies, percentages of use for each transition practice, and the mean number of practices used for the entire sample and with the sample split according to participants from profit and non-profit programs. Results were also organized into four subscales based on the type of practice used. Results supported the hypothesis that teachers and caregivers would report more transition practices occurring after beginning care and directed towards a group than those occurring before beginning care and directed towards an individual. In response to the broader research question regarding barriers: Teachers and caregivers from profit and non-profit centers reported similar barriers to implementing transition practices.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Differences in mother and father perceptions, interactions and responses to intervention with a special-needs adoptive child.

Differences in mother and father perceptions, interactions and responses to intervention with a special-needs adoptive child.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Meland, Angela M.
Description: Parents' perceptions of their child's behavior may differ for mothers and fathers. Differences in parental perception may also be apparent in cases of special needs adoptive families with high demands of their child for time, interventions and attention. This paper examines the differences in mother-child and father-child interactions, child behavior as reported by mothers, and fathers and changes in both after participation in an intervention program. Results suggest notable differences between mothers' and fathers' parent-child interaction scores and reports of child behavior. In addition, interaction scores and behavior reports showed some correlations. Finally, there seemed to be notable differences in the trends for the Child Behavior Checklist compared to the two attachment measures (Randolph Attachment Disorder Questionnaire and Beech Brook Attachment Disorder Checklist). Several possible explanations for mother and father differences are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Perceptions of Commitment

Perceptions of Commitment

Date: August 2004
Creator: Laughlin-Rickman, Sonya
Description: This study investigated differences in level of commitment between married and non-married individuals, effects of demographic variables by age, gender, parenting status, and ethnicity, and determines participant's awareness of and participation in the Oklahoma Marriage Initiative (OMI) were investigated. Students from a rural Oklahoma junior college completed the Perceptions of Commitment survey during spring 2004. Responses related to levels of commitment, social exchange theory, expectations, and communication were collected. T-test analysis revealed no differences in level of commitment for any of the variables investigated. Data revealed the majority of participants were unaware of OMI and had never attended a program and do not plan to in the future. Implications of this research may be useful to future investigators who are interested in the Perceptions of Commitment survey and those focusing on marriage education programs to meet the needs of targeted audiences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Preschoolers' Beliefs About Overt and Relational Aggression

Preschoolers' Beliefs About Overt and Relational Aggression

Date: August 2004
Creator: Turcotte, Amy D.
Description: This paper describes the development of the Beliefs About Overt and Relational Aggression Scale. The Beliefs About Overt and Relational Aggression Scale was designed to assess preschoolers' normative beliefs about these two types of aggression. Findings about the scale's internal reliability and test-retest reliability are presented. Findings about similarities and differences between beliefs about relational and overt aggression and gender are also discussed. Discussions about correlates of aggression, measuring aggression, and measuring beliefs are included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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