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Renewables 2010: Global Status Report

Renewables 2010: Global Status Report

Date: 2010
Creator: Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century
Description: This report describes economic trends in building the capacity of renewable energy in several countries.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Policies to Change the World: Energy Sufficiency - Eight Policies towards the Sustainable Use of Energy

Policies to Change the World: Energy Sufficiency - Eight Policies towards the Sustainable Use of Energy

Date: 2009
Creator: Rohde, Anja & Bee, Hilmar
Description: This booklet discusses how energy sufficiency is the best solution for reducing energy consumption and waste. It presents policies for reducing global energy consumption such as energy auditing, phasing out incandescent light bulbs, combined heat/cooling energy and power, carbon-negative cooking, smart metering, area road pricing, and other measures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Purchasing Power Parity and the Efficient Markets: the Recent Empirical Evidence

Purchasing Power Parity and the Efficient Markets: the Recent Empirical Evidence

Date: December 1988
Creator: Yuyuenyongwatana, Robert P. (Robert Privat)
Description: The purpose of the study is to empirically determine the relevance of PPP theory under the traditional arbitrage and the efficient markets (EPPP) frameworks during the recent floating period of the 1980s. Monthly data was collected for fifteen industrial nations from January 1980 to December 1986. The models tested included the short-run PPP, the long-run PPP, the EPPP, the EPPP with deviations from expectations, the forward rates as unbiased estimators of future spot rates, the EPPP and the forward rates, and the EPPP with forward rates and lagged values. A generalized regression method called Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SUR) was employed to test the models. The results support the efficient markets approach to PPP but fail to support the traditional PPP in both the short term and the long term. Moreover, the forward rates are poor and biased predictors of the future spot rates. The random walk hypothesis is generally supported.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries