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 Department: College of Music
The Automatic Compensating Euphonium As the Ideal Choice for Performing Music Composed Originally for Ophicleide

The Automatic Compensating Euphonium As the Ideal Choice for Performing Music Composed Originally for Ophicleide

Date: unknown
Creator: Demy, Richard R.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Music Theory in Mexico from 1776 To 1866: A Study of Four Treatises by Native Authors

Music Theory in Mexico from 1776 To 1866: A Study of Four Treatises by Native Authors

Date: August 1986
Creator: Flores, Carlos A. (Carlos Arturo)
Description: This investigation traces the history and development of music theory in Mexico from the date of the first Mexican treatise available (1776) to the early second half of the nineteenth century (1866). This period of ninety years represents an era of special importance in the development of music theory in Mexico. It was during this time that the old modal system was finally abandoned in favor of the new tonal system and that Mexican authors began to pen music treatises which could be favorably compared with the imported European treatises which were the only authoritative source of instruction for serious musicians in Mexico.
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The Voice of the Composer: Theory and Practice in the Works of Pietro Pontio

The Voice of the Composer: Theory and Practice in the Works of Pietro Pontio

Date: December 1989
Creator: Murray, Russell Eugene
Description: The life, music, and theoretical writings of Pietro Pontio (1532-1596) yield considerable insight into questions of theory and practice in the late sixteenth century. The dissertation places Pontio within his musical and cultural milieu, and assesses his role as both theorist and composer. Volume Two presents an annotated works list for Pontio's compositions, transcriptions of archival documents used in the study, and transcriptions of representative musical compositions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Voice of the Composer: Theory and Practice in the Works of Pietro Pontio

The Voice of the Composer: Theory and Practice in the Works of Pietro Pontio

Date: December 1989
Creator: Murray, Russell Eugene
Description: The life, music, and theoretical writings of Pietro Pontio (1532-1596) yield considerable insight into questions of theory and practice in the late sixteenth century. The dissertation places Pontio within his musical and cultural milieu, and assesses his role as both theorist and composer. Volume Two presents an annotated works list for Pontio's compositions, transcriptions of archival documents used in the study, and transcriptions of representative musical compositions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Vox Organalis

Vox Organalis

Date: December 1989
Creator: Baczewski, Philip
Description: Vox Organalis is a concerto for organ and orchestra. It employs an ensemble comprising the compliment of wind, percussion, and string instruments normally available within a contemporary symphony orchestra with augmented brass and woodwind sections. It is intended to be performed with a large organ such as might be found in a symphony hall or large church. The work is in two movements, and its intended performance time is twenty-five minutes. Use of the concerto format within Vox organalis results in a new approach to organizing the interaction between the solo part and the orchestral accompaniment. The organ part is notated in traditional metered notation, but the orchestral notation is organized in units of clock time (seconds). The horizontal spatial arrangement of the orchestral notation corresponds to the timing of the metered organ part. Pitch organization in Vox Oraanalis is derived from a twelve-tone row based upon the natural harmonic series. Several techniques of serial composition were used to organize and select elements of the tone row for use in the construction of the work. Use of the tone row for horizontal and vertical pitch structures provides unity to the pitch organization of the work. Vox Organalis is constructed in ...
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I, Blavatsky: A One-Act Opera

I, Blavatsky: A One-Act Opera

Date: May 1990
Creator: Cooper, Steve, 1951 Dec. 4-
Description: I, Blavatsky is a one-act opera based on the life of Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, a nineteenth-century Russian princess and co-founder of a religious organization called the Theosophical Society. The libretto, by the composer, involves a cast of three principal soloists and minor roles for six more singers who are also participants in a small chorus. The text format features free verse alternating with regular, rhymed strophes. Accompaniment is provided by a piano. Melodic structure combines some nineteenth-century Romantic idioms with twentieth-century style. Most of the melodic and harmonic material was intuitively composed to express the text. Rhythmic and stylistic contrasts are accomplished in the representation of the extensive travels of the main character. Stage directions involve a stylized set, several scenes requiring minimal set changes, magical effects to represent that facet of Blavatsky's life, and onstage costume changes for several characters. Approximate duration is one hour.
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Selected Contemporary Performance Problems as Found in Karel Husa's Sonata No. 2 for Piano

Selected Contemporary Performance Problems as Found in Karel Husa's Sonata No. 2 for Piano

Date: May 1990
Creator: Humm, Mary Mosher
Description: The purpose of this study is to identify some of the performance problems associated with contemporary piano music, using the Sonata No. 2 for Piano by Karel Husa (1921 - ) as the basis for the discussion. In so doing, this study identifies Karel Husa as an important contributor to twentieth century piano repertoire. Personal interviews and correspondence with the composer provided biographical, analytical, and stylistic insight for this study. Supplemental information on Karel Husa was obtained from journals, newspaper articles, and dissertations. The first chapter provides biographical information gleaned from the interview, with emphasis on Husa's keyboard compositions and early compositional influences. The second chapter offers a detailed formal analysis of the Sonata No. 2 from the perspective of motivlc development and cyclic unity. The final three chapters focus on twentieth century performance problems as exemplified in Karel Husa's Sonata No. 2 for Piano. In Chapter 3, the discussion of notation provides a general background on notational developments in pitch and rhythm in the twentieth century, with the Sonata illustrating these procedures. The fourth chapter concentrates specifically on Husa's individual rhythmic language. The final chapter is devoted to Husa's coloristic use of the piano, addressing his unique contributions to ...
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Stylistic and Technical Considerations for Pedaling the Debussy Preludes, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of L. van Beethoven, A. Berg, J. Brahms, F. Chopin, C. Debussy, W.A. Mozart, S. Prokofieff, A. Schoenberg, F. Schubert, and R. Schumann

Stylistic and Technical Considerations for Pedaling the Debussy Preludes, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of L. van Beethoven, A. Berg, J. Brahms, F. Chopin, C. Debussy, W.A. Mozart, S. Prokofieff, A. Schoenberg, F. Schubert, and R. Schumann

Date: May 1990
Creator: Etheridge, Kay, 1954 Apr. 18-
Description: The lecture recital was given November 6, 1989. Five Preludes by Claude Debussy were preformed following a lecture on some important considerations of approaching the pedaling complexities in his solo piano works. In addition to the lecture recital, three other solo piano recitals were performed. The first solo recital consisted of works by Franz Schubert and Robert Schumann, and was performed on November 17, 1980. On March 1, 1982, the second solo recital was presented. This performance consisted of works by J. Brahms, W.A. Mozart, S. Prokofieff, and A. Schoenberg. The third solo recital was performed on November 21, 1988 and included the works of L. van Beethoven. A. Berg, F. Chopin, and C. Debussy. The four programs were recorded on tape and filed with the written version of the lecture as part of the dissertation.
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Copland's "Single Vision" and the Piano Sonata: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, B. Bartok, L.v. Beethoven, F. Chopin, F. Liszt, W.A. Mozart, J.P. Rameau, M. Ravel, and F. Schubert

Copland's "Single Vision" and the Piano Sonata: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, B. Bartok, L.v. Beethoven, F. Chopin, F. Liszt, W.A. Mozart, J.P. Rameau, M. Ravel, and F. Schubert

Date: August 1990
Creator: Morris, Gregory W. (Gregory Wayne)
Description: Difficulties are encountered in any discussion of Copland's style, for his works cover the spectrum from harsh, dissonant works to folk music. To avoid the task of defining a style which encompasses this array of vastly different pieces, a sharp distinction is frequently made between the abstract and popular works. However, Copland has repeatedly objected to such categorization, claiming that he composed from a single vision. A careful examination of his total output proves the validity of his claim. Many common characteristics are found throughout works from all categories and time periods. These traits include a basic economy of materials, emphasis on thirds, consistent method of development, use of declamation, jazz-influenced rhythms, cyclicism, and a slow/fast/slow sequence of movements, as well as within single movements. This document uses the Piano Sonata as a model of Copland's style, for it exemplifies these characteristics more clearly than any other major piece for piano. By making numerous comparisons with other works, Copland's single vision is revealed.
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The Full Anthems and Services of John Blow and the Question of an English Stile Antico

The Full Anthems and Services of John Blow and the Question of an English Stile Antico

Date: August 1990
Creator: King, Deborah Simpkin
Description: John Blow (1649-1708) was among the first group of boys pressed into the service of King Charles II, following the decade of Puritan rule. Blow would make compositional efforts as early as 1664 and, at the age of nineteen, began to assume professional positions within the London musical establishment, ultimately becoming, along with his pupil and colleague, Henry Purcell, London's foremost musician. Restoration sacred music is generally thought of in connection with the stile nuovo which, for the first time, came to be a fully accepted practice among English musicians for the church. But the English sacred polyphonic art, little threatened by England's largely political Reformation, embodied sufficient flexibility as to allow it to absorb new ideas, thereby remaining vital well into the seventeenth century. Preserved from decisive Italian influences by the Interregnum, the English sacred polyphonic tradition awoke at the Restoration full of potential for continuing creative activity. In addition to studying Blow's polyphonic compositions, including the transcription of several not available in modern edition, this paper seeks to address the unique nature of the English polyphonic tradition which allowed it to retain its vitality throughout the seventeenth century, while other polyphonic traditions were succumbing to the ossifying influences ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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