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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: School of Merchandising and Hospitality Management
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
You are what you wear: The examination of fashion leadership and general leadership among African American and Caucasian American college students.

You are what you wear: The examination of fashion leadership and general leadership among African American and Caucasian American college students.

Date: May 2010
Creator: Angelo, Davette
Description: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, the study compared fashion personality characteristics and shopping behaviors of African-American and Caucasian-American college students. Secondly, this study examined characteristics of leadership in general, and fashion leadership specifically, on fashion personality characteristics. The fashion personality characteristics studied included fashion leadership, fashion involvement, shopping enjoyment, and fashion consciousness. The participants consisted of 268 African Americans and 239 Caucasian Americans from two universities in the United States. Ethnicity was found to be an influence on fashion personality characteristics and shopping behaviors in this study. African Americans in the sample were found to have higher levels of fashion personality characteristics and shopping behaviors than Caucasian Americans. Fashion leadership was found to be positively related to general leadership, fashion involvement, shopping enjoyment and fashion consciousness. General leadership was found to be positively related to fashion involvement, shopping enjoyment, fashion consciousness, academic classification level. However, there was no significant difference found between general leadership and age.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Hospitality Students' Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions toward Learning and Using Computer Technology

Hospitality Students' Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions toward Learning and Using Computer Technology

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 1999
Creator: Chuvessiriporn, Suttichai
Description: Following Ajzen/Fishbein's 1980 Theory of Reasoned Action, influences of hospitality students' external variables (age, gender, university classification, and work experience) on computer attitudes, and relationships between computer attitudes and intentions to learn and use computers were tested. A sample of 412 hospitality students completed two measurements: Loyd/Gressard's 1984 Computer Attitude Scale, and Behavioral Intentions to Learn and Use Computers. Males and females had positive computer attitudes. Graduates had more positive computer attitudes. No interaction effect existed between gender and classification. No relationships existed between age and work experience on computer attitudes. Computer attitudes positively correlated with intentions to learn and use computers. Results supported the Theory of Reasoned Action. External variables partially influence attitudes and attitudes influence intentions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Strategic Alliance between a Bed &  Breakfast Inn and a Restaurateur: Impact on Net Income of the Bed &  Breakfast Inn

Strategic Alliance between a Bed & Breakfast Inn and a Restaurateur: Impact on Net Income of the Bed & Breakfast Inn

Date: August 2000
Creator: Filler, Eunice Jeraldine
Description: This study was conducted to investigate the impact of restaurant facilities, belonging to a B&B and leased to a professional restaurateur, upon the revenue of the B&B. This study assessed the physical demands placed on the B&B operator by an on-premises restaurant. Lack of sufficient data precluded proving the premise that an on-premises restaurant leased to a restaurateur would increase the income of the B&B without placing undue physical demands on the B&B operator. However, many contributing factors support the importance of a B&B having an on-premises restaurant that is leased to a professional restaurateur.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Nutritional Labeling on Menus in Full-Service Restaurants: Consumer Attitudes and Intended Usage

Nutritional Labeling on Menus in Full-Service Restaurants: Consumer Attitudes and Intended Usage

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Foster, Charles R.
Description: Dining out has become an important part of the American lifestyle, greater frequencies as well as increased portion sizes have led to concern. The number of Americans that are classified as overweight or obese has also increased considerably, and the foodservice industry has become a target. Mandatory labeling of menu items has been avoided to this point, but the subject has moved to the forefront and continues to be debated. This study surveyed 502 patrons at a student-run restaurant in Texas. Respondents provided information concerning their health and dining habits as well as their attitudes toward and intended usage of nutritional information (NI) on menus in full-service restaurants. Gender, education levels, age, and household income affect the attitudes toward and intended usage of NI. Exercise frequency, the current use of nutritional information on packaged foods, and the practice of healthy eating habits are all related to the intended use of NI while dining out.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Examining the Effects of Psychographics, Demographics, and Geographics on Time-Related Shopping Behaviors

Examining the Effects of Psychographics, Demographics, and Geographics on Time-Related Shopping Behaviors

Date: December 2010
Creator: Garnett, Rebecca
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of psychographic (shopping orientation, lifestyle, social class), demographic (gender, ethnicity, age), and geographic (area of residence) variables on time-related shopping behaviors when shopping for clothing for the self. The concept of time-related shopping behaviors has not been the focus of any study of the American market. Data (N = 550) were collected via a questionnaire with an online survey company. Through analysis of chi square statistics, ANOVA, Pearson product-moment correlation, and factor analysis, it was found that psychographics and demographics affected time-related and other shopping behaviors. Geographics was found to affect shopping behavior, but not specifically the time-related shopping behaviors studied.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Taiwanese Cruisers in North America: An Empirical Analysis of Their Motivations, Involvement, and Satisfaction

Taiwanese Cruisers in North America: An Empirical Analysis of Their Motivations, Involvement, and Satisfaction

Date: August 2009
Creator: Huang, Taiyi
Description: Cruise travel has become very popular worldwide. The North American cruise market is the world's biggest. Asian countries are among the fastest-growing outbound market for cruise travel. The Taiwanese cruise market has grown substantially. However, few research studies have examined Taiwanese travelers' motivation to experience a cruise vacation, and their satisfaction with the experience. Primary data was collected from a convenience sample of Taiwanese tourists who had been on North American cruise tours. Survey respondents were first time cruisers, over 40 years old, married, and had a Bachelor's degree, or higher. Push and pull motivational factors were identified. Respondents were influenced by recommendations from media and people. Respondents were satisfied with tangibles, cleanliness, food choices and selection, and responsiveness of staff. An overwhelming majority of cruisers would re-visit and recommend this trip. Implications for researchers and practitioners are suggested.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Impact of Career Motivation and Polychronicity on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention among Hotel Industry Employees

The Impact of Career Motivation and Polychronicity on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention among Hotel Industry Employees

Date: August 2008
Creator: Jang, Jichul
Description: Employee turnover has been one of the most serious issues facing the hotel industry for many years. Both researchers and practitioners have devoted considerable time and effort to better understand and indentify ways to decrease employee turnover. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of individual differences focusing on career motivation and polychronicity on job satisfaction and its influence on employee turnover intention in the hotel industry. This study surveyed 609 non-supervisory employees working at two Dallas hotels. Respondents provided information regarding career motivations, polychronicity, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Career motivations were significantly related to employee job satisfaction which impacted employee turnover intention. This finding can be useful to hotel companies and their managers when attempting to understand employee motivation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effect of Consumer Shopping Motivations on Online Auction Behaviors: An Investigation of Searching, Bidding, Purchasing, and Selling

The Effect of Consumer Shopping Motivations on Online Auction Behaviors: An Investigation of Searching, Bidding, Purchasing, and Selling

Date: August 2006
Creator: Jeon, Sua
Description: The purposes of the study were to: 1) identify the underlying dimensions of consumer shopping motivations and attitudes toward online auction behaviors; 2) examine the relationships between shopping motivations and online auction behaviors; and 3) examine the relationships between shopping attitudes and online auction behaviors. Students (N = 341) enrolled at the University of North Texas completed self-administered questionnaires measuring shopping motivations, attitudes, online auction behaviors, and demographic characteristics. Using multiple regression analyses to test the hypothesized relationships, shopping motivations and shopping attitudes were significantly related to online auction behaviors. Understanding the relationships is beneficial for companies that seek to retain customers and increase their sales through online auction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effect of Demographics on Customer Expectations for Service Quality in the Lodging Industry

The Effect of Demographics on Customer Expectations for Service Quality in the Lodging Industry

Date: August 1995
Creator: Kniatt, Nancy L. (Nancy Louise)
Description: This study investigated demographic characteristics of 240 Chamber of Commerce members in terms of their expectations for customer service in hotels. Subjects reported their age, gender, marital status, race, educational level, income level and ethnicity, and completed a 26-item questionnaire which measured expectations for customer service. Principal components analysis was used to reduce the 26 items to five dimensions of service quality, and multivariate analysis of variance was used to evaluate the effect of the demographic variables on those dimensions. Gender of the customer was found to have a significant effect on the combined dimensions of service quality; other variables were not significant.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Generation Y Attitudes toward Mobile Advertising: Impacts of Modality and Culture

Generation Y Attitudes toward Mobile Advertising: Impacts of Modality and Culture

Date: August 2010
Creator: Koo, Wanmo
Description: Mobile phone usage has grown rapidly and is widely used as an advertising channel. Both short message service (SMS) and multimedia messaging service (MMS) are typically used for mobile advertising. The goals of this study are to examine the determinants of attitudes toward mobile advertising in an apparel context and subsequent impact on behavior intention and to investigate the effects of modality and culture on attitudes toward apparel mobile advertising. Results indicate that entertainment, informativeness, irritation, and credibility are determinants of attitudes toward apparel mobile advertising, and attitudes can explain behavioral intention at least in part. Perceived entertainment is different between SMS and MMS apparel mobile advertising, and perceived entertainment, informativeness, irritation, and credibility are different between U.S. and Korea participants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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