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Strong Choquet Topologies on the Closed Linear Subspaces of Banach Spaces

Strong Choquet Topologies on the Closed Linear Subspaces of Banach Spaces

Date: August 2011
Creator: Farmer, Matthew Ray
Description: In the study of Banach spaces, the development of some key properties require studying topologies on the collection of closed convex subsets of the space. The subcollection of closed linear subspaces is studied under the relative slice topology, as well as a class of topologies similar thereto. It is shown that the collection of closed linear subspaces under the slice topology is homeomorphic to the collection of their respective intersections with the closed unit ball, under the natural mapping. It is further shown that this collection under any topology in the aforementioned class of similar topologies is a strong Choquet space. Finally, a collection of category results are developed since strong Choquet spaces are also Baire spaces.
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Organizational Perspectives of Faculty and Administrators in a Southwest Community College District

Organizational Perspectives of Faculty and Administrators in a Southwest Community College District

Date: August 2011
Creator: Jackson, Zena McClellan
Description: This quantitative study analyzed data from ModernThink’s Best Places to Work survey to describe if employees of different ethnic groups in a community college district held similar or different perspectives on aspects of the work place. ModernThink’s survey describes the perspectives of employees from the view of the individual, the workgroup, and the organization on the competencies of organizational: leadership, communication, respect, and alignment. The study analyzed responses from 457 faculty and administrators to describe workplace perspectives across the district, at seven campuses, and by ethnic group. The results revealed that the employee workgroup was neutral in its perceptions of both the perspectives and competencies for the district; by ModernThink’s criteria the district was not a best place or a poor place to work. Based on the overall responses, four campuses rated as a best place to work; three campuses were rated as neutral. Of the perspectives, one campus rated best in all three factors and two campuses rated best on two of three factors. Rating variations between the two ethnic groups were minimal across the district and only diverged at two of the seven campuses. Although the study did not examine campus culture or climate, the findings suggest that ...
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“Civilizations without Boats”: Stories

“Civilizations without Boats”: Stories

Date: August 2011
Creator: Hubbs, Travis
Description: This collection consists of a critical preface and nine short stories. Extrapolating from the work and legacy of Michel Foucault, the preface theorizes a genre of “heterotopian fiction” as constitutive of a fundamentally ethical approach to narrative creativity, distinguishing its functional and methodological characteristics from works that privilege aesthetic, thematic, or technical artistry. The stories explore spaces of madness, alterity, incomprehensibility, and liminal experience. Collection includes the stories “Mexico,” “Civilizations without Boats,” The Widow’s Mother,” “Guys Like Us,” “Everything You’d Hoped It Would Be,” “A Concerned Friend,” “Crisis Hotline,” “Coast to Coast,” and “The Ghosts of Rich Men.”
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Novice Generalist and Content teachers’ Perceptions of Contextual Factors Affecting Personal Teaching Efficacy

Novice Generalist and Content teachers’ Perceptions of Contextual Factors Affecting Personal Teaching Efficacy

Date: August 2011
Creator: Hooten, Dorleen Billman
Description: New teachers begin the school year with optimism and enthusiasm, but their excitement quickly wanes as they encounter the realities of the everyday life of a teacher. When they do not experience the successes they predicted, many begin to doubt their capabilities, which results in a lowered sense of teaching efficacy. This descriptive study was designed to identify the contextual factors novice teachers perceive as influences on personal teaching efficacy and to examine the relationships between the factors. Two groups of novice teachers who were concurrently enrolled in a post-baccalaureate accelerated educator preparation program and working as first-year teachers were the participants in the study. Data were gathered for the study through focus group activities, twice weekly journal entries completed during the teaching year, and a culminating “lessons learned” paper written during the last month of the first year of teaching. Each of the two focus groups identified nine contextual factors they perceived to affect personal teaching efficacy. Six factors were identified by both groups: parental involvement, support from administrators and colleagues, classroom discipline, testing results, teaching strategies and outcomes, and relationships with administrators and colleagues. The groups, however, perceived the relationships between the contextual factors differently. The generalists perceived ...
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Relationship of Alpha-Theta Amplitude Crossover during Neurofeedback to Emergence of Spontaneous Imagery and Biographical Memory

Relationship of Alpha-Theta Amplitude Crossover during Neurofeedback to Emergence of Spontaneous Imagery and Biographical Memory

Date: August 2011
Creator: Johnson, Mark Lawrence
Description: I obtained 182 session graphs from 10 client records from a university-based neurotherapy clinic and from a private practitioner. These graphs were used to examine the relationship of therapeutic crossover activity (defined as at least 3 minutes in duration and at least 1μv in amplitude) with and without predetermined amplitude thresholds of beta (15-20Hz) to client reports of imagery and to treatment outcomes. Crosstab analysis revealed that significantly more reports of imagery were observed in the therapeutic crossover with beta condition and that higher amplitudes of slower brainwave activity correlated with progression to deeper states of consciousness. Multi-level modeling revealed a significant interaction between therapeutic crossover activity, higher beta frequency amplitude, and reported salient imagery. Due to small sample size, significance testing was not deemed appropriate. However, observation in change of pre-post scores suggested that individuals who experienced more therapeutic crossover with sufficient beta amplitude conditions had greater improvements on post-test measures (BAI, BDI, BHS, PSQI and MMPI) than those with no or few crossovers. Higher amplitudes of slower brainwave activity correlated with progression to deeper states of consciousness, with delta amplitude positively correlating with transpersonal states. Reports of imagery and/or biographical memory are much more likely to occur during ...
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Discretion, Delegation, and Professionalism: A Study of Outcome Measures in Upward Bound Programs

Discretion, Delegation, and Professionalism: A Study of Outcome Measures in Upward Bound Programs

Date: August 2011
Creator: Holt, Amy C.
Description: In our society, American citizens expect public policies to result in programs that address social problems in ways that are both efficient and effective. In order to judge if these two values are being achieved, public programs are often scrutinized through program monitoring and evaluation. Evaluation of public programs often is a responsibility delegated to local-level managers. The resulting discretion has to be balanced with the need for accountability that is also inherent in public programs. Evaluation is often difficult because outcomes are not readily measurable due to the complexity of the problems faced in the public setting. The Upward Bound program provides an example of this. Upward Bound provides services to students from low-income families and those in which neither parent holds a bachelor’s degree in order to increase the rate at which participants complete secondary education and enroll in and graduate from postsecondary institutions. Upward Bound is implemented and evaluated based upon specifications decided upon at the local level. This discretion granted to local level managers has resulted in wide variations in the way the program is being evaluated. This presents a problem for evaluation and has resulted in inconclusive results as to the success of the program. ...
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Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

Date: August 2011
Creator: Johnson, Ursula Yvette
Description: This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study – Kindergarten Class of 1998 – 1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day kindergarten class in 1998 – 1999. The present study’s sample (N = 8,070) was based on students that had a sampling weight available from the public-use data file. Students were assessed in science achievement at third, fifth, and eighth grades and parents of the students were surveyed at the same time points. Analyses using latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates in an SEM framework revealed a positive relationship between science achievement and parent involvement at eighth grade. Furthermore, there were gender and racial/ethnic differences in parents’ school involvement as a predictor of science achievement. Findings indicated that students with lower initial science achievement scores had a faster rate of growth across time. The achievement gap between low and high achievers in earth, space and life sciences lessened from elementary to middle school. Parents’ involvement with school usually tapers off after elementary school, but due to parent school ...
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The Effects of a Self-Monitoring Procedure on Sustainable Behavior

The Effects of a Self-Monitoring Procedure on Sustainable Behavior

Date: August 2011
Creator: Eni, Chinedu Peter
Description: Self-monitoring procedures are commonly used to assess environmentally sustainable behavior. The current experiment evaluated the effects of a self-monitoring procedure on two sustainable behaviors within a university office. A senior assistant was asked to report on light usage and energy-saver use on the copier in an office break room. Her reports were then compared with independent observations. Results showed that her reports were highly correspondent with independent observations although no change in target behaviors occurred. Changes in behavior occurred when she was asked to engage in the target behaviors. Results suggest that although self-monitoring procedures can correctly assess sustainable behaviors, they may not be suitable for behavior change.
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Responding to Child Sexual Abuse: Exploring the Case Files of Children Under the Age of 6 Admitted to a Children’s Advocacy Center for Evaluation

Responding to Child Sexual Abuse: Exploring the Case Files of Children Under the Age of 6 Admitted to a Children’s Advocacy Center for Evaluation

Date: August 2011
Creator: Glassner, Steven
Description: Research suggests that roughly 25% of women and 10% of men within the United States were sexually abused at some point during childhood. With such high rates of victimization affecting society, the current study explores a population of children under the age of 6 who were suspected of being sexually victimized and thus admitted to a children’s advocacy center (CAC) for evaluation. This investigation contributes to the literature concerning child sexual abuse (CSA) by exploring the characteristics of these alleged victims, the characteristics of their suspected offenders, the alleged victim’s familial demographics characteristics, and by looking at the data pertaining to the incarceration rates of the suspected offenders identified within the sample.
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Analysis of Micro Enterprise Clusters in Developing Countries:  A Case Study of Toluca, Mexico.

Analysis of Micro Enterprise Clusters in Developing Countries: A Case Study of Toluca, Mexico.

Date: August 2011
Creator: Drauschke, Kristin
Description: Businesses cluster to achieve agglomeration benefits. However, research in developing countries suggests that the economic environment limits small business’ propensity to benefit from agglomerations. The study examines the location, networking patterns, formal structures and owner characteristics of 1256 micro businesses from ten industries and thirteen sample areas in Toluca, Mexico. First, the thesis analyses whether clustering has a positive impact on the success rates of the surveyed enterprises, e.g. higher sales per employee. On an industry scale only Retail benefits from agglomerations economies. However, results of the neighborhood data show that specific areas benefit from urbanization economies. Overall, the study finds that businesses located within agglomerations, have higher levels of formalization, networking and professional training, hence constituting a more sophisticated base for economic development. Conclusions can be drawn for development policies and programs, arguing for a more differentiated approach of small business development depending on business location and cluster characteristics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries