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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: School of Visual Arts
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Searching for the Exceptional

Searching for the Exceptional

Date: May 2001
Creator: Sydnor, James R.
Description: During my career producing functional ceramics, I have followed a very traditional working methodology. As with many functional potters, I have always maintained a high level of productivity. Making many similar pieces allows me to develop an idea and to refine it through the working process. My method for developing a new piece is to first design the form, then to decide upon the desired manipulation of the surface planes and surface, and finally to consider the glazing and decoration to refine this new piece of pottery. I work with the new form systematically attempting to isolate and change specific elements, attempting to make each piece in the series more successful. Finally, changes are made to alter the form and decoration in order to achieve an integration of the new design into the present whole of my work. I make every piece intending that quality and craftsmanship will define each piece as an exceptional piece of pottery. Although my intention is that every piece be exceptional, the percentage of exceptional pots is not that high. In each kiln load, a minority of pieces meets my specific criteria of exceptionality. Although the other pots in each kiln load are of high ...
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Exploration through Materials and the Transformation of the Commonplace

Exploration through Materials and the Transformation of the Commonplace

Date: May 2001
Creator: Sides, Luke
Description: The challenge of this project was to present subject matter in a way that did not seem common to the viewer. With this goal in mind, I aimed to switch the traditional roles of material and form in order to aesthetically elevate the commonplace. For my proposed project I combined traditional sculptural materials and processes with commonplace subject matter. I took a chance at the beginning of this project by making something that I had been joking about until I realized that this might be an interesting piece. From this point on I made a conscious effort to make whatever popped in my head. Although I am not a literary person, it seems that with this body of work I backed into what I might call "ironical metaphor."
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Formal Concerns in Conceptual Sculpture

Formal Concerns in Conceptual Sculpture

Date: May 2001
Creator: Stromberg, Matthew Gray
Description: The problem I choose dealt with a new material to use in conceptual art. Since the nature of my work deals with ribbed sculptural forms that explore conceptual abstractions of recorded observations, I investigated a new material called composites. A composite is defined as two or more materials that are combined to share the best qualities of both. Laminated foam core, nylon fabric weave, vinyl, and resin composites may introduce an aesthetic and structural advantage to traditional material such as wood and metal. Innovations in laminated composites and methods of joining unfamiliar materials could offer an advantage for these new sculptures. A series of six ribbed sculptural forms were constructed, which consist of laminated composite material relating to personal observations expressed in my journal in the last quarter of the year 2000. The material was introduced in the desire for a cohesive formal relationship between the concepts and the forms. Patron, 2001 Mixed Media, 19"x 8"x 4"; PDQ, 2001 Mixed Media, 10"x 8"x 2"; PDQ2, 2001 Mixed Media, 21"x27"x3"; Bishop, 2001 Mixed Media, 23"x11"x5"; Coaster, 2001 Mixed Media, 14"x12"x9" and Putsch, 2001 Mixed Media, 69"x48"x24".
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It's All in the Approach

It's All in the Approach

Date: May 2001
Creator: Reyes, Rodolfo
Description: I believe that the ability to change and freely rearrange a drawing or painting by erasing or painting over a mistake allowed me the freedom of spontaneity, whereas the perceived finality of printmaking hindered a freer approach. I began to start thinking of my prints as if they were my paintings or drawings. Fully freeing myself from planning any of my work has led to some unforeseen consequences. I have begun to realize that the work creates a life of its own. Some works have a greater influence over me and tend to live longer in my work. These pieces, whether they are drawings, paintings or prints, start a chain of ideas that push me to investigate new areas of conceptual and formal application related somehow to these first influential works.
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Activating Space within the Object and the Site

Activating Space within the Object and the Site

Date: May 2001
Creator: Provence, Dana Noel
Description: I look at the world as a sculptor, examining physical constructs and implied meanings. My current research developed from my earlier studies of “containment” or, more specifically, “encapsulation,” creating visual, often physical, boundaries around selected content. Encapsulation confers a more active role than “containment”, a process rather than a result. This idea speaks to the issues of form, and asks the viewer to question the outside “shape of the form” in relation to the inside shape and content. My work focuses on exposed interior spaces and forms, allowing the viewer to enter the space physically as well as mentally and psychologically. Built in a large enough scale, the viewer could actually become the content. The sculpture’s interpretation revolves around the seen as well as the unseen. I built this duality into my work by using transparent and opaque materials. I also implemented small diameter stainless steel rod along with the transparent and opaque vinyl to reduce forms to their respective shapes and volumes. This approach allowed me to clean the “slate” of an object’s collective meaning and context, adapting it to the intent of my work.
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From Inside the Home: A Portrait of Mexican Immigrant Women

From Inside the Home: A Portrait of Mexican Immigrant Women

Date: May 2001
Creator: Murillo, Guadalupe
Description: For the past two years my artwork has focused on the cultural issues of a Mexican immigrant community in Fort Worth, Texas. The primary focus has been women and the way in which their homes reflect their blending of two cultures. The occupants of the homes are people that I know personally, including my immediate and extended family as well as friends of my family. Undocumented women usually have the most difficulty in adjusting. Although some do work outside of the home, many of these women spend countless hours inside due to their inability to speak English or drive. These women have little hope of returning to their homeland because their children are being raised in the United States. In order to feel more at home, the women make every effort to re-create the Mexican culture in their new houses. Thus, acculturation takes place with very little cultural loss. Instead of previous strategies of total assimilation, these women blend the two cultures, making it easier to adjust to their new lives.
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Realismo Magico Digital: An Exploration of Self-Identity

Realismo Magico Digital: An Exploration of Self-Identity

Date: May 2001
Creator: Mateos, Cesar Augusto
Description: The internal necessity to rediscover myself constantly drives me back to the country where I spent most of my life, Mexico. I was born and raised in the heart of the world's largest metropolis, Mexico City and through the years I have photographed in locations with important significance for Mexican culture as well as for my personal history. I reorganize and reinvent these places, and by staging models there, I construct my personal interpretation of the Mexican way of life involving the world of “manana” (tomorrow) with its “dictadura perfecta” (perfect dictatorship), where opposite and contradictory situations exist side by side. I am particularly interested in the relationship between people and their environ-ment and I use this theme as a means to explore my own identity as a Mexican. One strategy involves juxtaposing cultural signifiers of Mexican culture. My images are an examination and a projection of my ideals, fears, and dreams about my country and myself.
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Reconstructing Strata Lines of Reality

Reconstructing Strata Lines of Reality

Date: May 2001
Creator: Crawford, William James
Description: This problem in lieu of thesis centers around my work and involves the production of the film trilogy Knife, Fork and Spoon. The methodology for this project comes from my investigation of postmodernist theory and social norms. Three problems are addressed and my professional procedures and practices that helped me find solutions while working on these films are included in chapter two.
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Ceramics Without Clay: An Exploration into Potential

Ceramics Without Clay: An Exploration into Potential

Date: May 2001
Creator: Hart, Christopher David
Description: Investigating the behavior, function and appearance of ceramic materials has proven an enduring point of interest throughout my education. In learning about the vast range of the earth-yielded materials and their physical manifestations in states ranging from wet to dry to fired, I have found myself excited and challenged to seek out ways to expand their presentation. My attention has been repeatedly drawn to the class of ceramic materials that frequently get classified as “glaze ingredients.” Understanding the structural and visual qualities of these minerals and compounds was an interest whether I was making tableware, tiles, or sculpture. For the purposes of this paper, I propose to deal expressly with the physical art-making considerations of material and process as they relate to my work in ceramics. By directing my focus as such, I hope to center my work on a concern that became evident to the art world upon the display of Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain: material equals content.
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Sheep Tipping (It's All About Love)

Sheep Tipping (It's All About Love)

Date: May 2001
Creator: Daniel, Ray
Description: I believe that our individual religious experiences are just that, individual. Each of us has a different reaction to every narration, sermon, situation, and experience. Further, I believe these experiences are understood and maintained in or through abstract thought. In the parable of Jonah and the whale, what do you picture while reading the story? Most of what took place lacks any physical evidence of existence. The voice of the Spirit, the face of God, the sound of prayer in multitude, even the person begin swallowed by the fish, are all abstract in character. My paintings are visual investigations into the idea that most of our religious experiences and concepts are abstract in nature, thought, and experience. Continuing my exploration of how my specific Christian experiences can be expressed through abstract painting, I investigated how the placement of the ellipse or ellipses as a dividing line affects the field and how surface development, layering and the expressiveness of high intensity colors affected the specific experience or Biblical narrative chosen.
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