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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of History
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The Persistence of Castilian Law in Frontier Texas: the Legal Status of Women

The Persistence of Castilian Law in Frontier Texas: the Legal Status of Women

Date: May 1996
Creator: Stuntz, Jean A.
Description: Castilian law developed during the Reconquest of Spain. Women received certain legal rights to persuade them to move to the villages on the expanding frontier. These legal rights were codified in Las Siete Partidas, the monumental work of Castilian law, compiled in the thirteenth century. Under Queen Isabella, Castilian law became the law of all Spain. As Spain discovered, explored, and colonized the New World, Castilian law spread. The Recopilacidn de Los Leyes de Las Indias complied the laws for all the colonies. Texas, as the last area in North America settled by Spain, retained Castilian law. Case law from the Bexar Archives proves this for the Villa of San Fernando(present-day San Antonio). Castilian laws and customs persisted even on the Texas frontier.
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George Orwell As Social Conservative: Populism, Pessimism, and Nationalism in an Organic Community, 1934-43

George Orwell As Social Conservative: Populism, Pessimism, and Nationalism in an Organic Community, 1934-43

Date: August 1995
Creator: Bauhs, James Anthony
Description: This thesis argues that a socially conservative tendency informed much of George Orwell's commentary between 1934 and 1943, and that the same tendency reflected a general European trend. The main sources of this thesis are a large selection of George Orwell's works and a smaller selection of works by Frantz Fanon, Jose Ortega y Gasset, and Antonio Gramsci. This thesis relies upon Orwell's involvement in the Spanish Civil War between 1936 and 1937 and his embrace of nationalism in 1940 as major organizational points of reference. This thesis concludes that Orwell's commentary was an example of a general European conservative reaction against Marxist-Leninist thought.
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The Texas Presidencies : Presidential Leadership in the Republic of Texas, 1836-1845

The Texas Presidencies : Presidential Leadership in the Republic of Texas, 1836-1845

Date: May 1998
Creator: Bridges, Kenneth William
Description: This thesis examines the letters, proclamations, and addresses of the four presidents of the Republic of Texas, David G. Burnet, Sam Houston, Mirabeau B. Lamar, and Anson Jones, to determine how these men faced the major crises of Texas and shaped policy regarding land, relations with Native Americans, finances, internal improvements, annexation by the United States, and foreign relations. Research materials include manuscript and published speeches and letters, diaries, and secondary materials.
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The Cultural Politics of Baldur von Schirach, 1925-1940

The Cultural Politics of Baldur von Schirach, 1925-1940

Date: December 1995
Creator: Koontz, Christopher N. (Christopher Noel)
Description: This thesis examines the career of Baldur von Schirach, who headed the National Socialist Students' Union from 1928 to 1931 and the Hitler Youth from 1931 until 1940.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Political and Congressional Career of John Hancock, 1865-1885

The Political and Congressional Career of John Hancock, 1865-1885

Date: May 1996
Creator: Hancock, W. Daniel
Description: John Hancock was a Texas Unionist. After the Civil War, he became an opponent of the Radical Republicans. He was elected to Congress in 1871 and had some success working on issues important to Texas. As the state was redeemed from Radical Republican rule, Hancock was increasingly attacked for his Unionism. This led to a tough fight for renomination in 1874, and losses in races for the U.S. Senate and renomination in 1876. He was an unsuccessful congressional candidate in 1878, but was elected again in 1882. By then his political influence had waned and he did not seek renomination in 1884. Hancock had the potential to be a major political leader, but lingering resentment to his Unionism hampered his political career.
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Jane McManus Storm Cazneau (1807-1878): a Biography

Jane McManus Storm Cazneau (1807-1878): a Biography

Date: May 1999
Creator: Hudson, Linda Sybert
Description: Jane Maria Eliza McManus, born near Troy, New York, educated at Emma Willard's Troy Female Seminary, promoted the American maritime frontier and wrote on Mexican, Central American, and Caribbean affairs. Called a "terror with her pen," under the pen name of Cora Montgomery, she published 100 columns in 6 newspapers, 20 journal articles and book reviews, 15 books and pamphlets, and edited 5 newspapers and journals between 1839 and 1878.
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Fortification Renaissance: the Roman Origins of the Trace Italienne

Fortification Renaissance: the Roman Origins of the Trace Italienne

Date: May 2013
Creator: Vigus, Robert T.
Description: The Military Revolution thesis posited by Michael Roberts and expanded upon by Geoffrey Parker places the trace italienne style of fortification of the early modern period as something that is a novel creation, borne out of the minds of Renaissance geniuses. Research shows, however, that the key component of the trace italienne, the angled bastion, has its roots in Greek and Roman writing, and in extant constructions by Roman and Byzantine engineers. The angled bastion of the trace italienne was yet another aspect of the resurgent Greek and Roman culture characteristic of the Renaissance along with the traditions of medicine, mathematics, and science. The writings of the ancients were bolstered by physical examples located in important trading and pilgrimage routes. Furthermore, the geometric layout of the trace italienne stems from Ottoman fortifications that preceded it by at least two hundred years. The Renaissance geniuses combined ancient bastion designs with eastern geometry to match a burgeoning threat in the rising power of the siege cannon.
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The Strategic and Operational Debate Over Operation Anvil: the Allied Invasion of Southern France in August, 1944

The Strategic and Operational Debate Over Operation Anvil: the Allied Invasion of Southern France in August, 1944

Date: May 2013
Creator: Zinsou, Cameron
Description: In August, 1944, the Allies embarked on one of the "two supreme operations of 1944," Operation Anvil/Dragoon. It is an operation that almost did not happen. Envisioned as a direct supporting operation of Overlord, Anvil soon ran into troubles. Other operations taking away resources away from Anvil in addition to opposition from the highest levels of Allied command threatened Anvil. This thesis chronicles the evolution of this debate, as well as shed light on one of the most overlooked and successful operations the Allies embarked on in World War II.
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The Ho Chi Minh Trail and Operation Commando Hunt: the Failure of an Aerial Interdiction Campaign

The Ho Chi Minh Trail and Operation Commando Hunt: the Failure of an Aerial Interdiction Campaign

Date: May 2013
Creator: Ha, Dong Nguyen
Description: In November 1968, the United States 7th Air Force began a year-round bombing campaign of southeastern Laos to slow the infiltration of Vietnamese troops and supplies into South Vietnam. Despite the massive amount of bombs dropped, the campaigns of Operation Commando Hunt were unable to stop the Communists from sending men and materiel down the Ho Chi Minh Trail to support their operations in the south. This thesis seeks to show that President Lyndon Johnson's decision to stop bombing North Vietnam and President Richard Nixon's Vietnamization policy, along with the North Vietnamese's determination to keep their supply route open, combined to prevent Operation Commando Hunt from achieving its goal.
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Adapting on the Plains: the United States Army's Evolution of Mobile Warfare in Texas, 1848-1859

Adapting on the Plains: the United States Army's Evolution of Mobile Warfare in Texas, 1848-1859

Date: May 2013
Creator: Buchy, Mark B.
Description: The Army, despite having been vexed for a century on how to effectively fight the Plains Indians, ultimately defeated them only a decade after the Civil War. This thesis will bring to the forefront those individuals who adapted fighting techniques and ultimately achieved victories on the Texas frontier before the Civil War. The majority of these victories came as a result of mounted warfare under the direction of lower ranking officers in control of smaller forces. The tactic of fighting Indians from horseback was shown to be effective by the Rangers and later emulated by the Army.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries