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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: School of Visual Arts
Man-Bull

Man-Bull

Date: August 2001
Creator: Staples, James M.
Description: This thesis presents a body of work that acknowledges Rural American landscape and the importance of its conservation. This conservation is not restricted to recognizing the rural landscape as strictly a natural resource, rather, a spiritual place that fosters a positive side of humanity.
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Mis Raices, Mi Hogar: My Roots, My Home

Mis Raices, Mi Hogar: My Roots, My Home

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Ramirez, Diana C.
Description: The lack of ancestral record instilled in me this desire to hold on to memories, and to leave my children with permanent records or memories of our family. My desire to work with metals was inspired by the need to encapsulate a record of memories through a more permanent means. The durability of steel, I feel, can be used as a diary, in the form of an artistic and lasting object, rather than written words. The need to leave behind a legacy inspired me to explore the use of lockets and containers that have some resemblance to a reliquary. My intent was not one of religious purpose, but rather to create a locket or container that would reflect or contain symbols of where one's roots begin, the home.
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Round

Round

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Pepper, Jennifer Whayne
Description: My approach to the art making process is a kind of poetic reverie on forms and spaces. Webster’s Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary defines reverie as “a state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a daydream, a fantastic, visionary or unpractical idea.” It is a romantic notion that has less to do with the big questions of existence than it does the incidental parts of daily existence. Reverie is a state of mind that comes from being receptive and finding simple pleasure in the affects of imagination. My paintings, drawings and sculpture evolve out of the freedom to imagine shapes and spaces that describe different kinds of interactions. They come from recollection, awareness, and observation of the diverse sensual phenomena that surrounds me. The variety of interactions between forms such as contrast, imbalance, balance or synchronicity, have the potential to evoke various aspects of being: vulnerability, uncertainty, confidence, and determination. Possible interactions between shapes and spaces are what intrigue me most. Recently, I expanded the investigation of form to include objects and consideration of space. As the scale of my paintings and drawings grew, I became interested in the effects of three-dimensional objects in a space, such as a gallery. My inquiry ...
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Prototypes: Hand Masters Machine

Prototypes: Hand Masters Machine

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Date: May 2001
Creator: Milton, Robert L.
Description: I investigated several problems I have found concerning contemporary jewelry design. These problems are linked to the industrialization of jewelry making. The industrialization of jewelry making led to the preference of using less precious metal, of using Prong, Crown, and Channel stone-settings, and of using high polished mirror finish for surface treatment. My work addressed the prominence of metal in jewelry design and alternate forms and techniques of stone-setting and surface treatment.
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Searching for the Exceptional

Searching for the Exceptional

Date: May 2001
Creator: Sydnor, James R.
Description: During my career producing functional ceramics, I have followed a very traditional working methodology. As with many functional potters, I have always maintained a high level of productivity. Making many similar pieces allows me to develop an idea and to refine it through the working process. My method for developing a new piece is to first design the form, then to decide upon the desired manipulation of the surface planes and surface, and finally to consider the glazing and decoration to refine this new piece of pottery. I work with the new form systematically attempting to isolate and change specific elements, attempting to make each piece in the series more successful. Finally, changes are made to alter the form and decoration in order to achieve an integration of the new design into the present whole of my work. I make every piece intending that quality and craftsmanship will define each piece as an exceptional piece of pottery. Although my intention is that every piece be exceptional, the percentage of exceptional pots is not that high. In each kiln load, a minority of pieces meets my specific criteria of exceptionality. Although the other pots in each kiln load are of high ...
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Exploration through Materials and the Transformation of the Commonplace

Exploration through Materials and the Transformation of the Commonplace

Date: May 2001
Creator: Sides, Luke
Description: The challenge of this project was to present subject matter in a way that did not seem common to the viewer. With this goal in mind, I aimed to switch the traditional roles of material and form in order to aesthetically elevate the commonplace. For my proposed project I combined traditional sculptural materials and processes with commonplace subject matter. I took a chance at the beginning of this project by making something that I had been joking about until I realized that this might be an interesting piece. From this point on I made a conscious effort to make whatever popped in my head. Although I am not a literary person, it seems that with this body of work I backed into what I might call "ironical metaphor."
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Formal Concerns in Conceptual Sculpture

Formal Concerns in Conceptual Sculpture

Date: May 2001
Creator: Stromberg, Matthew Gray
Description: The problem I choose dealt with a new material to use in conceptual art. Since the nature of my work deals with ribbed sculptural forms that explore conceptual abstractions of recorded observations, I investigated a new material called composites. A composite is defined as two or more materials that are combined to share the best qualities of both. Laminated foam core, nylon fabric weave, vinyl, and resin composites may introduce an aesthetic and structural advantage to traditional material such as wood and metal. Innovations in laminated composites and methods of joining unfamiliar materials could offer an advantage for these new sculptures. A series of six ribbed sculptural forms were constructed, which consist of laminated composite material relating to personal observations expressed in my journal in the last quarter of the year 2000. The material was introduced in the desire for a cohesive formal relationship between the concepts and the forms. Patron, 2001 Mixed Media, 19"x 8"x 4"; PDQ, 2001 Mixed Media, 10"x 8"x 2"; PDQ2, 2001 Mixed Media, 21"x27"x3"; Bishop, 2001 Mixed Media, 23"x11"x5"; Coaster, 2001 Mixed Media, 14"x12"x9" and Putsch, 2001 Mixed Media, 69"x48"x24".
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It's All in the Approach

It's All in the Approach

Date: May 2001
Creator: Reyes, Rodolfo
Description: I believe that the ability to change and freely rearrange a drawing or painting by erasing or painting over a mistake allowed me the freedom of spontaneity, whereas the perceived finality of printmaking hindered a freer approach. I began to start thinking of my prints as if they were my paintings or drawings. Fully freeing myself from planning any of my work has led to some unforeseen consequences. I have begun to realize that the work creates a life of its own. Some works have a greater influence over me and tend to live longer in my work. These pieces, whether they are drawings, paintings or prints, start a chain of ideas that push me to investigate new areas of conceptual and formal application related somehow to these first influential works.
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Activating Space within the Object and the Site

Activating Space within the Object and the Site

Date: May 2001
Creator: Provence, Dana Noel
Description: I look at the world as a sculptor, examining physical constructs and implied meanings. My current research developed from my earlier studies of “containment” or, more specifically, “encapsulation,” creating visual, often physical, boundaries around selected content. Encapsulation confers a more active role than “containment”, a process rather than a result. This idea speaks to the issues of form, and asks the viewer to question the outside “shape of the form” in relation to the inside shape and content. My work focuses on exposed interior spaces and forms, allowing the viewer to enter the space physically as well as mentally and psychologically. Built in a large enough scale, the viewer could actually become the content. The sculpture’s interpretation revolves around the seen as well as the unseen. I built this duality into my work by using transparent and opaque materials. I also implemented small diameter stainless steel rod along with the transparent and opaque vinyl to reduce forms to their respective shapes and volumes. This approach allowed me to clean the “slate” of an object’s collective meaning and context, adapting it to the intent of my work.
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Realismo Magico Digital: An Exploration of Self-Identity

Realismo Magico Digital: An Exploration of Self-Identity

Date: May 2001
Creator: Mateos, Cesar Augusto
Description: The internal necessity to rediscover myself constantly drives me back to the country where I spent most of my life, Mexico. I was born and raised in the heart of the world's largest metropolis, Mexico City and through the years I have photographed in locations with important significance for Mexican culture as well as for my personal history. I reorganize and reinvent these places, and by staging models there, I construct my personal interpretation of the Mexican way of life involving the world of “manana” (tomorrow) with its “dictadura perfecta” (perfect dictatorship), where opposite and contradictory situations exist side by side. I am particularly interested in the relationship between people and their environ-ment and I use this theme as a means to explore my own identity as a Mexican. One strategy involves juxtaposing cultural signifiers of Mexican culture. My images are an examination and a projection of my ideals, fears, and dreams about my country and myself.
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