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  Access Rights: Public
  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: English
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Do Not Eat Fish from These Waters and Other Stories

Do Not Eat Fish from These Waters and Other Stories

Date: August 1995
Creator: Taylor, William Nelson
Description: Earl suffers from a guilty obsession with a monster catfish. Eddie Klomp searches dog tracks for the ghosts of his lost childhood. Mike Towns is a hopeless blues musician who loses everything he cares for. Blair Evans learns to love a pesky wart. Americana becomes confused with the difference between knowledge and sex. Do Not Eat Fish from These Waters And Other Stories is a collection of short stories that explores the strange and often defeated lives of these Southern characters (and one from the point-of-view of a feral hog). Each man, woman, and hog flails through a period of potential metamorphosis trying to find some sort of meaning and worth in the past, present and future. Not all of these characters succeed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Do Non-Native Grammars Allow Verbs to Raise to Agreement?

Do Non-Native Grammars Allow Verbs to Raise to Agreement?

Date: December 1995
Creator: Grace, Sabine Thepaut
Description: The purpose of this thesis is to determine whether the setting of the verb movement parameter in L2 is dependent on agreement acquisition. The Optionality hypothesis (Eubank, 1994) is tested by examining the L2 grammar of Chinese learners of English. To test this hypothesis, the sentence matching procedure originally described in Freedman and Forster (1985) is used. It is found that no current theory truly accounts for the results that are obtained.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Maelstrom: the Last Coyote Tale

Maelstrom: the Last Coyote Tale

Date: December 1997
Creator: Claiborne, J. Taylor (John Taylor)
Description: It is a dark future, where corporations have taken the place of governmental bodies, and Earth is a myth, forgotten in the reconstruction after the Second Dark Age. One man--a clone--investigates a murder [that] leads him deep into a spirit quest of his own that will answer the questions of Man's heritage as well as his own identity. This story is a science fiction, but it is similar in structure to a Coyote tale and involves quite a bit of Navajo mythology. The use of Native American imagery is not an attempt to capitalize on another culture, but rather to study the culture and use allegorical elements that transcend many cultures. It must also be noted that non-Native American writers wrote all texts available on the subject. This fact should be taken into consideration by the reader.
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Women's and Men's Perceptions Regarding Perceived Speaker Sex and Politeness of Given Utterances

Women's and Men's Perceptions Regarding Perceived Speaker Sex and Politeness of Given Utterances

Date: May 1995
Creator: Johnson, Deanna Michelle
Description: Women's and men's responses regarding perceived speaker sex and the politeness of given utterances were examined through the use of a questionnaire administered to 90 people, 45 men and 45 women. The questionnaire required respondents to rate the politeness of each utterance and label each as being more likely spoken by a man or by a woman. Factors possibly affecting perceptions--such as power, prestige, and the stereotypical conversational structures of both men and women--were addressed through others' research in this area. Additionally, all tested sentences were analyzed in light of linguistic politeness theory regarding on-record and off-record speech. This analysis details each utterance through examining the type of politeness strategy each utterance typifies.
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Terlingua

Terlingua

Date: December 1995
Creator: Gibbons, Beverly (Beverly Ann)
Description: Terlingua includes a scholarly foreword on illusion and reality in the writing of fiction. Five short stories are contained in this thesis. "Terlingua" relates the story of two students on a road trip who give a ride to a mysterious woman. "Zoology" is the first person narrative of a zoology graduate who picks up a socialite. "What about Sonoma?" is the story of two misfits whose affair comes to an end. "Losing Ground" examines a couple's relationship that changes because of the man's bowling injury and the woman's unexpected pregnancy. "The Jury Remembers Everything" is about a woman who becomes hesitant to marry her fiancé when she learns her mother may have once run away with a mortician. "Losing Ground" is a drama, and the other four stories are comedies.
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Melville's Vision of Society : A Study of the Paradoxical Interrelations in Melville's Major Novels

Melville's Vision of Society : A Study of the Paradoxical Interrelations in Melville's Major Novels

Date: May 1995
Creator: Terzis, Timothy R. (Timothy Randolph)
Description: I hold that Melvillean society consists of paradoxical relationships between civilization and barbarianism, evil and good, the corrupt and the natural, the individual and the collective, and the primitive and the advanced. Because these terms are arbitrary and, in the context of the novels, somewhat interchangeable, I explore Melville's thoughts as those emerge in the following groups of novels: Typee, Omoo, and White-Jacket demonstrate the paradox of Melvillean society; Redburn, Moby-Dick, and Mardi illustrate the corrupting effects of capitalism and individualism; and The Confidence-Man, Israel Potter, and Pierre depict a collapsed paradox and the disintegration of Melville's society.
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The Fool-Saint and the Fat Lady: an Exploration of Freaks and Saints in Robertson Davies's The Deptford Trilogy

The Fool-Saint and the Fat Lady: an Exploration of Freaks and Saints in Robertson Davies's The Deptford Trilogy

Date: December 1994
Creator: McClinton, Jennifer A. (Jennifer Anne)
Description: In The Deptford Trilogy, Robertson Davies uses the circus freaks and the Roman Catholic Saints who influence the main characters to illustrate the duality inherent in all human beings.
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Anatomy of Loss

Anatomy of Loss

Date: August 1995
Creator: Behlen, Shawn Lee
Description: Anatomy of Loss contains a foreword, which discusses the place of autobiography in fiction, and five original short stories.
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W. B. Yeats's "The Cap and Bells": Its Sources in Occultism

W. B. Yeats's "The Cap and Bells": Its Sources in Occultism

Date: May 1995
Creator: Saylor, Lawrence (Lawrence Emory)
Description: While it may seem that "The Cap and Bells" finds its primary source in Yeats's love for Maud Gonne, the poem is also symbolic of his search for truth in occultism. In the 1880s and 90s Yeats coupled his reading of Shelley with a formal study of magic in the Golden Dawn, and the poem is a blend of Shelleyan and occult influences. The essay explores the Shelleyan/occult motif of death and rebirth through examining the poem's relation to the rituals, teachings, and symbols of the Golden Dawn. The essay examines the poem's relation to the Cabalistic Tree of Life, the Hanged Man of the Tarot, two Golden Dawn diagrams on the Garden of Eden, and the concept of Kundalini.
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Specter

Specter

Date: May 2013
Creator: Sharpe, Mary Victoria
Description: This dissertation is a collection of poems preceded by a critical preface. The preface considers the major changes within the elegy from the traditional English elegy—the touchstone poems for this genre being Milton's "Lycidas," Shelley's "Adonais," and Tennyson's "In Memoriam"—to the contemporary elegy and argues that many of these changes showcase contemporary elegists' active refusal and reversal of the time-honored traditions of the form. The preface is divided into an introduction and three sections, each of which recognizes and explores one significant alteration—or reversal—to the conventions of the form as established by early English elegists. The first discusses the traditional elegiac tradition of consolation in which the speaker, after displaying a series of emotions in reaction to the death of a loved one, ultimately finds comfort in the knowledge that the deceased lives eternally in heaven. This convention is contrasted with a common contemporary rhetorical movement in which the speaker not only lacks comfort by the end of the poem, but often refuses any kind of consolation, preferring instead to continue his grief. The second recognizes and explores the traditional elegiac tradition in which the speaker, listing the virtues of the beloved, replaces the real, historical person with a symbol ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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