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 Degree Discipline: Performance
Holocaust Song Literature: Expressing the Human Experiences and Emotions of the Holocaust through Song Literature, Focusing on Song Literature of Hirsh Glick, Mordechai Gebirtig, and Simon Sargon

Holocaust Song Literature: Expressing the Human Experiences and Emotions of the Holocaust through Song Literature, Focusing on Song Literature of Hirsh Glick, Mordechai Gebirtig, and Simon Sargon

Date: August 2005
Creator: Nedvin, Brian
Description: During the years of the Holocaust, song literature was needed to fulfill the unique needs of people caught in an unimaginable nightmare. The twelve years between 1933 and 1945 were filled with a brutal display of man's inhumanity to man. Despite the horrific conditions or perhaps because of them, the Jewish people made music, and in particular, they sang. Whether built on a new or an old melody, the Holocaust song literature continues to speak to those of us who are willing to listen. This body of work tells the world that these people lived, suffered, longed for vengeance, loved, dreamed, prayed, and tragically, died. This repertoire of songs is part of the legacy, the very soul of the Jewish people. This study contains a brief look at the historical circumstances, and through the song literature of Hirsh Glick, Mordechai Gebirtig and Simon Sargon, life within the ghetto, the concentration camp, the decisions families had to make, the choices to fight back against incredible odds, the place of faith within this nightmare, and a look at the lives and works of the composers themselves.
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A Combination of Asian Language with Foundations of Western Music: An Analysis of Isang Yun's Salomo for Flute Solo or Alto Flute Solo

A Combination of Asian Language with Foundations of Western Music: An Analysis of Isang Yun's Salomo for Flute Solo or Alto Flute Solo

Date: August 2005
Creator: Hur, Dae-Sik
Description: This dissertation introduces a Korean composer, Isang Yun (1917-1995), who embraced European traditions but retained Asian characteristics in his compositions. Attending the 1958 summer course in Darmstadt in Germany, Yun was strongly influenced by the avant-garde style of Boulez, Stockhausen, Nono, and Cage. In addition to his work as a composer, Yun distinguished himself, as one of the most important Asian composers to blend Eastern and Western music; and although his musical training focused on Western music, he continued the pursuit of Eastern sounds and philosophies throughout his musical life. Imprisoned in 1967 by the South Korean government, Isang Yun's music, particularly in later life, incorporates his beliefs on social and political issues together with musical ideas. Although his love of country was deep, Isang Yun was not allowed to return to South Korea, and he lived in Germany for the remainder of his professional life. In this study, my purpose is to investigate the development of Yun's musical ideas from his acceptance of Taoism four structures in the world: the Tao, heaven, earth, and man. The presence of both Western and Eastern influences in Yun's music provides the basic of his musical style, and analysis of Salomo für Altoflöte ...
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The 1986 National Endowment for the Arts Commission: An introspective analysis of two marimba works, Reflections on the Nature of Water by Jacob Druckman and Velocities by Joseph Schwantner, together with three recitals of selected works by Keiko Abe, Christopher Deane, Peter Klatzow, Wayne Siegel, Gitta Steiner and others.

The 1986 National Endowment for the Arts Commission: An introspective analysis of two marimba works, Reflections on the Nature of Water by Jacob Druckman and Velocities by Joseph Schwantner, together with three recitals of selected works by Keiko Abe, Christopher Deane, Peter Klatzow, Wayne Siegel, Gitta Steiner and others.

Date: August 2005
Creator: Fang, I-Jen
Description: The marimba is rapidly achieving greater importance as a solo percussion instrument. Solo compositions for the marimba have been commissioned and performed only in the last sixty years. The 1986 National Endowment for the Arts Solo Marimba Commission is considered one of the most important commissioning projects in the history of marimba literature. Two compositions created through this project, Velocities by Joseph Schwantner and Reflections on the Nature of Water by Jacob Druckman have become two of the most influential works in contemporary marimba music. This thesis will focus on a historical perspective of the project, as well as theoretical aspects and performance issues related to these two compositions. The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) issued a consortium commissioning grant through the Percussive Arts Society (PAS) in 1986 to three internationally renowned marimbists, William Moersch, Leigh Howard Stevens and Gordon Stout. Three Pulitzer Prize winners were brought together to compose three new works for the marimba. The resulting pieces were: Reflections on the Nature of Water by Jacob Druckman, Velocities by Joseph Schwantner, and Islands from Archipelago: Autumn Island by Roger Reynolds. A brief history of the classical concert marimba and the development of solo marimba literature is provided ...
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Hemispheres for Wind Ensemble by Joseph Turrin: A Critical Analysis

Hemispheres for Wind Ensemble by Joseph Turrin: A Critical Analysis

Date: August 2005
Creator: deAlbuquerque, Joan
Description: Hemispheres is a three-movement work for winds written by Joseph Turrin in May 2002. Commissioned by Kurt Masur for the New York Philharmonic, he wished to include a piece exclusively for winds and percussion in the programming of his farewell concert that commemorated his eleven years as Music Director. The work is in three movements: Genesis, Earth Canto, and Rajas which represent three different cultural views of creation. Formally, this work is based structurally and thematically on melody rather than harmony. This analysis focuses on three main tools which unify this work. The first is that thematic material from the first movement is reintroduced and developed in the second and third movements. The second is a consistently reoccurring rhythmic grouping in threes. This three note motive, found in all three movements, is used both melodically and as an accompaniment. The third is the unifying pitch center of C. Through an economy of musical means, Turrin composed Hemispheres with only a minimal number of themes and motives, each developed through the course of all three movements.
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Miguel Yuste: His Works for Clarinet and His Influence on the Spanish Clarinet School of Playing in the Twentieth Century, A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Bax, Mason, Khachaturian, Chausson, Bozza, Beethoven, and Others

Miguel Yuste: His Works for Clarinet and His Influence on the Spanish Clarinet School of Playing in the Twentieth Century, A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Bax, Mason, Khachaturian, Chausson, Bozza, Beethoven, and Others

Date: May 2005
Creator: McLaren, Malena Rachel
Description: The popularity of the clarinet in Spain is second only to that of the guitar, and there is a rich tradition of clarinet playing that is accompanied by an equally rich repertoire of music for the clarinet by Spanish composers. The works for clarinet and piano by Miguel Yuste (1870-1947) are among this little known repertoire. In the early twentieth century it was thought that Miguel Yuste wrote over one hundred works for clarinet. However, current research suggests that this is incorrect. What is known is that seven works for clarinet and piano have been published. Miguel Yuste and his music are pivotal in the establishment of the strong clarinet tradition for which Spain is presently known. In his thirty years as the clarinet professor at the Real Conservatorio Superior de Música de Madrid (1910-1940), Miguel Yuste's music and pedagogical ideas became, and continue to be among the foundations of Spanish clarinet playing. This project discusses each published work and presents current research on the works composed for clarinet and piano by Miguel Yuste. After a brief history of Spain's music and social climate in which it developed (Ch. 2), this document discusses the introduction of the clarinet in Spain, ...
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Philosophical Implications on Trombone Performance and Pedagogy in Andre Lafosse's Curriculum at the Paris Conservatory

Philosophical Implications on Trombone Performance and Pedagogy in Andre Lafosse's Curriculum at the Paris Conservatory

Date: May 2005
Creator: English, Bryan
Description: During his tenure as the professor of trombone at the Paris Conservatory, Andre Lafosse wrote the Traite de Pedagogie du Trombone a Coulisse addressing trombone pedagogy that was to be studied in conjunction with his method and etude books, Methode Complete de Trombone and Vade Mecum du Tromboniste. The pedagogic philosophy reflects Lafosse's own experiences as an orchestral musician in France in the early 20th century. Lafosse designed and used his treatise to prepare students to be effective teachers after their graduation from the Conservatory. The scope of preparation for Lafosse's trombone class, however, was limited. He did not attempt to provide a text or tutor that would prepare trombonists for any career in music: Lafosse was primarily concerned with orchestral trombone playing, as reflected in musical exercises, instrument designation, and repertoire references. Solo performance skills are also explained at length in his treatise, and Lafosse includes his own solo transcriptions in the curriculum. This emphasis placed on performing as a soloist appears to oppose Lafosse's implied preference for orchestral performance. Throughout his career as a trombone professor Andre Lafosse compiled and wrote music that emphasized elements of trombone technique based on the French solo and orchestral repertoire. His primary ...
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Camille Saint-Säens'  Piano Concerto No. 5 in F Major, Opus 103: An Analytical Study of Form, Compositional Techniques, and a Performance Perspective

Camille Saint-Säens' Piano Concerto No. 5 in F Major, Opus 103: An Analytical Study of Form, Compositional Techniques, and a Performance Perspective

Date: December 2004
Creator: Yoo, Seung Won
Description: The majority of books about Saint-Säens cover his life, compositions, contemporaries, and French music in general. Although his life is well documented, most sources present only brief analyses of his works; there is not one single comprehensive and exhaustive study of the Piano Concerto in F Major, Opus 103, available in the current literature. This study aims at filling the gap by providing other musicians interested in performing this piece with an initial study-guide. The research for this study focuses on several aspects of Saint-Säens' music. The currently available literature and past research is thoroughly examined, appraised, and quoted when relevant to the discussion. The original score of the concerto is analyzed regarding its form, compositional style, and performance indications. Diagrams, charts, and musical examples are presented to illustrate and substantiate the researcher's conclusions. Chapter I presents the topic and purpose of this study, a brief biography of Saint-Säens, a chronological overview of his five piano concertos, and the historical background of the Piano Concerto No. 5 in F Major, Opus 103. Chapter II presents a formal analysis and a compositional analysis of Opus 103. Chapter III presents a perspective of Saint-Säens playing style and performance recommendations by the author. ...
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The Snare Drum as a Solo Concert Instrument: An In-Depth Study of Works by Milton Babbitt, John Cage, Dan Senn, and Stuart Saunders Smith, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Keiko Abe, Daniel Levitan, Askell Masson, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Others

The Snare Drum as a Solo Concert Instrument: An In-Depth Study of Works by Milton Babbitt, John Cage, Dan Senn, and Stuart Saunders Smith, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Keiko Abe, Daniel Levitan, Askell Masson, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Others

Date: December 2004
Creator: Baker, Jason Colby
Description: This dissertation discusses the potential of the snare drum as a solo concert instrument. Four pieces from a collection entitled The Noble Snare are used for demonstration ("Homily" by Milton Babbitt, "Composed Improvisation for Snare Drum" by John Cage, "Peeping Tom" by Dan Senn, and "The Noble Snare" by Stuart Saunders Smith). In the absence of many traditional musical devices (i.e. melody and harmony), alternative means of expression are used by the composer. Each piece is discussed with regard to its distinctive compositional approach and inherent performance issues. Information is also given pertaining to the background of the Noble Snare series. This includes: the inspiration for the project, editorial issues, and its influence on snare drum performance. Much of this research was completed through interviews by with author with Sylvia Smith, publisher of The Noble Snare and owner of Smith Publications.
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Luciano Berio's  Sequenza III: The Use of Vocal Gesture and the Genre of the Mad Scene

Luciano Berio's Sequenza III: The Use of Vocal Gesture and the Genre of the Mad Scene

Date: August 2004
Creator: Edwards, Patti Yvonne
Description: Sequenza III was written in the mid -1960s and is widely available for study and performance, but how can this work be defined? Is it a series of sounds, or phonemes, or the anxious mutterings of a woman? Is it performance art or an operatic mad scene? Sequenza III could be all of these or something else entirely. Writing about my method of preparation will work to allay some of my own and other performer's fears about attempting this unusual repertory. Very little in this piece is actually performed on pitch, and even then the pitches are not definite. The intervals on the five-line staff are to be observed but the singer may choose to sing within her own vocal range. The notation that Berio has used is new and specific, but the emotional markings and dynamics drawn from these markings permit a variety of interpretive decisions by the performer. There is a very brief text and no actual melody, so where does one begin? As a composer, Berio was often responsive to external stimuli. Quotation of his earlier works and the works of others was a common tool of his technique. By comparing Sequenza III with other works by ...
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A Study of Selected Clarinet Music of Brian Israel

A Study of Selected Clarinet Music of Brian Israel

Date: August 2004
Creator: Cifelli, Cheryl
Description: It is the goal of this document to bring to the attention of the public the compositions of Brian Israel, an American Jewish composer who died of leukemia in 1986 at the age of 35. This document contains a biography of the composer, information on where to obtain the scores, texts to the poems of Kenneth Patchen, as well as a study of three, selected clarinet works, which trace his compositional development. The Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, a neo-classical work, is representative of his early style, using classical forms with non-traditional harmonies. It is comprised of three movements, Allegro assai, Andante, and Vivace. The chamber work Lovesongs, Lions, and Lullabyes, for soprano, clarinet, and piano, is a progressive work that experiments with text painting, chord splitting, mode mixture, and an increasing harmonic language, and is inspired by the poetry of Kenneth Patchen, a World War II poet. There are four movements to this work: "O, sleeping falls the maiden snow," "O when I take my love out walking," "The lions of fire," and "I have lighted the candles Mary." The Concerto for Clarinet and Wind Ensemble is a textless, programmatic work that uses chromatic fragments and displaced octaves to ...
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