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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Kinesiology
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Evaluating the Pulse Sensor as a Low-Cost and Portable Measurement of Blood Pulse Waveform

Evaluating the Pulse Sensor as a Low-Cost and Portable Measurement of Blood Pulse Waveform

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Date: May 2016
Creator: Smithers, Breana Gray
Description: This study was aimed at determining whether the digital volume pulse waveform using the Pulse Sensor can be used to extract features related to arterial compliance. The Pulse Sensor, a low-cost photoplethysmograph, measures green light reflection in the finger and generates output, which is indicative of blood flow and can be read by the low-cost Arduino UNO™. The Pulse Sensor code was modified to increase the sampling frequency and to capture the data in a file, which is subsequently used for waveform analysis using programs written in the R system. Waveforms were obtained using the Pulse Sensor during two 30-s periods of seated rest, in each of 44 participants, who were between the ages of 20 and 80 years. For each cardiac cycle, the first four derivatives of the waveform were calculated and low-pass filtered by convolution before every differentiation step. The program was written to extract 19 features from the pulse waveform and its derivatives. These features were selected from those that have been reported to relate to the physiopathology of hemodynamics. Results indicate that subtle features of the pulse waveform can be calculated from the fourth derivative. Feature misidentification occurred in cases of saturation or low voltage and ...
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The Effect of Post-resistance Exercise Alcohol Ingestion on Lps-stimulated Cytokines

The Effect of Post-resistance Exercise Alcohol Ingestion on Lps-stimulated Cytokines

Date: August 2015
Creator: Levitt, Danielle E.
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of post-resistance exercise alcohol ingestion on LPS-stimulated production of IFNγ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. Recreationally resistance-trained men (n = 10, 25 ± 3 yr, 177 ± 7 cm, 83.8 ± 15.7 kg, 14.8 ± 8.5% body fat) and women (n = 8, 23 ± 2 yr, 161 ± 3 cm, 59.5 ± 6.0 kg, 26.5 ± 3.0% body fat) completed the study. Participants visited the laboratory for an initial visit at which time they were screened, familiarized with procedures, and had their 1-repetition maximum (1RM) back squat tested. Subsequently, participants visited the laboratory 2 more times and completed 2 identical heavy resistance exercise bouts (6 sets of 10 repetitions of 80% 1RM back squat) after which a beverage, either containing alcohol (alcohol condition, ALC; 1.09 g EtOH per kg fat free mass) or water (placebo condition, PLA), was administered. Blood samples were collected before exercise (PRE), and at 3 hours (3h) and 5 hours (5h) after exercise. Samples were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cultured overnight. Supernatant was collected and analyzed for IFNγ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. A significant (p < 0.05) main effect for time ...
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The Effects of a Psychosocial Environment on College Women’s Exercise Regulations and Social Physique Anxiety

The Effects of a Psychosocial Environment on College Women’s Exercise Regulations and Social Physique Anxiety

Date: May 2015
Creator: Alvarez, Ana
Description: A positive psychosocial intervention comprised of high autonomy support, task-involvement, and caring was implemented in physical activity classes to examine its effects on college women’s basic psychological needs (i.e. autonomy, competence, relatedness), exercise regulations (i.e. external, introjected, identified, integrated, intrinsic) and social physique anxiety (SPA). We hypothesized that at the end of the semester, participants in the intervention group (N = 73) would report greater need satisfaction, more self-determined regulations and less SPA than participants in the non-intervention group (N = 60). At T1 and T2, both the intervention and non-intervention participants reported “agreeing” with experiencing an autonomy supportive, task-involving, and caring environment. Furthermore, both groups at T1 and T2 reported moderate SPA. No significant group differences were found at T1. At T2, significant group differences were observed in the intervention and non-intervention groups’ report of external regulation and intrinsic regulation. The results suggests that group exercise instructors are capable of creating a positive psychosocial environment to enhance students’ intrinsic motivation.
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The Influence of Psychological Momentum on Basketball Shooting Performance

The Influence of Psychological Momentum on Basketball Shooting Performance

Date: May 2015
Creator: Harris, Connor
Description: The purpose of this research was to examine the influence of fictitious scoring updates on psychological momentum (PM) and athletic performance in a competitive basketball setting. The participants included in this study were 50 male undergraduate students who reported having played basketball previously and qualified by being able to make more than 24% (12 out of 50) of their 3-point shots in a pre-trial session. Participants were told that they were competing in a 50 shot, 3-point shooting competition against another individual, equal in ability. After every 10 shots, participants were given a fabricated score update and answered four questions used to measure PM. Results showed that the fictitious score updates significantly (p < .01) influenced participants’ PM scores, where those who were told they led had higher PM scores than those who were told they trailed. As for shooting performance, no significant differences (p = .76) were found between positive and negative PM states for participants who reported experiencing both during the competition. Together, these findings suggest that manufactured score updates can influence PM, but resultant performance differences may not exist. Results of this study lend support to the notion that PM is experienced by athletes. However, when examining ...
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Physiological and Psychological Effects of an Acute Stressor: Comparing Coping Strategies Among Very Physically Active and Less Active Adults

Physiological and Psychological Effects of an Acute Stressor: Comparing Coping Strategies Among Very Physically Active and Less Active Adults

Date: May 2014
Creator: Brandt, Grace A.
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine whether physical activity status of healthy adult males (N = 59) while in a coping strategy condition (association, disassociation, or control) influences psychophysiological responses to an acute painful stimulus. Measures of pain tolerance, state anxiety, body awareness, and salivary cortisol were investigated. Results indicated no significant differences between physical activity groups for pain tolerance, stress responses (i.e., self-reported state anxiety and cortisol levels), or body awareness. Though, those who indicated using a disassociation coping technique during the exit interview tolerated the acute, surface pain longer. More research is required to further understand the effects of physical activity and coping strategies on pain perception and psychophysiological responses.
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The Effect of Season Performance on Male and Female Track and Field Athletes’ Self-identity

The Effect of Season Performance on Male and Female Track and Field Athletes’ Self-identity

Date: August 2013
Creator: Bradstreet, Tyler C.
Description: Although the “self” has generally been conceptualized as relatively stable in sport-specific research, events such as deselection, injury, and career termination have been found to negatively affect athletes’ levels of identification with the athlete role. Additionally, there has been limited research regarding competitive failure and its ability to negatively affect athletes’ levels of identification with the athlete role. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide additional evidence regarding the influence poor competitive seasons have on the malleability of athletes’ self-identity. Athletes were followed throughout the course of their season to determine whether athletes who encountered a poor competitive season reported lowered levels of athletic identity. Specifically, male and female NCAA Division I track and field athletes completed pre-indoor, post-indoor, and post-outdoor assessments of athletic identity. Contrary to previous research, the current study’s results indicated no identifiable relationship between male and female athletes’ season performance satisfaction and their level of post-indoor and post-outdoor athletic identity. Thus, the greatest predictor of athletes’ post-season level of athletic identity was their pre-season level of athletic identity, regardless of season performance. Given these results, future research should assess self-esteem as well as other potential coping strategies athletes might use in order to gain ...
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Factors Related to Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines in College Students: a Social Cognitive Perspective

Factors Related to Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines in College Students: a Social Cognitive Perspective

Date: May 2014
Creator: Farren, Gene L.
Description: Engaging in regular physical activity is important for maintaining and improving health. Unfortunately, most college students fail to meet the recommendations for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity guidelines (PAGs). Psychosocial factors described within the social cognitive theory are related to the acquisition and retention of physical activity behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine the relations of gender, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and social support with college students meeting aerobic, muscle-strengthening and both PAGs. Participants (N = 396) completed online questionnaires assessing their physical activity behaviors, exercise self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and social support. Self-reported physical activity was classified as meeting / not meeting PAGs. Using gender, exercise self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and social support as predictors, separate logistic regressions were used to examine their relations with the three PAG classifications. Analyses revealed that being male and level of social support increased the odds of meeting muscle-strengthening PAGs, but students’ level of self-efficacy and outcome expectations increased the odds of meeting all three PAG classifications. These findings indicate that interventions designed to increase self-efficacy and outcome expectancy may be beneficial for increasing college students’ physical activity for meeting the PAGs. Promotion of muscle-strengthening activities targeted at young women is also ...
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The Effects of a Mental Training Program on Tennis Players’ Service Form and Consistency

The Effects of a Mental Training Program on Tennis Players’ Service Form and Consistency

Date: May 2014
Creator: Lauer, E. Earlynn
Description: The current study investigated whether combining a ten-week imagery training and video modeling intervention would improve the consistency and form of tennis serves, and to determine if differences in intervention effectiveness were based on skill level of the players. Sixty-one high school tennis players (Mage = 15.44, SD = .98) were separated into four groups; a control group and an experimental group which received the mental training program. Univariate analyses of covariance controlling for possible pre-test differences, gender, and years of tennis experience and a chi-squared analysis for responders to treatment showed no significant differences for the experimental group. Thus, the ten-week imagery training and video modeling intervention used in this study appeared to not influence tennis service form and consistency. There is a need for longitudinal studies of mental training techniques to determine whether these practices are effective for athletes of different sports and competitive levels.
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The Acute Hormonal Response to the Kettlebell Swing Exercise

The Acute Hormonal Response to the Kettlebell Swing Exercise

Date: December 2013
Creator: Budnar Jr., Ronald Gene
Description: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to a bout of kettlebell swing exercise. Ten healthy men (19-30 y, 23.6 ± 3.5 y, 174.6 ± 5.7 cm, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) who were engaged in resistance training at least twice per week but were inexperienced with kettlebell swings participated in this study. Participants were familiarized with the kettlebell swing exercise during an initial visit. During the subsequent experimental protocol visit, participants performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16-kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured at the end of every round of swings. Fasted blood samples were collected pre-exercise (PRE), immediately post (IP), 15 minutes post (P15), and 30 minutes post exercise (P30) and analyzed for total testosterone (T), growth hormone (GH), cortisol, and lactate concentrations. Participants completed a total of 227 ± 23 swings (average swings per round: 19 ± 2). HR and RPE increased significantly (P < 0.05) throughout the exercise protocol. Lactate concentrations were significantly increased at all post exercise time points compared to PRE. T was significantly increased at IP compared to PRE. GH was significantly increased at ...
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Reliability of an On-line System to Assess Physical Activity Behaviors in an Active Group of Kinesiology Undergraduate Students

Reliability of an On-line System to Assess Physical Activity Behaviors in an Active Group of Kinesiology Undergraduate Students

Date: August 2013
Creator: Knell, Gregory
Description: Engaging in muscle strengthening activities (MSA) as part of a physical activity program offers health benefits. Although the merits of physical activity are well documented, many adults fail to meet appropriate levels as recommended in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAGA). To get a more complete understanding on an individual's physical activity behaviors, the Tracking Resistance Exercise and Strength Training (TREST) internet based survey was developed. The purpose of the current study was to determine the test-retest reliability of TREST items. Additionally, the prevalence of participants meeting the 2008 PAGA was reported by gender. The survey was completed approximately two weeks apart by 224 (52% male) undergraduate kinesiology students. Analysis of the survey items presented TREST as a reliable instrument in assessing an individual's physical activity behavior with a focus on MSA. Among the convenience sample of 445 participants (56% male) that completed the survey in assessment #1, 73% met the 2008 PAGA minimum recommendations for MSA (>=2 days/week) and aerobic activity (>= 150 min MVPA). A more complete MSA and MVPA criteria was established (requiring MSA of all seven major muscle groups) and only 32% of participants met this guideline. In general, men engaged in aerobic exercise ...
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Effects of Music on Vividness of Movement Imagery

Effects of Music on Vividness of Movement Imagery

Date: December 1994
Creator: Tham, Edgar Kok Kuan
Description: The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effects of music on self reported vividness of movement imagery. Eighty-four undergraduate kinesiology majors (42 males; 42 females) were subjects. Based on identical perceptions of precategorized music (classical and jazz), selected subjects were randomly assigned to one of three music treatment conditions (sedative, stimulative, and control) and administered the Vividness of Movement Imagery Questionnaire. A 3 x 2 x 2 (Treatment x Gender x Perspective) ANOVA with repeated measures on the last factor was employed. The results revealed that the two music conditions significantly enhanced the vividness of internal and external imagery perspectives when compared to the no music condition, and that music facilitated the vividness of males and females equally.
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Factors that Influence Men to Coach Women's NCAA Division II Basketball

Factors that Influence Men to Coach Women's NCAA Division II Basketball

Date: August 1997
Creator: Jackson, James Calvin
Description: This study identified factors that influenced men to coach women's basketball. The CCFQ, designed to determine relative importance of each of nine factors in career selection, was completed by 78 male head coaches of women's NCAA II basketball. Data was analyzed using univariate analysis with repeated measures, t-tests, and ANOVA. These coaches indicated fulfill need for competition, help female athletes reach full potential, and serve as role model as significant influences. Moderate influences included personal attributes of athletes, job attributes, and career advancement. Job availability, belief in own success, and income were not considered influential in career selection. Few differences were indicated between demographic sub-groups on any factor. Factors associated with well being of athletes had the greatest influence.
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Responses During Exercise at 90% and 100% of the Running Velocity Associated with VO2max (vVO2max)

Responses During Exercise at 90% and 100% of the Running Velocity Associated with VO2max (vVO2max)

Date: August 1995
Creator: Burt, Shane E. (Shane Eugen)
Description: Six male long-distance runners participated in this study to evaluate the responses to exercise at 90% and 100% vV02max. Subjects participated in five maximal exercise tests: one incremental, three tests at 90% vV02max, and one test at 100% vV02max. The results of this study demonstrate that V02max can be elicited in a constant-velocity test at 90% vV02max.
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Do American Adults Know How to Exercise for a Health Benefit?

Do American Adults Know How to Exercise for a Health Benefit?

Date: December 1998
Creator: Krzewinski-Malone, Jeanette A. (Jeanette Aileen)
Description: Approximately 950,000 Americans die annually from cardiovascular disease. Physical activity is a major risk factor for the development of CVD and a risk factor for stroke. The purpose of this research was to determine whether American adults know how to exercise to achieve health benefits and whether this knowledge is a function of demographics. Items included knowledge of exercise guidelines and knowledge of traditional and non-traditional exercise activities. This information was obtained from 22 questions that were a part of a larger national survey of 2,002 American households. Statistical analyses of this sample, indicate American adults have knowledge which varies by demographic groups. Data revealed that overall the 61+, Less than High School, African-American, Hispanic-American, and Male groups have the least amount of knowledge about exercise. These data can provide health educators with important aspects of exercise knowledge for future health promotions/interventions.
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The Significance of Time to Exhaustion at the Velocity at VO2Max

The Significance of Time to Exhaustion at the Velocity at VO2Max

Date: May 1998
Creator: Ehler, Karen
Description: There were two primary goals in this investigation. The first goal was to determine if inter-individual variability in time to exhaustion at the velocity associated with V02max (Tlim at Vmax) was explained by anaerobic capacity (AC), Vmax, anaerobic threshold (AT), and/or a combination variable in the form [AC • (Vmax - vAT)^-1]. The second goal was to determine if AC could be predicted from Tlim at Vmax, AT, and/or a combination variable in the form [Tlim • (Vmax - vAT)].
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Muscular Differences Between Female Power and Endurance Athletes

Muscular Differences Between Female Power and Endurance Athletes

Date: August 1997
Creator: Akers, Allen (Roy Allen)
Description: The purpose of this study was to compare the torque generating capabilities and fatigue responses of female power athletes, female endurance athletes, and age-matched female non-athletic controls.
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Temporal Specificity in Exercise Training

Temporal Specificity in Exercise Training

Date: May 1995
Creator: Leiferman, Jennifer A.
Description: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of training at a particular time of day on anaerobic capacity in the morning and in the afternoon.
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Measurement of Mood State Changes Throughout a Competitive Volleyball Season

Measurement of Mood State Changes Throughout a Competitive Volleyball Season

Date: May 1995
Creator: Schultes, Bruce A. (Bruce Anthony)
Description: Mood state changes have been assessed in endurance sport athletes such as swimmers, distance runners and rowers. However, much less is known about the psychological changes that occur in team sport athletes. The purpose of this study was to assess mood state changes of intercollegiate female volleyball players across a competitive season.
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Effects of Maternal Aerobic Exercise on Selected Pregnancy Outcomes in Nulliparas

Effects of Maternal Aerobic Exercise on Selected Pregnancy Outcomes in Nulliparas

Date: August 1997
Creator: Melgar, Dian L. (Dian Louise)
Description: This study evaluated the effects of participation in aerobic exercise on pregnancy outcomes. Pregnancy outcomes included type of delivery, length of labor, gestational age, neonatal birth weight, and maternal weight gain. The 137 nulliparas were categorized as active (N=44) or sedentary (N=93) based on self-reported aerobic exercise. Findings from this study suggest that pregnant women who were active during pregnancy were more likely to have vaginal deliveries than sedentary women. No significant differences between active and sedentary women were found in neonatal birth weight, maternal weight gain, length of labor, or gestational age.
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Effects of Endurance Intensity and Rest Interval on Subsequent Strength Performance

Effects of Endurance Intensity and Rest Interval on Subsequent Strength Performance

Date: May 1996
Creator: Books, Gregory D. (Gregory Douglas)
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of cycling exercise at different intensities and rest intervals on strength performance. Ten males, engaged in concurrent training for at least one month prior to testing, comprised the subject group for this study. Results show only leg press torque and leg press work to be decreased after cardiorespiratory exercise of moderate intensity. Leg extension average power, chest press torque, chest press power, and chest press work after cycling were not decreased from pre-exercise values. No significant effects were found for exercise intensity, testing times, or intensity by testing times. These results indicate that lower body strength is decreased by cycling and that one hour is not sufficient to restore leg strength.
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The Effect of Running Speed on VO2 Kinetics in the Severe Exercise Domain

The Effect of Running Speed on VO2 Kinetics in the Severe Exercise Domain

Date: December 1997
Creator: Williams, Christine Suzanne
Description: There has been an interest in the kinetics of the V02 response during exercise at various intensities. However, most studies focus on the response of submaximal intensities whereas few studies have examined V02 kinetics at severe intensities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exercise intensity on V02 kinetics over a range of severe intensities.
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The Effects of Video-Computerized Feedback on Competitive State Anxiety, Self-Efficacy, Effort, and Baseball Hitting-Task Performance

The Effects of Video-Computerized Feedback on Competitive State Anxiety, Self-Efficacy, Effort, and Baseball Hitting-Task Performance

Date: December 1998
Creator: Leslie, P. Jason
Description: This study examined the effects of frame-by-frame video-computerized feedback on competitive state anxiety, self-efficacy, effort, and baseball performance of high school players. Players were randomly assigned to one of three feedback conditions: (a) Hitting score, (b) Hitting score and frame-by-frame analysis of a mechanically correct swing, (c) Hitting score and frame-by-frame analysis of participant's swing and a mechanically correct swing. Once per week for six weeks, the players completed three questionnaires: (a) Hitting Self-Efficacy Scale, (b) Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2C, and (c) Performance Effort Scale, and performed a hitting task. Results of the 3 (Group) x 6 (Trials) ANOVAs revealed no significant effects. This study does not support previous confidence-baseball hitting research.
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Critical Power as a Predictor of Performance in a Bicycle Time Trial

Critical Power as a Predictor of Performance in a Bicycle Time Trial

Date: December 1994
Creator: Dangelmaier, Brian (Brian S.)
Description: Certain measures of aerobic power have been shown to have a high relationship with endurance performance. Critical power (CP) has also been shown to be well correlated to endurance performance, but few studies have evaluated its use in a competitive scenario. In this study, cardiorespiratory-metabolic measures were evaluated in 13 highly trained cyclists to determine their relationship to performance in a 17 km time trial. Critical power, determined from the nonlinear power-time model, was also evaluated to determine its relationship to performance in a 17 km time trial. Results indicate that the traditional indicators of V02max and ventilatory anaerobic threshold were well correlated to TT performance (r=-0.86, r=-0.79, respectively). The principal finding from this study was that performance in a bicycle time trial is related to CP at least as well as to cardiorespirator-ymetabolic measures. In fact, the results fromthis study suggest that the relationship between performance and CP is stronger (r=-0.89). Use of the critical power concept is attractive because testing requires only a cycle ergometer and a stopwatch to estimate a parameter of aerobic fitness.
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Students' and Teachers' Perspective of Purposes for Engaging in Physical Activity

Students' and Teachers' Perspective of Purposes for Engaging in Physical Activity

Date: August 1994
Creator: Thomason, Jonathan E.
Description: Purposes for engaging in physical activities were examined from the perspective of university students enrolled in physical activity classes and kinesiology faculty. Data was collected from 473 students and 20 faculty members. Both groups completed the Personal Purposes and Meanings in Movement Inventory (PPMMI). Independent t-tests were conducted for each of the twenty-two purpose statements to determine differences between faculty and students in the rating of purposes. Students attending individual sport activity classes rated self-knowledge, transcendence, object projection/reception, awareness, competition, neuromuscular efficiency, movement appreciation, and muscular strength significantly lower (p<.01) than the faculty. Students attending team sport activities rated self-knowledge, transcendence, participation, object projection/reception, teamwork, awareness, competition, leadership, and expression significantly (pc.01) lower than the faculty. Students attending fitness activity classes rated self-knowledge, competition, leadership, transcendence, participation, teamwork, circulo-respiratory efficiency, and personal integration significantly (p<.01) lower than faculty.
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