You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Sociology
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Racial Stereotypes and Racial Assimilation in a Multiracial Society

Racial Stereotypes and Racial Assimilation in a Multiracial Society

Date: December 2009
Creator: Youngblood, Thomas
Description: Interest in a multiracial society has increased in recent years and including on racism and prejudice and in the propensity to stereotype out-groups. Theories on racism help explain the dominant group's prejudice toward subordinate groups. Yet they only explain why dominant group members stereotype subordinates or if the dominant group's propensity to stereotype is different from that of subordinate groups. Recent assimilation theories suggest that some minorities are assimilating with Whites but Blacks are not undergoing assimilation. Classic assimilation theory suggests that when a subordinate group assimilates with the dominant group then they will also take on the dominant group's values and beliefs, including their prejudices and propensities to stereotype. The use of racial stereotypes in support of the assimilation of a minority group has not been tested. Results from the LSAF national survey provide support for Asians to be assimilating with Whites. However, Hispanics do not appear to be taking on Whites' propensity to stereotype, contradicting the prediction that Hispanics are assimilating with Whites.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Health status and access disparities among the uninsured working-age population in a safety-net healthcare network in Tarrant County, Texas.

Health status and access disparities among the uninsured working-age population in a safety-net healthcare network in Tarrant County, Texas.

Date: December 2009
Creator: Queen, Courtney M.
Description: The objective of this research was to determine if healthcare access disparities exist across race and gender in a publically funded safety-net healthcare system in Texas. Data were examined from a representative random sample of 1468 adults aged 18-64 who were patients in this safety-net system in July and August of 2000 and were analyzed using binary logistic regression and chi-square measures of significance. Major Findings: On measures of health status - overall health rating (p =.051), limited employment (p =.000), energy level (p =.001), and worry (p =.012) - Anglos reported the worst health; Mexican Americans, the best health; with African Americans intermediate. Mexican Americans were more likely to have never had health insurance, and to also have had insurance in the past year; Anglos were least likely to have ever had insurance (p =.015) or to have had insurance in the past year (p =.000). On use of EDs (p =.028), problems getting prescription medicines (p =.029), and foregoing other necessities of life to pay for healthcare, Mexican Americans were least disadvantaged with African Americans reporting greatest use of EDs among both men and women, and Anglos the most problems with prescription medicines and foregoing care, especially among ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The effect of social support on risky sexual behavior in homeless adolescent youth.

The effect of social support on risky sexual behavior in homeless adolescent youth.

Date: December 2009
Creator: Ford, Alison Nicole
Description: This study examines the relationship between social support and youth's high-risk behaviors. The data were obtained from the Midwest Homeless and Runaway Adolescent Project (MHRAP) in 1996. In the Midwestern United States, this study examines the hypothesis that youth with high social support will have low sexual risk behaviors. The study found that youths who had someone to turn to, a greater number of close friends, and someone they could count on were less likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors. The implications of the findings are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Impact of Legal Sanctions on Recidivism Rates among Male Perpetrators of Domestic Violence

The Impact of Legal Sanctions on Recidivism Rates among Male Perpetrators of Domestic Violence

Date: December 2009
Creator: Cosimo, S. Deborah
Description: Using a Cox proportional hazards regression model, this dissertation explores three factors currently not addressed in the literature on men who batter women and who are court ordered to participate in a battering intervention program. These factors are the cumulative effects of civil and criminal legal sanctions (dose-response of sanctions) for domestic violence related offenses on recidivism, reduced opportunities to recidivate, and whether the number of legal sanctions imposed has an effect on how long a man maintains his non-recidivism status. Because one domestic violence case may involve multiple sanctions, this study uses the Legal Sanction Dose-Response Index to gauge the cumulative impact of civil and criminal sanctions upon recidivism of domestic violence. The Cox proportional hazards model indicates that the risk of recidivism is 45% lower for men who experienced two legal sanctions (typically arrest and probation) in response to the index case, relative to men who experienced one legal sanction (typically civil protective order). In other words, those with two legal sanctions are able to maintain their non-recidivism status longer relative to those with one sanction. Men with prior criminal court involvement for domestic violence related offenses are more likely to recidivate. Additionally, rather than incarceration reducing opportunities ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Gender and Juvenile Case Processing: A Look at Texas

Gender and Juvenile Case Processing: A Look at Texas

Date: August 2009
Creator: Johnson, Dustin Paul
Description: This dissertation examines the role gender plays in predicting referral beyond juvenile court intake. Using referral data from Texas for 1999-2003, multinomial logistic regression is used to examine case processing decisions. Males were found to be more likely than females to be processed beyond intake for both status and delinquent offenses. Legal variables were found to influence processing decisions for delinquent offenses more than non-legal variables. In contrast, non-legal variables were found to influence processing decisions more than legal variables for status offenses. Finally, overall, minority females were not found to be more likely to be processed beyond intake than white females. Further research is needed to determine if the same finding is true for males.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Income Inequality and Racial/Ethnic Infant Mortality in the United States

Income Inequality and Racial/Ethnic Infant Mortality in the United States

Date: December 2008
Creator: Jesmin, Syeda Sarah
Description: The objective of this study was to examine if intra-racial income inequality contributes to higher infant mortality rates (IMRs) for African-Americans. The conceptual framework for this study is derived from Richard Wilkinson's psychosocial environment interpretation of the income inequality and health link. The hypotheses examined were that race/ethnicity-specific IMRs are influenced by intra-race/ethnicity income inequality, and that these effects of income inequality on health are mediated by level of social mistrust and/or risk profile of the mother. Using state-level data from several sources, the 2000 National Center for Health Statistics Linked Birth Infant Death database, 2000 U.S. Census, and 2000 General Social Survey, a number of regression equations were estimated. Results indicated that the level of intra-racial/ethnic income inequality is a significant predictor of non-Hispanic Black IMRs, but not the IMRs of non-Hispanic Whites or Hispanics. Additionally, among Blacks, the effect of their intra-racial income inequality on their IMRs was found to be mediated by the risk profile of the mother, namely, the increased likelihood of smoking and/or drinking and/or less prenatal care by Black women during pregnancy. Implications of the findings are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Television viewing habits of Christians.

Television viewing habits of Christians.

Date: December 2008
Creator: Dutke, Linda Jean
Description: This dissertation examines possible differences in media habits and tastes between Christians and non-Christians. The study utilizes data from singles Internet personal advertisements to determine whether or not Christians, especially those with high levels of religiosity or who may be part of the Christian Right, have different television viewing patterns. Three models were developed using multivariate data analysis and logistic regression to examine Christians' television viewing habits regarding reality shows, soap operas, and news. The first model looks at the viewing habits of Christians, the second model examines the viewing habits of Christians attending religious services at least monthly, and the third model analyzes the viewing habits of Christians attending religious services at least monthly and having conservative political views. No significant differences were found in viewing habits between Christians and non-Christians for any of the three models. Although the results of this study cannot be generalized to Christians as a whole, they suggest that Christians in this sample might have adopted secular practices with regard to their television viewing habits.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Social (Dis)organization and Terror related Crimes in Turkey

Social (Dis)organization and Terror related Crimes in Turkey

Date: December 2008
Creator: Başıbüyük, Oğuzhan
Description: The primary focus of this study is to explore the relationship between structural factors of a specific society and occurrence of terror related crimes. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to examine how or to what extent social disorganization theory, which is the basic theoretical foundation of this study, can explain terrorism related crimes in Turkey. Although several previous studies investigated the social and structural dimensions of terrorism in a country, many of those studies did not go beyond investigating the impacts of traditional structural factors such as poverty, inequality, and education on terrorism. This study goes a step further by adding the mediating factors between those primary social disorganization variables and terror related crimes. Direct, indirect and, total effects of structural variables on terrorism through the mediating variables, that is prevalence of voluntary associations and religious institutions, are examined. Findings obtained from multivariate and mediation analyses show that while some structural variables such as education and poverty are directly related to distribution of terror related crimes, this relationship became indirect through the mediating variables for other structural variables such as residential mobility and unemployment. Results suggest that rather than overreliance on traditional antiterrorism strategies which are mostly depending ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Analysis of the Opinions of University Students about the Current Situation of the Headscarf Dispute in Turkey

An Analysis of the Opinions of University Students about the Current Situation of the Headscarf Dispute in Turkey

Date: December 2008
Creator: Aydemir, Dilek
Description: This study examined the opinions of university students about the current situation of the headscarf dispute on the wearing of headscarves in Turkey. The influence of gender, the level of secularism, socioeconomic status and encounter with women wearing headscarves on opinions about the wearing of headscarves were analyzed in this study. The sample of this study was composed of 400 university students among whom there were 240 female and 160 male students. Moreover, the sample comprised university students from 50 universities from Turkey. The results indicated that the level of secularism and encounter with women wearing headscarves were distinguished as two determining factors of the diverse opinions of the university students on the topic. No association was found between the perceptions of university students about the issue and the independent variables of gender and socioeconomic status.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Retiring in a Foreign Land: Health Care Issues of US Retirees in Mexico

Retiring in a Foreign Land: Health Care Issues of US Retirees in Mexico

Date: December 2008
Creator: Amin, Iftekhar
Description: This research examined the health care related issues of the American seniors retiring in Mexico. Data for this study were collected through in-person questionnaire surveys and case studies. Findings of this study indicate that US seniors retiring in Mexico are predominantly non-Hispanic whites, married, and more likely to be college graduates. This study challenges the general perception that US seniors move to foreign countries is "amenity-led." The case studies clearly show that many US seniors move there because they are afraid that with reduced income and increased health care needs they would not be able to maintain the same lifestyle after retirement in the US. Climate and the slower pace of life are two other big attractions for seniors' to move to Mexico. A major finding of this study is age, gender, education, use of Medicare for medical care coverage, and chronic medical condition are significant predictors of US seniors' health behavior and health outcomes in Mexico. The policy implications of the findings have been discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST