You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Country: Vietnam
Capability and cost assessment of the major forest nations to measure and monitor their forest carbon

Capability and cost assessment of the major forest nations to measure and monitor their forest carbon

Date: April 7, 2008
Creator: Harcastle, P. D.; Baird, David & Harden, Virginia
Description: According to the Executive Summary, the aims and objective of this report are to provide an assessment of national capacity and capability in 25 tropical countries for measuring and monitoring forest as a requirement for reporting on REDD under IPCC guidelines. This paper was commissioned by the United Kingdom Office of Climate Change as background work to its report 'Climate Change: Financing Global Forests' (the Eliasch Review).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Winds of Change: East Asia's Sustainable Energy Future

Winds of Change: East Asia's Sustainable Energy Future

Date: May 2010
Creator: World Bank
Description: This report outlines the strategic direction of the energy sector to meet its growing energy demand in an environmentally-sustainable manner over the next two decades, and presents a pathway of policy frameworks and financing mechanisms to get there. This study found that large-scale deployment of energy efficiency and low-carbon technologies can simultaneously stabilize East Asia’s CO2 emissions by 2025 and significantly improve the local environment and enhance energy security, without compromising economic growth.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Renewables 2010: Global Status Report

Renewables 2010: Global Status Report

Date: 2010
Creator: Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century
Description: This report describes economic trends in building the capacity of renewable energy in several countries.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
UNEP Year Book 2009: New Science in Our Changing Environment

UNEP Year Book 2009: New Science in Our Changing Environment

Date: 2009
Creator: unknown
Description: This publication provides an overview of global and regional environmental issues policy decisions during 2009.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Strategic Environmental Assessment and Adaptation to Climate Change

Strategic Environmental Assessment and Adaptation to Climate Change

Date: October 2008
Creator: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Description: This is one in a series of Advisory Notes that supplement the OECD/DAC Good Practice Guidance on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) (OECD/DAC 2006). The focus of this Advisory Note is to show how Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) approaches can help mainstream adaptation to climate change into strategic planning. It is used to integrate considerations related to climate change into national development or sectoral management planning or policymaking processes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Global Trends in Sustainable Energy Investment 2010: Analysis of Trends and Issues in the Finacning

Global Trends in Sustainable Energy Investment 2010: Analysis of Trends and Issues in the Finacning

Date: 2010
Creator: United Nations Environment Programme
Description: This report shows that in spite of the global economic downturn, investment in sustainable energy is still strong.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Our Planet , May 2010: Biodiversity, Our Life

Our Planet , May 2010: Biodiversity, Our Life

Date: May 2010
Creator: Lean, Geoffrey
Description: Our Planet is a periodical magazine published by the United Nations Environment Programme. This issue is devoted to the economic importance of biodiversity and how protecting or restoring habitats can significantly reduce the costs in a variety of industries and infrastructures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Tunza: The UNEP Magazine for Youth, Volume 6, Number 2, 2008

Tunza: The UNEP Magazine for Youth, Volume 6, Number 2, 2008

Date: 2008
Creator: Lean, Geoffrey
Description: Tunza is a UNEP magazine for and by young people. This issue is devoted to sustainable food production and consumption.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Dead Planet, Living Planet: Biodiversity and Ecosystem Restoration for Sustainable Development

Dead Planet, Living Planet: Biodiversity and Ecosystem Restoration for Sustainable Development

Date: 2010
Creator: Nelleman, Christian & Corcoran, Emily
Description: This report discusses some vital services that natural ecosystems contribute to human health and development.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Power of One: Bonnie Singleton and American Prisoners of War in Vietnam

The Power of One: Bonnie Singleton and American Prisoners of War in Vietnam

Date: August 1999
Creator: Garrett, Dave L.
Description: Bonnie Singleton, wife of United States Air Force helicopter rescue pilot Jerry Singleton, saw her world turned upside down when her husband was shot down while making a rescue in North Vietnam in 1965. At first, the United States government advised her to say very little publicly concerning her husband, and she complied. After the capture of the American spy ship, the U.S.S. Pueblo by North Korea, and the apparent success in freeing the naval prisoners when Mrs. Rose Bucher, the ship captain's wife, spoke out, Mrs. Singleton changed her opinion and embarked upon a campaign to raise public awareness about American prisoners of war held by the Communist forces in Southeast Asia. Mrs. Singleton, along with other Dallas-area family members, formed local grass-roots organizations to notify people around the world about the plight of American POWs. They enlisted the aid of influential congressmen, such as Olin "Tiger" Teague of College Station, Texas; President Richard M. Nixon and his administration; millionaire Dallas businessman Ross Perot; WFAA television in Dallas; and other news media outlets worldwide. In time, Bonnie Singleton, other family members, and the focus groups they helped start encouraged North Vietnam to release the names of prisoners, allow mail ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Three Days and Two Nights

Three Days and Two Nights

Date: August 1978
Creator: Lewis, Jay B.
Description: This novel of the Vietnam War examines the effects of prolonged stress on individuals and groups. The narrative, which is told from the points of view of four widely different characters, follows an infantry company through three days and two nights of combat on a small island off the coast of the northern I Corps military region. The story's principal themes are the loss of communication that contributes to and is caused by the background of chaos that arises from combat; the effect of brutal warfare on the individual spirit; and the way groups reorganize themselves to cope with the confusion of the battlefield. The thesis includes an explication of the novel, explaining some of the technical details of its production.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: November 2015
Creator: Van Straten, Jim
Description: Assigned as the senior medical advisor to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam in I Corps, an area close to the DMZ, James G. Van Straten traveled extensively and interacted with military officers and non-commissioned officers, peasant-class farmers, Buddhist bonzes, shopkeepers, scribes, physicians, nurses, the mentally ill, and even political operatives. He sent his wife daily letters from July 1966 through June 1967, describing in impressive detail his experiences, and those letters became the primary source for his memoir. The author is grateful that his wife retained all the letters he wrote to her and their children during the year they were apart. The author describes with great clarity and poignancy the anguish among the survivors when an American cargo plane in bad weather lands short of the Da Nang Air Base runway on Christmas Eve and crashes into a Vietnamese coastal village, killing more than 100 people and destroying their village; the heart-wrenching pleadings of a teenage girl that her shrapnel-ravaged leg not be amputated; and the anger of an American helicopter pilot who made repeated trips into a hot landing zone to evacuate the wounded, only to have the Vietnamese insist that the dead be given a ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: July 2015
Creator: Brusilow, Anshel & Underdahl, Robin
Description: Anshel Brusilow was born in 1928 and raised in Philadelphia by musical Russian Jewish parents in a neighborhood where practicing your instrument was as normal as hanging out the laundry. By the time he was sixteen, he was appearing as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra. He also met Pierre Monteux at sixteen, when Monteux accepted him into his summer conducting school. Under George Szell, Brusilow was associate concertmaster at the Cleveland Orchestra until Ormandy snatched him away to make him concertmaster in Philadelphia, where he remained from 1959 to 1966. Ormandy and Brusilow had a father-son relationship, but Brusilow could not resist conducting, to Ormandy's great displeasure. By the time he was forty, Brusilow had sold his violin and formed his own chamber orchestra in Philadelphia with more than a hundred performances per year. For three years he was conductor of the Dallas Symphony, until he went on to shape the orchestral programs at Southern Methodist University and the University of North Texas. Brusilow played with or conducted many top-tier classical musicians, and he has opinions about each and every one. He also made many recordings. Co-written with Robin Underdahl, his memoir is a fascinating and unique view of American ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Combat Chaplain: A Thirty-Year Vietnam Battle

Combat Chaplain: A Thirty-Year Vietnam Battle

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 2001
Creator: Johnson, James D.
Description: Chaplain James D. Johnson broke all the rules to be with his men. He chose to accompany them, unarmed, on their daily combat operations, a decision made against the recommendations of his superiors. During what would be the final days for some, he offered his ministry not from a pulpit but on the battlefields--in hot landing zones and rice paddies, in hospitals, aboard ship, and knee-deep in mud. He even found time for baptisms in the muddy Mekong River. "You've never really lived until you've almost died," writes Johnson, one of the youngest army chaplains at the time. Through his compelling narration, he takes us into the hearts of frightened young boys and the minds of experienced men. In Combat Chaplain, we live for eight and one-half months with Johnson as he serves in the field with a small unit numbering 350 men. The physical price can be counted with numbers--ninety-six killed and over nine hundred wounded. Only those who paid it can understand the spiritual and psychological price, in a war that raised many difficult moral issues. "It placed my soul in the lost and found department for awhile," Johnson writes. Also provided here is an in-depth look at ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Storming the City: U.S. Military Performance in Urban Warfare from World War II to Vietnam

Storming the City: U.S. Military Performance in Urban Warfare from World War II to Vietnam

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: October 2015
Creator: Wahlman, Alec
Description: In an increasingly urbanized world, urban terrain has become a greater factor in military operations. Simultaneously, advances in military technology have given military forces sharply increased capabilities. The conflict comes from how urban terrain can negate or degrade many of those increased capabilities. What happens when advanced weapons are used in a close-range urban fight with an abundance of cover? Storming the City explores these issues by analyzing the performance of the US Army and US Marine Corps in urban combat in four major urban battles of the mid-twentieth century (Aachen 1944, Manila 1945, Seoul 1950, and Hue 1968). Alec Wahlman assesses each battle using a similar framework of capability categories, and separate chapters address urban warfare in American military thought. In the four battles, across a wide range of conditions, American forces were ultimately successful in capturing each city because of two factors: transferable competence and battlefield adaptation. The preparations US forces made for warfare writ large proved generally applicable to urban warfare. Battlefield adaptation, a strong suit of American forces, filled in where those overall preparations for combat needed fine tuning. From World War Two to Vietnam, however, there was a gradual reduction in tactical performance in the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries