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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Linguistics and Technical Communication
 Decade: 2010-2019
 Degree Discipline: English as a Second Language
Does the Provision of an Intensive and Highly Focused Indirect Corrective Feedback Lead to Accuracy?

Does the Provision of an Intensive and Highly Focused Indirect Corrective Feedback Lead to Accuracy?

Date: May 2010
Creator: Jhowry, Kheerani
Description: This thesis imparts the outcomes of a seven-week long quasi-experimental study that explored whether or not L2 learners who received intensive and highly focused indirect feedback on one type of treatable error - either the third person singular -s, plural endings -s, or definite article the - eventually become more accurate in the post-test as compared to a control group that did not. The paired-samples t-test comparing the pre-test and post-test scores of both groups demonstrates that the experimental group did no better than the control group after they received indirect corrective feedback. The independent samples t-test measuring the experimental and control group's accuracy shows no significant difference between the two groups. Effect sizes calculated, however, do indicate that, had the sample sizes been bigger, both groups would have eventually become more accurate in the errors targeted, although this would not have been because of the indirect feedback.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
NNS Use of Adverbs in Academic Writing

NNS Use of Adverbs in Academic Writing

Date: August 2011
Creator: Heidler, Linda E.
Description: Recent studies have begun to redefine the idea of accuracy in second language acquisition to include not only grammatical correctness, but also native-like selection. This is an exploratory study aimed at identifying areas of nonnative-like selection of adverbs, such as sentence position, semantic category preferences, frequency of use and breadth of word choice. Using corpus-linguistic methods it compares the writing of nonnative English speakers at an intermediate and advanced level to both American college students’ writing and published academic writing. It also conducts in-depth case studies of three of the most commonly used adverbs. It finds that while advanced students are grammatically accurate, there are still several ways in which their use of adverbs differs from that of native speakers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries