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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Behavior Analysis
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Year: 2001
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The effects of a conflicting instruction on a FR 5 performance

The effects of a conflicting instruction on a FR 5 performance

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Koremura, Yuka
Description: The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of a conflicting instruction on FR-5 performances by an ABABC design. After all four college students were consistently pressing 1-5-3 followed by sound-clips, the schedule value changed to FR-5 (A). Then they were presented with the written instruction "Press 426" (B) in addition to the previous condition. In the last condition (C), 1-5-3 responses were then scheduled for extinction in three participants and the reinforcer was changed from sound-clips to points for one participant. The results showed that unlike previous experiments, instructions did not override the scheduled contingencies. Instruction-following occurred only when there were no other contingencies (i.e., extinction of 1-5-3) or the scheduled reinforcer for FR-5 performances was weak.
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The Effects of Cumulative Consumption Feedback On Demand For Money As A Commodity

The Effects of Cumulative Consumption Feedback On Demand For Money As A Commodity

Date: May 2001
Creator: Bailey, Kathleen
Description: Behavioral economic theory describes a relation between response requirement and magnitude of reinforcement, and combines these variables into one independent variable (unit price) affecting operant behavior. This study investigated the relative effects of cumulative feedback on consumption for money as a commodity. Subjects were exposed to ranges of unit prices with or without a cumulative feedback bar on the computer screen indicating monetary earnings. For all participants in this study, consumption of money was a decreasing function of unit prices and the results from the present study are consistent with the behavioral economic prediction that increasing the unit price of a commodity will decrease consumption of that commodity. Analyses of demand curves, elasticity coefficients and response rates suggested differences between Feedback and No Feedback groups, although these were small and not statistically significant. The small differences observed were consistent with a behavior strengthening effect of feedback.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The effects of graduated exposure, modeling, and contingent social attention on tolerance to skin care products with children who have autism.

The effects of graduated exposure, modeling, and contingent social attention on tolerance to skin care products with children who have autism.

Date: December 2001
Creator: South, Ellyn M.
Description: The effects of graduated exposure, modeling and contingent social attention on tolerance to skincare products were evaluated with two boys with autism who displayed tactile defensiveness. Upon each presentation step of skincare products the number of positive and negative responses and successful step completion were measured. Procedures included modeling, presenting graduated opportunities, and providing social attention for step completion. Step advancement occurred if a child engaged in a step independently, without excessive refusals. A changing criterion design and a multiple baseline were employed to evaluate effects of this treatment package. Children demonstrated more positive and fewer negative responses as they completed the graduated steps. Effects maintained in follow-up observations.
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The Effects of Hearsee/Say and Hearsee/Write on  Acquisition, Generalization and Retention.

The Effects of Hearsee/Say and Hearsee/Write on Acquisition, Generalization and Retention.

Date: May 2001
Creator: Zanatta, Laraine Theresa
Description: This study examines the effects of training in two yoked learning channels (hearsee/say and hearsee/write) on the acquisition, generalization and retention of learning. Four fifth-grade participants were taught the lower-case letters of the Greek alphabet. Twelve letters were taught in the hearsee/say channel and twelve letters taught in the hearsee/write channel for equal amounts of time. The see/say channel reached higher frequencies at the end of training and showed higher acquisition celerations than the see/write channel. However, the see/write channel showed higher accuracy and retention than the see/say channel. The see/write channel also showed greater generalization across learning channels including the see/say, think/say, think/write and see-name/draw-symbol.
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Identification of environmental determinants of behavior  disorders through functional analysis of precursor behaviors

Identification of environmental determinants of behavior disorders through functional analysis of precursor behaviors

Date: May 2001
Creator: Churchill, Robert
Description: Methods for the determining the functional properties of problem behaviors are necessary for the design of successful treatments. Many of the currently utilized methodologies are chosen based on their speed, ease of application or for the perceived risk-reduction they afford. However, when thoroughly analyzed many of these methods fall short of their intended purpose. The current study attempted to assess dangerous problem behavior through a functional assessment of functionally related precursor behaviors during analog sessions. Results indicate that for three participants, placing the reinforcing contingencies on these related precursor behaviors produced differentiated outcomes during the assessment. These outcomes matched the outcomes of assessments of the more dangerous problem behaviors.
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Immediate and subsequent effects of fixed-time food presentations on automatically maintained mouthing.

Immediate and subsequent effects of fixed-time food presentations on automatically maintained mouthing.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2001
Creator: Simmons, Jason N.
Description: Several studies have demonstrated that fixed-time (FT) schedules of stimulus delivery can function to reduce a variety of behaviors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and subsequent effects of FT food deliveries on mouthing. In Phase 1, a preference assessment showed that caramel popcorn, chocolate cookies and pretzels were highly preferred food items. Thus, providing the basis for use of food items during treatment. In Phase 2, a functional analysis showed that mouthing was a nonsocially maintained problem behavior. Phase 3 demonstrated the use of FT schedules of food deliveries as treatment for nonsocially maintained mouthing. Results indicated that FT schedules of food significantly reduced mouthing. In addition, levels of mouthing observed during post-FT observations were reliably lower than pre-FT observations. Treatment effects, operative mechanisms responsible for the treatment effects and the experimental arrangement used to investigate varying FT schedules are discussed.
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Improving Appointment Keeping at an Eye Care Clinic Using a Revised Process Package

Improving Appointment Keeping at an Eye Care Clinic Using a Revised Process Package

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Hodge, Victoria L.
Description: Missed appointments by patients are a major problem for health care professionals. To combat this issue, some optometrists use a pre-appointing system in which patients are scheduled for an annual exam a year after their initial visit. Prior to that subsequent appointment, clinic staff often try to contact the patient to confirm the appointment. This study examined baseline levels of appointment keeping, analyzed existing processes for pre-appointing patients, and introduced a revised process package to improve appointment keeping at an eye care clinic. This package included training, mailed postcard reminders and two phone call reminders. Results indicate appointment keeping by pre-appointed patients increased over baseline. The intervention was also shown to be cost-beneficial.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries