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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Year: 2000
 Degree Discipline: Communication Studies
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Effects of receiver locus of control and interaction involvement on the interpretation of service complaints

Effects of receiver locus of control and interaction involvement on the interpretation of service complaints

Date: May 2000
Creator: Reed, William
Description: This thesis examined how receivers who vary in Interaction Involvement and Locus of Control (LOC) might differ in their interpretations of service complaints. Locus of control was measured using Rotter's (1966) LOC scale, while Interaction Involvement was measured with Cegala's (1984) Interaction Involvement measure, including a separate assessment of the effects for each sub-scale. Individuals were assigned to four groups based on their Interaction Involvement and LOC scores. The groups were compared with one-another for differences in how complaints were interpreted. Four complaint categories and a corresponding scale were developed to measure these differences. The categories were Subject, Goal, Opportunity, and Accountability. Interaction Involvement was expected to affect how receivers interpret the subject and goal of a complaint, while LOC was predicted to affect understanding of the opportunity and accountability aspects. Two research questions explored possible relationships between the complaint categories and the independent variables for individuals within each group. The study's four hypotheses were not supported, although some evidence was found for a significant relationship between receiver Interaction Involvement and perceived complainant Opportunity, for External LOC individuals only.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
We've Only Just Begun: A Black Feminist Analysis of Eleanor Smeal's National Press Club Address

We've Only Just Begun: A Black Feminist Analysis of Eleanor Smeal's National Press Club Address

Date: August 2000
Creator: Tate, Tara L.
Description: The voices of black women have traditionally been excluded from rhetorical scholarship, both as a subject of study and as a methodological approach. Despite the little attention black feminist thought has received, black women have long been articulating the unique intersection of oppressions they face and have been developing critical epistemologies.This study analyzes the National Press Club address given by NOW President Eleanor Smeal utilizing a black feminist methodological approach. The study constructs a black feminist theory for the communication discipline and applies it to a discursive artifact from the women's liberation movement. The implications of the study include the introduction of a new methodological approach to the communication discipline that can expand the liberatory reach of its scholarship.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries