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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Counseling and Higher Education
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The relationship of racial identity, psychological adjustment, and social capital, and their effects on academic outcomes of Taiwanese aboriginal five-year junior college students.

The relationship of racial identity, psychological adjustment, and social capital, and their effects on academic outcomes of Taiwanese aboriginal five-year junior college students.

Date: May 2008
Creator: Lin, Chia Hsun
Description: The study was conducted during November and December 2006, and the participants were Taiwanese aboriginal students at five-year junior colleges in Taiwan. Five hundred students from twenty junior colleges were recruited, and completed data for 226 students were analyzed. The data were collected by scoring the responses on six instruments which measured Taiwanese aboriginal junior college students' potential social capital, racial identity development, academic outcome (expected grade) and their psychological adjustment (stress, social support, self-esteem, and academic engagement). The instruments were designed to gather information on the following: (a) potential social capital scale; (b) multigroup ethnic identity measure; (c) racial identity attitude scale; (d) perceived stress scales; (e) self-esteem scale; (f) social support scale; (g) academic engagement scale; (h) academic outcome (expected grade). This quantitative design used SPSS 12 to analyze the data. Independent t-tests, Pearson correlation coefficient, regression model, ANOVA, ANCOVA were applied in the study. Results from this study indicate racial identity affects academic outcome with the covariate of psychological adjustment. This finding contradicts previous research that racial identity cannot affect students' psychological adjustment and academic achievement in higher education. For social capital, the study provides encouraging evidence that social capital is directly, significantly correlated with academic outcomes ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
School based child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) with low income Black American parents: Effects on children's behaviors and parent-child relationship stress, a pilot study.

School based child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) with low income Black American parents: Effects on children's behaviors and parent-child relationship stress, a pilot study.

Date: May 2008
Creator: Sheely, Angela
Description: This study examined the effectiveness of training low income Black American parents in child parent relationship therapy (CPRT). In response to the cultural values and challenges faced by low income Black American parents, the CPRT manual was adapted slightly for use with parents for this study. In this quasi-experimental design, 14 parents were assigned to the experimental group and 13 parents were assigned to the no treatment control group. Six hypotheses were analyzed. Different analyses were conducted based on the hypotheses. A two-factor repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were conducted to determine if the CPRT treatment and the no treatment control group performed differently across time according to pretest and posttest results of the Child Behavior Checklist - Parent Version (CBCL) and the Parenting Stress Index (PSI). Additionally, partial η2 was calculated to determine practical significance. Five hypotheses were retained at the .025 level of significance. Findings indicated that parents who participated in the CPRT training reported a statistically significant decrease in parent-child relationship stress. Specifically, parents assigned to the experimental group demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in Child Domain (p < .001), Parent Domain (p < .001), and Total Stress (p < .001) of the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
School-based child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) with low income first generation immigrant Hispanic parents: Effects on child behavior and parent-child relationship stress.

School-based child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) with low income first generation immigrant Hispanic parents: Effects on child behavior and parent-child relationship stress.

Date: May 2008
Creator: Ceballos, Peggy
Description: This quasi-experimental study examined the effects of child-parent relationship therapy (CPRT) with low income first generation immigrant Hispanic parents. Forty-eight parents were randomly assigned by school site to the experimental group (n=24) and to the no treatment control group (n=24). A two factor (Time x Group) repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the effects of group membership (experimental, control) and time (pretest, posttest) on each of the six hypotheses. Dependent variables for the Spanish version of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) included Externalizing Problems, Internalizing Problems, and Total Problems. Dependent variables for the Spanish version of the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) included Child Domain, Parent Domain, and Total Stress. Results indicated that from pre-test to post-test, parents who participated in the CPRT treatment group reported a statistically significant improvement on their children's behaviors at the alpha .025 level (Internalizing Problems p< .001; Externalizing Problems p< .001; Total Problems p<.001) when compared to children whose parents did not participate in CPRT. Partial eta squared (ηp2) further indicated that the effects of CPRT treatment on the experimental group compared to the control group from pre-test to post-test was large (ηp2 = .56; ηp2 = .59; and ηp2 = .68, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Student Variables Contributing to Program Completion in Career School Sector For-Profit Schools

Student Variables Contributing to Program Completion in Career School Sector For-Profit Schools

Date: August 2008
Creator: Eatman, Timothy Allen
Description: The general purpose of the study was to compile current descriptive information for recent graduates from career school sector institutions that reveals the significant factors which contributed to their program completion. The research project focused upon career school program completers. The scope of the study was directed to recent program completers at two career schools in Texas which offer a cross-section of programs designed to provide students specific skills for immediate employment. Based upon an extensive review of literature and the input of a focus group of experienced career school administrators and faculty members, seven variables were determined to be worthy of a focused study of their possible contributions to career school program completion. The variables were ability to accept responsibility for completion, academic preparedness, family or friends support system, self-esteem, life skills preparedness, sense of being goal-oriented, and sense of connectedness to the school. It was determined that each of the seven variables existed prominently in the majority of these recent graduates. The researcher concludes that there is a tremendous need for continued study that is focused on career school sector students. The paper offers the suggestion of a specific retention program that can be employed by career school ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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