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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Chemistry
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
1-(4, 4'-Dinitrodiphenylmethyl)-Piperidines; 1-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-and 1-(4-Nitrobenzoyl)-Piperdines
This study experiments with the methods of 1-(4, 4'-Dinitrodiphenylmethyl)-Piperidines; 1-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-and 1-(4-Nitrobenzoyl)-Piperdines. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107844/
2-Dialkylaminoethyl Ketals of Benzophenone; the Attempted Synthesis of some Heterocyclic Sulfones
This thesis describes two experiments: one related to antihistamines, and the other related to antitubercular compounds. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83523/
α-(4-Aminophenylsulfonyl)-Acetophenone Derivatives; N-Diphenylmethyl and N-Fluorenyl Piperidines
This thesis is a study of α-(4-aminophenylsulfonyl)-acetophenone derivatives; n-diphenylmethyl and n-fluorenyl piperidines. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83593/
Accuracy and Efficiency in Computational Chemistry: The Correlation Consistent Composite Approach
One of the central concerns of computational chemistry is that of efficiency (i.e. the development of methodologies which will yield increased accuracy of prediction without requiring additional computational resources – RAM, disk space, computing time). Though the equations of quantum mechanics are known, the solutions to these equations often require a great deal of computing power. This dissertation primarily concerns the theme of improved computational efficiency (i.e. the achievement of greater accuracy with reduced computational cost). Improvements in the efficiency of computational chemistry are explored first in terms of the correlation consistent composite approach (ccCA). The ccCA methodology was modified and this enhanced ccCA methodology was tested against the diverse G3/05 set of 454 energetic properties. As computational efficiency improves, molecules of increasing size may be studied and this dissertation explored the issues (differential correlation and size extensivity effects) associated with obtaining chemically accurate (within 1 kcal mol-1) enthalpies of formation for hydrocarbon molecules of escalating size. Two applied projects are also described; these projects concerned the theoretical prediction of a novel rare gas compound, FKrOH, and the mechanism of human glutathione synthetase’s (hGS) negative cooperativity. The final work examined the prospect for the parameterization of the modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential using first principles calculations of dimer and trimer energies of nickel and carbon systems. This method of parameterization holds promise for increasing the accuracy of simulations for bulk properties within the field of materials science. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84300/
Addition Reactions of Some Aromatic Aldazines
The paper explores the conclusion that the addition compound was bicyclic, and that the addition of each of the two moles of cyanic acid was dependent upon the other. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163840/
Adherence/Diffusion Barrier Layers for Copper Metallization: Amorphous Carbon:Silicon Polymerized Films
Semiconductor circuitry feature miniaturization continues in response to Moore 's Law pushing the limits of aluminum and forcing the transition to Cu due to its lower resistivity and electromigration. Copper diffuses into silicon dioxide under thermal and electrical stresses, requiring the use of barriers to inhibit diffusion, adding to the insulator thickness and delay time, or replacement of SiO2 with new insulator materials that can inhibit diffusion while enabling Cu wetting. This study proposes modified amorphous silicon carbon hydrogen (a-Si:C:H) films as possible diffusion barriers and replacements for SiO2 between metal levels, interlevel dielectric (ILD), or between metal lines (IMD), based upon the diffusion inhibition of previous a-Si:C:H species expected lower dielectric constants, acceptable thermal conductivity. Vinyltrimethylsilane (VTMS) precursor was condensed on a titanium substrate at 90 K and bombarded with electron beams to induce crosslinking and form polymerized a-Si:C:H films. Modifications of the films with hydroxyl and nitrogen was accomplished by dosing the condensed VTMS with water or ammonia before electron bombardment producing a-Si:C:H/OH and a-Si:C:H/N and a-Si:C:H/OH/N polymerized films in expectation of developing films that would inhibit copper diffusion and promote Cu adherence, wetting, on the film surface. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to characterize Cu metallization of these a-Si:C:H films. XPS revealed substantial Cu wetting of a-Si:C:H/OH and a-Si:C:H/OH/N films and some wetting of a-Si:C:H/N films, and similar Cu diffusion inhibition to 800 K by all of the a-:S:C:H films. These findings suggest the possible use of a-Si:C:H films as ILD and IMD materials, with the possibility of further tailoring a-Si:C:H films to meet future device requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4493/
Adhesion/diffusion barrier layers for copper integration: carbon-silicon polymer films and tantalum substrates
The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has identified the integration of copper (Cu) with low-dielectric-constant (low-k) materials as a critical goal for future interconnect architectures. A fundamental understanding of the chemical interaction of Cu with various substrates, including diffusion barriers and adhesion promoters, is essential to achieve this goal. The objective of this research is to develop novel organic polymers as Cu/low-k interfacial layers and to investigate popular barrier candidates, such as clean and modified tantalum (Ta) substrates. Carbon-silicon (C-Si) polymeric films have been formed by electron beam bombardment or ultraviolet (UV) radiation of molecularly adsorbed vinyl silane precursors on metal substrates under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies show that polymerization is via the vinyl groups, while Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) results show that the polymerized films have compositions similar to the precursors. Films derived from vinyltrimethyl silane (VTMS) are adherent and stable on Ta substrates until 1100 K. Diffusion of deposited Cu overlayers is not observed below 800 K, with dewetting occurred only above 400 K. Hexafluorobenzene moieties can also be incorporated into the growing film with good thermal stability. Studies on the Ta substrates demonstrate that even sub-monolayer coverages of oxygen or carbide on polycrystalline Ta significantly degrade the strength of Cu/Ta chemical interactions, and affect the kinetics of Cu diffusion into bulk Ta. On clean Ta, monolayer coverages of Cu will de-wet only above 600 K. A partial monolayer of adsorbed oxygen (3L O2 at 300 K) results in a lowering of the de-wetting temperature to 500 K, while saturation oxygen coverage (10 L O2, 300 K) results in de-wetting at 300 K. Carbide formation also lowers the de-wetting temperature to 300 K. Diffusion of Cu into the Ta substrate at 1100 K occurs only after a 5-minute induction period. This induction period increases to 10 min for partially oxidized Ta, 15 min for carbidic Ta and 20 min for fully oxidized Ta. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2255/
Adsorbate-enhanced Corrosion Processes at Iron and Iron Oxide Surfaces
This study was intended to provide a fuller understanding of the surface chemical processes which result in the corrosion of ferrous materials. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279113/
The Adsorption of Radioactive Isotopes on Precipitates
This thesis concerns the investigation of radioisotopes as indicators for precipitation reactions. As a precipitate forms in the presence of a radioisotope, adsorption may take place on its surface. If this adsorption changes markedly at the stoichiometric point it will be possible to use this variation as an indicator for the reaction. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130352/
The Adsorption of Radioactive Isotopes on Specific Precipitates
The purpose of this investigation is to reveal the effects of certain factors affecting adsorption on some specific precipitates. It is hoped that the choice of precipitate types will enable extension of the information gained here to other precipitates similar to those investigated. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130408/
Advancements in Instrumentation for Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy
The efforts of my research have led to the successful construction of several instruments that have helped expand the field of microwave spectroscopy. The classic Balle-Flygare spectrometer has been modified to include two different sets of antenna to operate in the frequency ranges 6-18 GHz and 18-26 GHz, allowing it to function for a large range without having to break vacuum. This modified FTMW instrument houses two low noise amplifiers in the vacuum chamber to allow for the LNAs to be as close to the antenna as physically possible, improving sensitivity. A new innovative Balle-Flygare type spectrometer, the efficient low frequency FTMW, was conceived and built to operate at frequencies as low as 500 MHz through the use of highly curved mirrors. This is new for FTMW techniques that normally operate at 4 GHz or higher with only a few exceptions around 2 GHz. The chirped pulse FTMW spectrometer uses horn antennas to observe spectra that span 2 GHz versus the standard 1 MHz of a cavity technique. This instrument decreases the amount of time to obtain a large spectral region of relative correct intensity molecular transitions. A Nd:YAG laser ablation apparatus was attached to the classic Balle-Flygare and chirped pulse FTMW spectrometers. This allowed the study of heavy metal containing compounds. The instruments I constructed and the techniques I used have allowed the discovery of further insights into molecular chemistry. I have seen the effects of fluorinating an alkyl halide by determining the geometry of the carbon backbone of trans-1-iodoperfluoropropane and observing a ΔJ = 3 forbidden transition caused by a strong quadrupole coupling constant on this heavy molecule. The quadrupole coupling tensors of butyronitrile, a molecule observed in space, have been improved. The nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor of difluoroiodomethane was added to a list of variably fluorinated methyl halides upholding a trend for the magnitude of χzz. The study of SrS led to the determination of the Born-Oppenheimer breakdown terms and improving the precision of the SrS internuclear distance. I have also conducted the first pure rotational spectroscopic investigation on an actinide containing molecule, ThO. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84308/
Affordances of Instrumentation in General Chemistry Laboratories
The purpose of this study is to find out what students in the first chemistry course at the undergraduate level (general chemistry for science majors) know about the affordances of instrumentation used in the general chemistry laboratory and how their knowledge develops over time. Overall, students see the PASCO™ system as a useful and accurate measuring tool for general chemistry labs. They see the probeware as easy to use, portable, and able to interact with computers. Students find that the PASCO™ probeware system is useful in their general chemistry labs, more advanced chemistry labs, and in other science classes, and can be used in a variety of labs done in general chemistry. Students learn the affordances of the probeware through the lab manual, the laboratory teaching assistant, by trial and error, and from each other. The use of probeware systems provides lab instructors the opportunity to focus on the concepts illustrated by experiments and the opportunity to spend time discussing the results. In order to teach effectively, the instructor must know the correct name of the components involved, how to assemble and disassemble it correctly, how to troubleshoot the software, and must be able to replace broken or missing components quickly. The use of podcasts or Web-based videos should increase student understanding of affordances of the probeware. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc30510/
Aldohaloketenes and the Stereochemistry of Aldohaloketene Cycloadditions
The objective of this research problem was to synthesize aldohaloketenes and investigate the chemistry of this new class of ketenes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164399/
Aluminum and Copper Chemical Vapor Deposition on Fluoropolymer Dielectrics and Subsequent Interfacial Interactions
This study is an investigation of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of aluminum and copper on fluoropolymer surfaces and the subsequent interfacial interactions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279304/
Amine Derivatives of 3-chloro-5(8?)-nitro-1,4-naphthoquinone
This work deals with the preparation of amine derivatives of 3-chloro-5(8?)-nitro-1,4-naphthoquinone which are to be tested for anti-tubercular activity by Parke, Davis and Company. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130300/
Amino Acid Complexes of Rhodium(III)
This thesis will explore and study rhodium, a group VIII element that has rarely been studied. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130648/
a-Amino Alcohol Derivatives of Methyl P-Nitrophenyl Acetate
This thesis describes the synthesis of a series of dialkylaminoalkoxy derivatives of methyl p-nitrophenylacetate for testing as anti-histamine or hay fever drugs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75629/
An Analysis of Elementary Science Material Included in Certain Courses of Study and Text Books
The purpose of this study is to assess the contribution of elementary science to the curriculum. The finding of the investigation summarized in table form. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29866/
An analysis of the effectiveness of computer assisted instruction in general chemistry at an urban university.
The science-major General Chemistry sequence offered at the University of Houston has been investigated with respect to the effectiveness of recent incorporation of various levels of computer technology. As part of this investigation, questionnaire responses, student evaluations and grade averages and distributions from up to the last ten years have been analyzed and compared. Increased use of web-based material is both popular and effective, particularly with respect to providing extra information and supplemental questions. Instructor contact via e-mail is also well-received. Both uses of technology should be encouraged. In contrast, electronic classroom presentation is less popular. While initial use may lead to improved grades and retention, these levels decrease quickly, possibly due to a reduction in instructor spontaneity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3129/
An Analysis of the Naphtha Cut of Cooke county, Texas, Crude Oil
This study attempted to determine hydrocarbons in the crude oil by comparing the results obtained using the two methods of analysis: chemical analysis and Kurtz-Headington analysis. The Kurtz-Headington analysis was found to be adequate to determine hydrocarbons in the crude oil. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29917/
ANTI preference of the pyramidalized radical center to the two fluorines in difluoro cyclic compounds.
An extensive study of disubstituted cycloalkanes like CnH2n where n=3,4,5 and 6 using DFT((U)B3LYP/6-31G(d) and 6-311+G(2df,2p)) calculations is presented focusing on the effect of pyramidalization of the radical center. A potential energy surface (PES) analysis shows that the radical prefers to pyramidalize anti to the two cis fluorines in the disubstituted cycloalkanes. The degree of pyramidalization for 1,2-difluorocyclopropyl radical is 43.9o away from the cis fluorines whereas for 1,3-difluorocyclobutyl radical, 1,3-difluorocyclopentyl radical and 1,3-difluorocyclohexyl radical is 3.8o, 5.4o and 14.5o respectively away from the cis fluorines. The importance of this pyramidality effect in these compounds is discussed in context with the carbon-hydrogen bond dissociation energies (BDE's) because the preference of the radical centers to pyramidalize anti to the fluorines affects the bond dissociation energy. Importance of steric effect and unfavorable electronic interactions have been extensively explored in planar permethylated cyclobutadiene (Me4CBD) and cyclooctatetraene (Me8COT) using ((U)B3LYP/6-31G(d) and 6-311+G(2df,2p)) calculations. It is thought that steric interactions dominate electronic interactions in Me8COT, while this works opposite in case of Me4CBT. Instead, in Me4CBD the number of unfavorable electronic interactions between π bonds and out-of-plane hydrogens plays the dominant role in determining the relative energies. Interactions between the π bonds of CBD and the out-of-plane hydrogens on carbons attached to the four-membered ring becomes very interesting when the ring size changes. With ethano bridge on the cyclobutadiene ring interaction with the diagonal bonds results in non-bonding AOs across the other diagonal having the opposite phase in the highest occupied (HO)MO. If the HOMO and LUMO are switched, bis-ethano-bridged tetrahedrane is formed. It is suggested that bis-ethano-bridged tetrahedrane is thermodynamically more stable than bis-ethano-bridged cyclobutadienes. While the reverse is true for unsubstituted cyclobutadienes. The ability of ethano bridges to reverse the usual order is because it causes the doubly-bonded carbons to pyramidalize. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6047/
Application of Concentration, Adsorption and pH in the Precipitation of the Metal Ions of Groups II and III
In this thesis, the process involved in the precipitations and separations of the metal of Group II and Group III studied. Suggestions have also been offered whereby students can make an analysis without loosing metals in the initial precepitation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29846/
An Application of the Reformatsky Reaction to the Thiophene Series of Compounds
In view of the increasing importance of thiophene derivatives as chemotherapeutic agents, it was considered of interest to apply the Reformatsky reaction to the synthesis of compounds containing the thiophene nucleus with the thought that these might serve as intermediates for further syntheses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83566/
Applications of nanomanipulation coupled to nanospray mass spectrometry in trace fiber analysis and cellular lipid analysis.
The novel instrumentation of nanomanipulation coupled to nanospray mass spectrometry and its applications are presented. The nanomanipulator has the resolution of 10nm step sizes allowing for specific fine movement used to probe and characterize objects of interest. Nanospray mass spectrometry only needs a minimum sample volume of 300nl and a minimum sample size of 300attograms to analyze an analyte making it the ideal instrument to couple to nanomanipulation. The nanomanipulator is mounted to an inverted microscope and consists of 4 nano-positioners; these nano-positioners hold end-effectors and other tools used for manipulation. This original coupling has been used to enhance the current abilities of cellular probing and trace fiber analysis. Experiments have been performed to demonstrate the functionality of this instrument and its capabilities. Histidine and caffeine have been sampled directly from single fibers and analyzed. Lipid bodies from cotton seeds have been sampled indirectly and analyzed. The few applications demonstrated are only the beginning of nanomanipulation coupled to nanospray mass spectrometry and the possible applications are numerous especially with the ability to design and fabricate new end-effectors with unique abilities. Future study will be done to further the applications in direct cellular probing including toxicology studies and organelle analysis of single cells. Further studies will be directed in forensic applications of this instrument including gunshot residue sampled from fibers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9760/
An Approach Towards the Total Synthesis of Clonostachydiol
The syntheses of the unsymmetrical 14-membered bismacrolides have been reviewed. A total synthesis of clonostachydiol, the latest to join this family, has been attempted using trimethylsilyl acetylene as the builiding block and palladium catalyzed reactions for the formation of key bonds. The alkyne groups were introduced by Stille coupling of trimethylstannylethynyltrimethylsilane with an acid chloride for one fragment and by addition of lithiotrimethylsilyl acetylene to an aldehyde for the other. Lactic acid derivatives were chosen as starting materials for both fragments, thus introducing two of the chiral centers. The remaining stereocenters were introduced using stereoselective reductions of ketones. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278800/
Aromatic Amino Acid Studies
Pyridine ring analogs of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine were synthesized and studied in microbiological and mammalian systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164455/
The Ascorbic Acid Metabolism of Fifty College Women in the North Texas State Teachers College
A study of the ascorbic acid metabolism of a group of fifty college women in the North Texas State Teachers College between the months of April and July, 1943. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75486/
Attempted Synthesis of 5,5-di(2-thienyl)barbituric acid
This study is an attempted synthesis of dithienyl barbituric acid. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75364/
Attempted Synthesis of 5-Allyl-5-(2-Thienyl)-Barbituric Acid
This thesis describes attempts to synthesize 5-allyl-5-(2-thienyl)-barbituric acid as an improved anticonvulsant. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75643/
Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation of 1,7- & 1,9-dibromopentacyclo[5.4.0.02,6.03,10.05,9]undecane-8,11-dione
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Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 1,9-dibromopentacyclo[5.4.0.02,6.03,10.05,9]undecane-8,11-dione (1,9-dibromo-PCU-8,11-dione) was performed by using an excess amount of m-chloroperbenzoic acid (3 equivalents) and resulted in the formation of the corresponding monolactone. The reaction would not proceed to the dilactone stage. The structure of the reaction product was established unequivocally via single crystal X-ray diffraction. Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 1,9-dibromo-PCU-8,11-dione using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) was also performed and afforded a mixture of lactones. Only one of these lactones, which also contained an alkene functionality, could be isolated and characterized. 1,7-dibromo-PCU-8,11-dione was also reacted with CAN, yielding the mono-lactone, which has also been characterized. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4471/
Barbituric Acids as Anticonvulsants. IV. 5-Substituted-Mercapto Derivatives of 5-Phenylbarbituric Acids.
This study involves compounds of the barbituric acid series are well known for their use as anesthetics and sedatives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc97052/
Barbituric Acids. VI. 5-substituted-mercapto Derivatives of 5-ethylbarbituric Acid
The reaction of 5-bromo-5-ethylbarbituric acid with mercaptan and pyridine in cold ether solution was studied and was found to be satisfactory for the preparation of the compounds reported in this work. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130369/
Barbituric Acids. VII. 5-alkyl-derivatives of 5-ethoxy-barbituric Acid
A great deal of research has been devoted in recent years to the search for new drugs for the treatment of epilepsy and related convulsive disorders. This emphasis is occasioned by the fact that no one drug is effective for all patients, and also by the fact that the toxicity of a drug varies considerably from one patient to another. Among the most effective drugs are certain members of the hydantoin and barbituric acid series. For some time there has been in progress in this laboratory an investigation of members of these two series in which a hetro atom attached directly to the hetrocyclic nucleus is introduced into the side chain at position five of these two series. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130416/
Barbituric Acids. VIII. 5-substituted-5-(1-pyrrolidyl)barbituric Acids
The purpose of this investigation then was the preparation of a series of 5-substituted-5-(1-pyrrolidyl)barbituric acids in which R would consist of alkyl groups ranging in size from methyl to amyl, and other groups such as phenyl and benzyl. These compounds are to be tested elsewhere for hypnotic and anticonvulsant activity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107955/
Barbituric Acids. V. 5-substituted-mercapto Derivatives of 5-isoamylbarbituric Acid
Since no mention has been found in the literature of any 5-substituted mercapto-5-alkyl derivatives of barbituric acid, it was thought to be of interest to prepare a series of compounds containing sulfur attached directly to the barbituric acid nucleus. 5-substituted mercapto-5-isoamylbarbituric acids were chosen as representative of barbituric acids in which the alkyl group has a fairly high molecular weight. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163823/
Base Effects on the Thermal Decomposition of Sec-butyllithium Solutions
The pyrolysis of sec-butyllithium in solution was studied in an attempt to understand the loss of stereo-specificity and the atypical kinetics that have been reported. Additionally, the effect of added lithium alkoxides was studied to determine their effects on the highly reactive sec-butyllithium substrate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130677/
Biological Inhibitors
Four isosteric series of plant growth-regulating compounds were prepared. Using an Avena sativa coleptile assay system, derivatives in series I and IV inhibited segment elongation to a greater degree than did comparable derivatives in series II and III. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164532/
Bis Ammonium Salts of Dialkylaminoalkoxypropionitriles
This paper concerns the preparation of some bis derivatives of dialkylaminoalkoxypropionitirles from trimethylene, hexamethylene, octomethylene, and decamethylene bromides. These compounds are to be tested for curariform activity and anesthetic values by Parke, Davis and Company. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107980/
Bonding Studies in Group IV Substituted n,n-dimethylanilines
The purpose of the present work is to study the effects of the trimethylsilyl and trimethylgermyl substituents on the N,N-dimethylamino ring system. Both ground and excited state interactions were studied and their magnitudes determined. The experimental data were then used in conjunction with molecular orbital calculations to differentiate among, and determine the importance of, d-p bonding, hyperconjugation or polarization of the trimethylsilyl group on the ground and excited state bonding. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164513/
Bonding Studies on Organolithium Compounds
This study is concerned with the nature of the relatively unusual bonding which occurs in organolithium compounds as a direct result of the oligomerization and possible explanations for that bonding. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131022/
Boron Nitride by Atomic Layer Deposition: A Template for Graphene Growth
The growth of single and multilayer BN films on several substrates was investigated. A typical atomic layer deposition (ALD) process was demonstrated on Si(111) substrate with a growth rate of 1.1 Å/cycle which showed good agreement with the literature value and a near stoichiometric B/N ratio. Boron nitride films were also deposited by ALD on Cu poly crystal and Cu(111) single crystal substrates for the first time, and a growth rate of ~1ML/ALD cycle was obtained with a B/N ratio of ~2. The realization of a h-BN/Cu heterojunction was the first step towards a graphene/h-BN/Cu structure which has potential application in gateable interconnects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84305/
Carbon Nanostructure Based Donor-acceptor Systems for Solar Energy Harvesting
Carbon nanostructure based functional hybrid molecules hold promise in solarenergy harvesting. Research presented in this dissertation systematically investigates building of various donor-acceptor nanohybrid systems utilizing enriched single walled carbon nanotube and graphene with redox and photoactive molecules such as fullerene, porphyrin, and phthalocyanine. Design, synthesis, and characterization of the donor-acceptor hybrid systems have been carefully performed via supramolecular binding strategies. Various spectroscopic studies have provided ample information in terms of establishment of the formation of donor-acceptor hybrids and their extent of interaction in solution and eventual rate of photoinduced electron and/or energy transfer. Electrochemical studies enabled construction of energy level diagram revealing energetic details of the possible different photochemical events supported by computational studies carried out to establish the HOMO-LUMO levels in the donor acceptor systems. Transient absorption studies confirmed formation of charge separated species in the donor-acceptor systems which have been supported by electron mediation experiments. Based on the photoelectrochemical studies, IPCE of 8% was reported for enriched SWCNT(7,6)-ZnP donor-acceptor systems. In summary, the present investigation on the various nanocarbon sensitized donor-acceptor hybrids substantiates tremendous prospect, that could very well become the next generation of materials in building efficient solar energy harvesting devices andphotocatalyst. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407823/
Characterization of Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds in Enzyme Catalysis: an Ab Initio and DFT Investigation
Hartree-Fock, Moller-Plesset, and density functional theory calculations have been carried out using 6-31+G(d), 6-31+G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets to study the properties of low-barrier or short-strong hydrogen bonds (SSHB) and their potential role in enzyme-catalyzed reactions that involve proton abstraction from a weak carbon-acid by a weak base. Formic acid/formate anion, enol/enolate and other complexes have been chosen to simulate a SSHB system. These complexes have been calculated to form very short, very short hydrogen bonds with a very low barrier for proton transfer from the donor to the acceptor. Two important environmental factors including small amount of solvent molecules that could possibly exist at the active site of an enzyme and the polarity around the active site were simulated to study their energetic and geometrical influences to a SSHB. It was found that microsolvation that improves the matching of pK as of the hydrogen bond donor and acceptor involved in the SSHB will always increase the interaction of the hydrogen bond; microsolvation that disrupts the matching of pKas, on the other hand, will lead to a weaker SSHB. Polarity surrounding the SSHB, simulated by SCRF-SCIPCM model, can significantly reduce the strength and stability of a SSHB. The residual strength of a SSHB is about 10--11 kcal/mol that is still significantly stable compared with a traditional weak hydrogen bond that is only about 3--5 kcal/mol in any cases. These results indicate that SSHB can exist under polar environment. Possible reaction intermediates and transition states for the reaction catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase were simulated to study the stabilizing effect of a SSHB on intermediates and transition states. It was found that at least one SSHB is formed in each of the simulated intermediate-catalyst complexes, strongly supporting the LBHB mechanism proposed by Cleland and Kreevoy. Computational results on the activation energy for catalyzed and uncatalyzed model reactions shows that strong hydrogen bonding between catalyst and the substrate at the transition state can significantly reduce the activation energy. This implies that LBHBs are possibly playing a crucial role in enzyme catalysis by supplying significant stabilizing energy to the reaction transition state. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278586/
Characterization of Novel Solvents and Absorbents for Chemical Separations
Predictive methods have been employed to characterize chemical separation mediums including solvents and absorbents. These studies included creating Abraham solvation parameter models for room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) utilizing novel ion-specific and group contribution methodologies, polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) utilizing standard methodology, and the micelles cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) utilizing a combined experimental setup methodology with indicator variables. These predictive models allows for the characterization of both standard and new chemicals for use in chemical separations including gas chromatography (GC), solid phase microextraction (SPME), and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). Gas-to-RTIL and water-to-RTIL predictive models were created with a standard deviation of 0.112 and 0.139 log units, respectively, for the ion-specific model and with a standard deviation of 0.155 and 0.177 log units, respectively, for the group contribution fragment method. Enthalpy of solvation for solutes dissolved into ionic liquids predictive models were created with ion-specific coefficients to within standard deviations of 1.7 kJ/mol. These models allow for the characterization of studied ionic liquids as well as prediction of solute-solvent properties of previously unstudied ionic liquids. Predictive models were created for the logarithm of solute's gas-to-fiber sorption and water-to-fiber sorption coefficient for polydimethyl siloxane for wet and dry conditions. These models were created to standard deviations of 0.198 and 0.122 logunits for gas-to-PDMS wet and dry, respectively, as well as 0.164 and 0.134 log units for water-to-PDMS wet and dry, respectively. These models are particularly useful in solid phase microextraction separations. Micelles were studied to create predictive models of the measured micelle-water partition coefficient as well as models of measured MEKC chromatographic retention factors for CTAB and SDS. The resultant predictive models were created with standard deviations of 0.190 log units for the logarithm of the mole fraction concentration of water-to-CTAB, 0.171 log units for the combined logarithms of both the mole fraction concentration of water-to-CTAB and measured MEKC chromatographic retention factors for CTAB, and 0.153 log units for the combined logarithms of both the mole fraction concentration of water-to-SDS and measured MEKC chromatographic retention factors for SDS. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67989/
A Chemical Analysis of Soft Wheat
The purpose of this piece of research is to determine the chemical composition of soft winter wheat, and to make a comparative study of it. A study is also made concerning its possibilities as a balanced food. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70273/
A Chemical Analysis of the Blackeyed Pea
The purpose of this research problem is to determine the chemical composition of the blackeyed pea and to make a comparative study of the results. The value of the blackeyed pea as food, its chemical nature, and possible industrial uses are studied and recorded. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70288/
Chemical Analysis of the Bottom Deposits of Artificial Lakes with Special Emphasis on Lake Dallas
This study is for the purpose of determining the chemical content of typical artificial reservoir bottom deposits. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70267/
A Chemical Analysis of the Important Soils of Dimmit County, Texas
The purpose of this study is to collect sample soils from uncontaminated horizon (by digging completely through the soil profile or strata) and provide a chemical analysis of the important soils of Dimmit county, Texas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29922/
The Chemical Analysis of the Mebane Cottonseed Kernel
The purpose of this work is to make a fairly complete chemical analysis of the Mebane 804-50 cottonseed kernel. A brief history of cotton plant and the economic value of its products are also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70290/
A Chemical Analysis of the Peanut
The object of this paper is to make an analysis of the mineral and food content of the peanut and to compare them with a balanced food. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83334/
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