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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Physics
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Electron Density and Collision Frequency Studies Using a Resonant Microwave Cavity as a Probe
Electron densities and collision frequencies were obtained on a number of gases in a dc discharge at low pressures (0.70-2mm of Hg). These measurements were performed by microwave probing of a filament of the dc discharge placed coaxially in a resonant cavity operating in a TM₀₁₀ mode. The equipment and techniques for making the microwave measurements employing the resonant cavity are described. One of the main features of this investigation is the technique of differentiating the resonance signal of the loaded cavity in order to make accurate measurements of the resonant frequency and half-power point frequencies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279091/
Transport Phenomena in Indium Arsenide at Low Temperatures
This thesis looks at the transport phenomena in indium arsenide at low temperatures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131011/
Solutions of the Equations of Radiative Transfer by an Invariant Imbedding Approach
This thesis is a study of the solutions of the equations of radiative transfer by an invariant imbedding approach. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131045/
Monte Carlo Calculations of Reflected Intensities for Real Spherical Atmospheres
To calculate the emergent radiation field, a realistic atmospheric model and algorithm must be developed. The radiation field may be characterized by the emergent intensities of scattered light. This is possible only if the algorithm determines these intensities as dependent upon atmospheric and angular parameters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131064/
Boundary Scattering of Electrons in Thin Cadmium Single Crystals
In the present investigation, zinc was plated onto a cadmium crystal to determine the effect on the scattering parameter. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130996/
Size Effect in the Electrical Conductivity of Bismuth
If a physical dimension of a metallic specimen is comparable with, or smaller than, the mean free path of the conduction electrons, then the observed electrical conductivity will be less than that of a conventional bulk sample. This phenomenon is called a size effect, and is the result of electron scattering from the specimen surfaces. In the present investigation, measurements were made on electropolished monocrystalline specimens ranging from matchbox geometry to thick-film geometry in order to obtain further information on the size effect in bismuth at liquid helium temperatures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130880/
The Effects of Lead Placement and Sample Shape in the Measurement of Electrical Resistivity
This thesis is a study of the effects of lead placement and sample shape in the measurement of electrical resistivity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131303/
A Study of the Decay Levels of 169/Tm69
The purpose of this investigation was to study the radiations of the 169/Tm nucleus as it de-excites after the electron capture decay of the 169/Yb. Numerous unreported gammas were present in the sample. The origins of these gamma rays were found. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131328/
Phase Shift Determination for Elastic Potential Scattering, Using the IBM 360-50 Computer
The primary objective of this paper is to present a computerized method for the extraction of phase shifts from an angular distribution. This was accomplished using a least squares curve fitting routine. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131381/
Carbon Contamination Measurements in Single Silicon Crystals
The intent of this investigation was to directly measure the amount of carbon contamination in a single silicon crystal and, in so doing, develop a mathematical procedure that would be applicable to other contaminants in other substances. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131331/
Nuclear Reactions on the Palladium Isotopes
The problem of interest in this investigation was to determine the cross sections of five nuclear reactions which occur when irradiating natural palladium with neutrons which have energy values of 15.1, 15.9, and 16.3 MeV. The cross sections were measured relative to a copper monitor which was "sandwitched" in with the palladium target. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131351/
Investigation of the Uniaxial Stress Dependence of the Effective Mass in N-Type InSb Using the Magnetophonon Effect
The magnetophonon effect was used to investigate the uniaxial stress dependence of the effective mass in n-type InSb (indium antimonide). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164537/
A Study of Minority Atomic Ion Recombination in the Helium Afterglow
Electron-ion recombination has been under study for many years, but comparisons between theory and experiment have been very difficult, especially for conditions where the ion under evaluation was a minority in concentration. This study describes a direct measurement of the recombination-rate coefficient for the recombination of minority as well as majority ions in the afterglow. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164590/
Gamma Ray Distribution from Neutron Excitation in Cesium
The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the gamma rays resulting from excitation of Cs133 by the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons and to determine the relative intensity of each gamma ray. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163933/
Gamma Rays Resulting from Neutron Scattering in Cesium
The purpose of this investigation was to attempt to resolve the energy levels of Cs133 that can be excited by inelastic scattering of 14 Mev neutrons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163901/
A Study of the Celestial Gamma-ray Flux
This thesis is a study of the celestial gamma-ray flux. It reviews several of the proposed mechanisms for producing high energy gamma rays and describes several of the attempts to detect their presence. Also included is a short historical review of the spark chamber, along with a qualitative description of its operation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163905/
The Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Susceptibility of Galvinoxyl
The twofold purpose of this investigation was to design and construct an apparatus for direct magnetic susceptibility measurements as a function of temperature and to provide the complete susceptibility characterization of the free radical galvinoxyl in the room temperature-liquid nitrogen range. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163921/
The Dielectric Constant of Galvinoxyl
The molecules in many substances are know to undergo at characteristic temperatures a change in their rotational freedom in the solid state, signifying either a change in structure of the material of the onset of limited rotation of the molecule about some symmetry axis. The purpose of this research was to determine from dielectric constant measurements over the 100°K-420°K temperature range whether or not the organic free radical galvinoxyl and its diamagnetic parent molecule, dihydroxydiphenylmethane, undergo any such transitions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163926/
Microwave Cavity Method for Measuring Plasma Properties
This discussion is concerned primarily with communications blackout during spacecraft entry into a planetary atmosphere. The gas in the shock layer, between shock wave and vehicle surface, ionizes from the intense heating which takes place in the bow shock wave and a viscous region of high gas enthalpy. This ionization may persist throughout the subsequent flow over the vehicle and into the wake, thus completely engulfing the vehicle and its communications elements. The problem will be to simulate a plasma model that will be of interest for hypervelocity reentry vehicles and to provide meaningful expressions for the various plasma parameters of interest (electron density, electron temperature, collision frequency, etc.) in terms of the microwave measurables (amplitude, phase shifts, frequency shifts, polarization, etc.) digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163950/
Size Dependence in the Electrical Conductivity of Bismuth
In the present investigation, measurements were made at liquid-helium temperatures on single-crystal bismuth samples which had a stair-step geometry in order to study several thicknesses during one helium run. These samples were also thinned to extend the thickness range of the steps to a thinner region. In addition J.E. Parrott's theory is extended to include a diagonal anisotropic relaxation-time tensor and the effect of holes on the size effect. A discussion of the theory of Parrott, and the extension of Parrott's theory in connection with the experimental results is presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131132/
Measurement of the Atomic-oxygen Concentration under Simulated Upper Atmosphere Conditions
This thesis describes an experimental technique for measuring the atomic-oxygen concentration under simulated upper atmosphere conditions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131196/
Recombination Rate Coefficient Measurements in the Helium Afterglow
This thesis describes a method of determining the recombination rate coefficient experimentally, which does not depend on a specific model of the recombination process. With this method established, results are presented for the recombination rate coefficient measurements at 44.6 Torr. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131182/
Application of the Wigner Formalism to a Slightly Relativistic Quantum Plasma
A slightly relativistic fermion gas is described by the dynamical theory obtained from the Wigner distribution function. The problem is approached in a self-consistent manner including the two-body Darwin Hamiltonian. The goal is to find the departures from equilibrium and dispersion relations for wave propagation in the gas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130850/
Gurevich Magnetomorphic Oscillations in Single Crystals of Aluminum at Helium Temperatures
The Sondheimer theory was tested by looking for oscillatory phenomena in a group of single crystals representing a range in dimensions from matchbox geometry to thin-film geometry. The single crystals were identical with respect to impurity content, strain, orientation, surface condition, and probe placement. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130866/
On Chaos and Anomalous Diffusion in Classical and Quantum Mechanical Systems
The phenomenon of dynamically induced anomalous diffusion is both the classical and quantum kicked rotor is investigated in this dissertation. We discuss the capability of the quantum mechanical version of the system to reproduce for extended periods the corresponding classical chaotic behavior. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278244/
Steady-state and Dynamic Probe Characteristics in a Low-density Plasma
The problem with which this investigation is concerned is that of determining the steady-state and dynamic characteristics of the admittance of a metallic probe immersed in a laboratory plasma which has the low electron densities and low electron temperatures characteristic of the ionospheric plasma. The problem is separated into three related topics: the design and production of the laboratory plasma, the measurement of the steady-state properties of dc and very low frequency probe admittance, and the study of transient ion sheath effects on radio frequency probe admittance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278232/
Evolution of Vacancy Supersaturations in MeV Si Implanted Silicon
High-energy Si implantation into silicon creates a net defect distribution that is characterized by an excess of interstitials near the projected range and a simultaneous excess of vacancies closer to the surface. This defect distribution is due to the spatial separation between the distributions of interstitials and vacancies created by the forward momentum transferred from the implanted ion to the lattice atom. This dissertation investigates the evolution of the near-surface vacancy excess in MeV Si-implanted silicon both during implantation and post-implant annealing. Although previous investigations have identified a vacancy excess in MeV-implanted silicon, the investigations presented in this dissertation are unique in that they are designed to correlate the free-vacancy supersaturation with the vacancies in clusters. Free-vacancy (and interstitial) supersaturations were measured with Sb (B) dopant diffusion markers. Vacancies in clusters were profiled by Au labeling; a new technique based on the observation that Au atoms trap in the presence of open-volume defects. The experiments described in this dissertation are also unique in that they were designed to isolate the deep interstitial excess from interacting with the much shallower vacancy excess during post-implant thermal processing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277663/
Ion Beam Synthesis of Carbon Assisted Nanosystems in Silicon Based Substrates
The systematic study of the formation of β-SiC formed by low energy carbon ion (C-)implantation into Si followed by high temperature annealing is presented. The research is performed to explore the optimal annealing conditions. The formation of crystalline β-SiC is clearly observed in the sample annealed at 1100 °C for a period of 1 hr. Quantitative analysis is performed in the formation of β-SiC by the process of implantation of different carbon ion fluences of 1×1017, 2×1017, 5×1017, and 8×1017 atoms /cm2 at an ion energy of 65 keV into Si. It is observed that the average size of β-SiC crystals decreased and the amount of β-SiC crystals increased with the increase in the implanted fluences when the samples were annealed at 1100°C for 1 hr. However, it is observed that the amount of β-SiC linearly increased with the implanted fluences up to 5×1017 atoms /cm2. Above this fluence the amount of β-SiC appears to saturate. The stability of graphitic C-C bonds at 1100°C limits the growth of SiC precipitates in the sample implanted at a fluence of 8×1017 atoms /cm2 which results in the saturation behavior of SiC formation in the present study. Secondly, the carbon cluster formation process in silica and the characterization of formed clusters is presented. Silicon dioxide layers ~500 nm thick are thermally grown on a Si (100) wafer. The SiO2 layers are then implanted with 70 keV carbon ions at a fluence of 5×1017 atoms/cm2. The implanted samples are annealed 1100 °C for different time periods of 10 min., 30 min., 60 min., 90 min., and 120 min., in the mixture of argon and hydrogen gas (96 % Ar + 4% hydrogen). Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals UV to visible emission from the samples. A detail mechanism of the photoluminescence and its possible origin is discussed by correlating the structural and optical properties of the samples. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize the samples. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc68033/
Thorium and Uranium M-shell X-ray Production Cross Sections for 0.4 – 4.0 MeV Protons, 0.4 - 6.0 MeV Helium Ions, 4.5 – 11.3 MeV Carbon Ions, and 4.5 – 13.5 MeV Oxygen Ions.
The M-shell x-ray production cross section for thorium and uranium have been determined for protons of energy 0.4 - 4.0 MeV, helium ions of energy 0.4 - 6.0 MeV, carbon ions of energy 4.5 - 11.3 MeV and oxygen ions of energy 4.5 - 13.5 MeV. The total cross sections and the cross sections for individual x-ray peaks in the spectrum, consisting of the following transitions Mz (M4-N2, M5-N3, M4-N3), Ma (M5-N6,7), Mb (M4-N6, M5-O3, M4- O2), and Mg (M4-O3, M5-P3, M3-N4, M3-N5), were compared to the theoretical values determined from the PWBA + OBKN and ECUSAR. The theoretical values for the carbon and oxygen ions were also modified to take into account the effects of multiple ionizations of the target atom by the heavier ions. It is shown that the results of the ECUSAR theory tend to provide better agreement with the experimental data. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc68032/
Polymer Gels: Kinetics, Dynamics Studies and Their Applications as Biomaterials
The polymer gels especially hydrogels have a very special structure and useful features such as unusual volume phase transition, compatibility with biological systems, and sensitivity to environmental stimuli (temperature, pH value, electric field, light and more), which lead to many potential applications in physical and biochemical fields. This research includes: (1) the theoretical and experimental studies of polymer gels on swelling kinetics, spinodal decomposition, and solution convection in gel matrix; (2) applications of polymer gels in wound dressing, tissue-simulating optical phantom and gel display. The kinetics of gel swelling has been theoretically analyzed by considering coupled motions of both solvent and polymer network. Analytical solutions of the solvent and the network movement are derived from collective diffusion equations for a long cylindrical and a large disk gel. Kinetics of spinodal decomposition of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) polymer gel is investigated using turbidity and ultrasonic techniques. By probing movement of domains, a possible time-dependent gel structure in the spinodal decomposition region is presented. Theoretical studies of solution convection in gel matrix have been done and more analysis on dimensionless parameters is provided. To enhance the drug uptake and release capacity of silicone rubber (SR), NIPA hydrogel particles have been incorporated into a SR membrane. This SR/NIPA composite gel has promising attributes for wound dressing and other uses. Tissue-simulating optical phantom has been synthesized and studied using NIPA solution trapped inside a hydrogel. Polymer gels with engineered surface patterns were implemented. NIPA gel deposited on the surface of an acrylamide gel can be used as responsive gel display. A dynamically measurement technique of local shear modulus and swelling ratio of gel is presented based on an engineered periodic surface pattern as square array. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4379/
Oligonucleotide guanosine conjugated to gallium nitride nano-structures for photonics.
In this work, I studied the hybrid system based on self-assembled guanosine crystal (SAGC) conjugated to wide-bandgap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN). Guanosine is one of the four bases of DNA and has the lowest oxidation energy, which favors carrier transport. It also has large dipole moment. Guanosine molecules self-assemble to ribbon-like structure in confined space. GaN surface can have positive or negative polarity depending on whether the surface is Ga- or N-terminated. I studied SAGC in confined space between two electrodes. The current-voltage characteristics can be explained very well with the theory of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structure. I-V curves also show strong rectification effect, which can be explained by the intrinsic polarization along the axis of ribbon-like structure of SAGC. GaN substrate property influences the properties of SAGC. So SAGC has semiconductor properties within the confined space up to 458nm. When the gap distance gets up to 484nm, the structure with guanosine shows resistance characteristics. The photocurrent measurements show that the bandgap of SAGC is about 3.3-3.4eV and affected by substrate properties. The MSM structure based on SAGC can be used as photodetector in UV region. Then I show that the periodic structure based on GaN and SAGC can have photonic bandgaps. The bandgap size and the band edges can be tuned by tuning lattice parameters. Light propagation and emission can be tuned by photonic crystals. So the hybrid photonic crystal can be potentially used to detect guanosine molecules. If guanosine molecules are used as functional linker to other biomolecules which usually absorb or emit light in blue to UV region, the hybrid photonic crystal can also be used to tune the coupling of light source to guanosine molecules, then to other biomolecules. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9065/
Energy Losses of Protons Projected through a Plasma Due to Collisions with Electrons of the Plasma for a Variety of Non-Maxwellian Electron Velocity Distributions
The purpose of this thesis is to study energy losses suffered by protons in traversing a plasma through collision with the electrons of the plasma. For these electrons a variety of non-Maxwellian velocity distributions are assumed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130468/
A Computer Analysis of Complex Gamma-Ray Spectra
The purpose of this investigation was to provide a method for determining the relative intensities of all gamma rays in a particular spectrum, and thereby determine the relative transition probabilities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130612/
Galvanomagnetic Phenomena in Arsenic at Liquid Helium Temperatures
The purpose of this investigation was to study some of the transport effects in a single crystal of arsenic at liquid helium temperatures in a magnetic field up to twenty-four kilogauss. The experimental coefficients determined were the isothermal magnetoresistivity and the isothermal Hall resistivity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130697/
Thermomagnetic Effects in Antimony at 4.2 [degrees]K
The purpose of this investigation was to study the thermoelectric effects in a single crystal of antimony at liquid-helium temperatures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130643/
A Calculation of the Kaon-Neutron Scattering Cross Section
The purpose of this investigation was to study the scattering processes of K+ mesons with neutrons. In order to do such a study one must first make certain basic assumptions about the type of interaction involved and then proceed to calculate physically meaningful qualities which describe the processes. Thus, the problem is this: assuming the validity of Feynman's rules for these strongly interacting particles, calculate the differential and total scattering cross sections for the interaction of scalar K+ mesons and neutrons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130687/
Analyzing Magnet System for the Electrostatic Accelerator
This thesis describes the design and construction of a linear accelerator, specifically, a positive-ion source, a high voltage supply, an accelerating column, and the necessary associated vacuum system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130409/
Stochastic Mechanical Systems
To understand the phenomena associated with such stochastic processes and to predict, at least qualitatively, the behavior of mechanical systems within environments which are completely random in time, new mechanical tools are necessary. Fortunately, the derivation of these tools does not necessitate a complete departure from existing theories. In fact, they may be considered as an extension of the well-defined theory of the integral transform, in particular, the exponential Fourier integral transform. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130453/
Dynamical Friction Coefficients for Plasmas Exhibiting Non-Spherical Electron Velocity Distributions
This investigation is designed to find the net rate of decrease in the component of velocity parallel to the original direction of motion of a proton moving through an electron gas exhibiting a non-spherical velocity distribution. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130480/
D-D and D-T Neutron Excitation of Energy Levels in Cs133
The purpose of this experiment was to make positive assignment of the Cs133 energy levels excited by the inelastic scattering of neutrons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130455/
A Study of Emitter Drift in Transistors
The purpose of this investigation was to determine the parameters of emitter drift and to suggest a mechanism for this phenomenon. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130473/
Temperature Dependence of the Magnetic Susceptibility of the Organic Free Radical Galvinoxyl
This thesis examines temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of the organic free radical galvinoxyl. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163874/
Design and Testing of a Corona Column and a Closed Gas Distribution System for a Tandem Van de Graaff Voltage Generator
The purpose of this study had been to design and test a corona column and an insulating gas distribution system for a small tandem Van de Graaff. The intent of this paper is to describe the gas handling system and to compare experimentally the effects of corona electrode shape on the corona current carried between adjacent sections of the column. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163849/
A Microwave Spectrometer for Narrow-line Electron Spin Resonance Studies
This thesis explores the basic theory, design and construction of electron spin resonance spectrometer. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163881/
A Vacuum Tube for an Electrostatic Generator
The purpose of this study has been to construct two accelerating tubes with small beam apertures for the Van de Graaff, modifying the prototype tube designed and tested by Wiley (20), to design and construct a vacuum system for evacuating the tubes, and to determine the characteristics of the tube under operating conditions while installed in the generator. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163894/
The Diurnal Variation of Cosmic Radiation
The primary purpose of this investigation was to study the diurnal variation of cosmic-ray intensity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163872/
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in a Crystalline Stable Free Radical--Wurster's Blue Perchlorate
This thesis investigates the nuclear magnetic resonance in a crystalline stable free radical. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163873/
Design and Testing of a Positive Ion Accelerator and Necessary Vacuum System
This thesis is a study of the design and testing of a positive ion accelerator and necessary vacuum system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163830/
Antiferromagnetic Ordering in Picryl-Amino-Carbazyl
The purpose of the experiment was to investigate other paramagnetic salts to determine whether the W. B. perchlorate type peak was more common than previously suspected. An organic salt, picryl-n-amino-carbazyl, was chosen. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163864/
The Optimum Design of a Broad-band Helix for Use in Electron Spin Resonance
This thesis examines optimum designs for broad-band helix to be used in electron spin resonance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163904/
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