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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Physics
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Electron Density and Collision Frequency Studies Using a Resonant Microwave Cavity as a Probe
Electron densities and collision frequencies were obtained on a number of gases in a dc discharge at low pressures (0.70-2mm of Hg). These measurements were performed by microwave probing of a filament of the dc discharge placed coaxially in a resonant cavity operating in a TM₀₁₀ mode. The equipment and techniques for making the microwave measurements employing the resonant cavity are described. One of the main features of this investigation is the technique of differentiating the resonance signal of the loaded cavity in order to make accurate measurements of the resonant frequency and half-power point frequencies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279091/
Carbon nanotube/microwave interactions and applications to hydrogen fuel cells.
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One of the leading problems that will be carried into the 21st century is that of alternative fuels to get our planet away from the consumption of fossil fuels. There has been a growing interest in the use of nanotechnology to somehow aid in this progression. There are several unanswered questions in how to do this. It is known that carbon nanotubes will store hydrogen but it is unclear how to increase that storage capacity and how to remove this hydrogen fuel once stored. This document offers some answers to these questions. It is possible to implant more hydrogen in a nanotube sample using a technique of ion implantation at energy levels ~50keV and below. This, accompanied with the rapid removal of that stored hydrogen through the application of a microwave field, proves to be one promising avenue to solve these two unanswered questions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5796/
A New Approach for Transition Metal Free Magnetic Sic: Defect Induced Magnetism After Self-ion Implantation
SiC has become an attractive wide bandgap semiconductor due to its unique physical and electronic properties and is widely used in high temperature, high frequency, high power and radiation resistant applications. SiC has been used as an alternative to Si in harsh environments such as in the oil industry, nuclear power systems, aeronautical, and space applications. SiC is also known for its polytypism and among them 3C-SiC, 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC are the most common polytypes used for research purposes. Among these polytypes 4H-SiC is gaining importance due to its easy commercial availability with a large bandgap of 3.26 eV at room temperature. Controlled creation of defects in materials is an approach to modify the electronic properties in a way that new functionality may result. SiC is a promising candidate for defect-induced magnetism on which spintronic devices could be developed. The defects considered are of room temperature stable vacancy types, eliminating the need for magnetic impurities, which easily diffuse at room temperature. Impurity free vacancy type defects can be created by implanting the host atoms of silicon or carbon. The implantation fluence determines the defect density, which is a critical parameter for defect induced magnetism. Therefore, we have studied the influence of low fluence low energy silicon and carbon implantation on the creation of defects in n-type 4H-SiC. The characterization of the defects in these implanted samples was performed using the techniques, RBS-channeling and Raman spectroscopy. We have also utilized these characterization techniques to analyze defects created in much deeper layers of the SiC due to implantation of high energy nitrogen ions. The experimentally determined depths of the Si damage peaks due to low energy (60 keV) Si and C ions with low fluences (< 1015 cm-2) are consistent with the SRIM-2011 simulations. From RBS-C Si sub-lattice measurements for different fluences (1.1×1014 cm-2 to 3.2×1014 cm-2) of Si implantation in 4H-SiC, the Si vacancy density is estimated to range from 1.29×1022 cm-3 to 4.57×1022 cm-2, corresponding to average vacancy distances of 4.26 Å to 2.79 Å at the damage peak (50±5 nm). Similarly, for C implanted fluences (1.85×1014 cm-2 to 1×1015 cm-2), the Si vacancy density varies from 1.37×1022 cm-3 to 4.22×1022 cm-3 with the average vacancy distances from 4.17 Å to 2.87 Å at the damage peak (110±10 nm). From the Raman spectroscopy, the implantation-induced lattice disorders calculated along the c-axis (LO mode) and perpendicular to c-axis (TO mode) in 4H-SiC are found to be similar. Furthermore, the results obtained from SQUID measurements in C implanted n-type 4H-SiC sample with fluences ranging from 1×1012 to 1.7×1016 ions/cm2 have been discussed. The implanted samples showed diamagnetism similar to the unimplanted sample. To date, to our best of knowledge, no experimental work has been reported on investigating defect induced magnetism for self-ion implantation in n-type 4H-SiC. These first reports of experimental results can provide useful information in future studies for a better understanding of self-ion implantation in SiC-based DMS. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271849/
Theoretical Study of Second Harmonic Generation of a Blue Laser at 486 nm Using a BBO Crystal in a Standing Wave Buildup Cavity
For a spectroscopy purpose, we are interested in producing continuous wave (CW) UV laser light at 243 nm with at least 2 mW power. The theory of nonlinear optics suggests that we should be able to produce a desired 2.9 mW of 243 nm light by second harmonic generation (SHG) from a 50 mW blue laser at 486 nm using a BBO crystal in a build up cavity. The most important physical parameters are calculated. A 10 mm Brewster cut BBO crystal can provide phase matching conditions for coupling two ordinary photons at 486 nm and make a secondary beam at 243 nm. The single pass conversion efficiency is calculated not to be enough to generate 2.9 mW of SH light. My investigation shows that a standing wave build up cavity can provide a buildup factor of 94 and an overall conversion efficiency of 5.9% if one use an input coupler mirror with 1.1% transmission at 486 nm. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3132/
Photoelectric Emission Measurements for CVD Grown Polycrystalline Diamond Films
We examined CVD grown polycrystalline diamond films having different methane concentrations to detect defects and study the possible correlation between the methane concentration used during the growth process and the defect density. SEM and Raman results show that the amorphous and sp2 carbon content of the films increases with methane concentration. Furthermore, photoelectric emission from diamond is confirmed to be a two-photon process, hence the electrons are emitted from normally unoccupied states. We found that the photoelectric yield, for our samples, decreases with the increase in methane concentration. This trend can be accounted for in two different ways: either the types of defects observed in this experiment decrease in density as the methane concentration increases; or, the defect density stays the same or increases, but the increase in methane concentration leads to an increase in the electron affinity, which reduces the overall photoelectric yield. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2199/
Transport Phenomena in Indium Arsenide at Low Temperatures
This thesis looks at the transport phenomena in indium arsenide at low temperatures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131011/
Solutions of the Equations of Radiative Transfer by an Invariant Imbedding Approach
This thesis is a study of the solutions of the equations of radiative transfer by an invariant imbedding approach. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131045/
Monte Carlo Calculations of Reflected Intensities for Real Spherical Atmospheres
To calculate the emergent radiation field, a realistic atmospheric model and algorithm must be developed. The radiation field may be characterized by the emergent intensities of scattered light. This is possible only if the algorithm determines these intensities as dependent upon atmospheric and angular parameters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131064/
Boundary Scattering of Electrons in Thin Cadmium Single Crystals
In the present investigation, zinc was plated onto a cadmium crystal to determine the effect on the scattering parameter. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130996/
Size Effect in the Electrical Conductivity of Bismuth
If a physical dimension of a metallic specimen is comparable with, or smaller than, the mean free path of the conduction electrons, then the observed electrical conductivity will be less than that of a conventional bulk sample. This phenomenon is called a size effect, and is the result of electron scattering from the specimen surfaces. In the present investigation, measurements were made on electropolished monocrystalline specimens ranging from matchbox geometry to thick-film geometry in order to obtain further information on the size effect in bismuth at liquid helium temperatures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130880/
The Effects of Lead Placement and Sample Shape in the Measurement of Electrical Resistivity
This thesis is a study of the effects of lead placement and sample shape in the measurement of electrical resistivity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131303/
A Determination of the Bothe Depression Factor for Discs in Water
The purpose of this work is to determine experimentally the depression of the neutron density by a detecting foil. The depression factor is known as the "self-shading" of the foil. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130255/
A Study of the Decay Levels of 169/Tm69
The purpose of this investigation was to study the radiations of the 169/Tm nucleus as it de-excites after the electron capture decay of the 169/Yb. Numerous unreported gammas were present in the sample. The origins of these gamma rays were found. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131328/
(N, 2N) Cross Section Measurements in Praseodymium-141 as a Function of Neutron Bombarding Energy
Using the parallel disk method of activation analysis, the (n,2n) reaction cross section in 141-Pr was measured as a function of neutron energy in the range 15.4 to 18.4 MeV. The bombarding neutrons were produced from the 3-T(d,n)4-He reaction, where the deuterons were accelerated by the 3-MV Van de Graff generator of the North Texas Regional Physics Laboratory in Denton, Texas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131376/
Phase Shift Determination for Elastic Potential Scattering, Using the IBM 360-50 Computer
The primary objective of this paper is to present a computerized method for the extraction of phase shifts from an angular distribution. This was accomplished using a least squares curve fitting routine. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131381/
Carbon Contamination Measurements in Single Silicon Crystals
The intent of this investigation was to directly measure the amount of carbon contamination in a single silicon crystal and, in so doing, develop a mathematical procedure that would be applicable to other contaminants in other substances. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131331/
Nuclear Reactions on the Palladium Isotopes
The problem of interest in this investigation was to determine the cross sections of five nuclear reactions which occur when irradiating natural palladium with neutrons which have energy values of 15.1, 15.9, and 16.3 MeV. The cross sections were measured relative to a copper monitor which was "sandwitched" in with the palladium target. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131351/
Investigation of the Uniaxial Stress Dependence of the Effective Mass in N-Type InSb Using the Magnetophonon Effect
The magnetophonon effect was used to investigate the uniaxial stress dependence of the effective mass in n-type InSb (indium antimonide). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164537/
A Study of Minority Atomic Ion Recombination in the Helium Afterglow
Electron-ion recombination has been under study for many years, but comparisons between theory and experiment have been very difficult, especially for conditions where the ion under evaluation was a minority in concentration. This study describes a direct measurement of the recombination-rate coefficient for the recombination of minority as well as majority ions in the afterglow. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164590/
Gamma Ray Distribution from Neutron Excitation in Cesium
The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the gamma rays resulting from excitation of Cs133 by the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons and to determine the relative intensity of each gamma ray. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163933/
Gamma Rays Resulting from Neutron Scattering in Cesium
The purpose of this investigation was to attempt to resolve the energy levels of Cs133 that can be excited by inelastic scattering of 14 Mev neutrons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163901/
A Study of the Celestial Gamma-ray Flux
This thesis is a study of the celestial gamma-ray flux. It reviews several of the proposed mechanisms for producing high energy gamma rays and describes several of the attempts to detect their presence. Also included is a short historical review of the spark chamber, along with a qualitative description of its operation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163905/
The Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Susceptibility of Galvinoxyl
The twofold purpose of this investigation was to design and construct an apparatus for direct magnetic susceptibility measurements as a function of temperature and to provide the complete susceptibility characterization of the free radical galvinoxyl in the room temperature-liquid nitrogen range. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163921/
The Dielectric Constant of Galvinoxyl
The molecules in many substances are know to undergo at characteristic temperatures a change in their rotational freedom in the solid state, signifying either a change in structure of the material of the onset of limited rotation of the molecule about some symmetry axis. The purpose of this research was to determine from dielectric constant measurements over the 100°K-420°K temperature range whether or not the organic free radical galvinoxyl and its diamagnetic parent molecule, dihydroxydiphenylmethane, undergo any such transitions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163926/
Microwave Cavity Method for Measuring Plasma Properties
This discussion is concerned primarily with communications blackout during spacecraft entry into a planetary atmosphere. The gas in the shock layer, between shock wave and vehicle surface, ionizes from the intense heating which takes place in the bow shock wave and a viscous region of high gas enthalpy. This ionization may persist throughout the subsequent flow over the vehicle and into the wake, thus completely engulfing the vehicle and its communications elements. The problem will be to simulate a plasma model that will be of interest for hypervelocity reentry vehicles and to provide meaningful expressions for the various plasma parameters of interest (electron density, electron temperature, collision frequency, etc.) in terms of the microwave measurables (amplitude, phase shifts, frequency shifts, polarization, etc.) digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163950/
Size Dependence in the Electrical Conductivity of Bismuth
In the present investigation, measurements were made at liquid-helium temperatures on single-crystal bismuth samples which had a stair-step geometry in order to study several thicknesses during one helium run. These samples were also thinned to extend the thickness range of the steps to a thinner region. In addition J.E. Parrott's theory is extended to include a diagonal anisotropic relaxation-time tensor and the effect of holes on the size effect. A discussion of the theory of Parrott, and the extension of Parrott's theory in connection with the experimental results is presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131132/
Measurement of the Atomic-oxygen Concentration under Simulated Upper Atmosphere Conditions
This thesis describes an experimental technique for measuring the atomic-oxygen concentration under simulated upper atmosphere conditions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131196/
Recombination Rate Coefficient Measurements in the Helium Afterglow
This thesis describes a method of determining the recombination rate coefficient experimentally, which does not depend on a specific model of the recombination process. With this method established, results are presented for the recombination rate coefficient measurements at 44.6 Torr. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131182/
Application of the Wigner Formalism to a Slightly Relativistic Quantum Plasma
A slightly relativistic fermion gas is described by the dynamical theory obtained from the Wigner distribution function. The problem is approached in a self-consistent manner including the two-body Darwin Hamiltonian. The goal is to find the departures from equilibrium and dispersion relations for wave propagation in the gas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130850/
Gurevich Magnetomorphic Oscillations in Single Crystals of Aluminum at Helium Temperatures
The Sondheimer theory was tested by looking for oscillatory phenomena in a group of single crystals representing a range in dimensions from matchbox geometry to thin-film geometry. The single crystals were identical with respect to impurity content, strain, orientation, surface condition, and probe placement. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130866/
On Chaos and Anomalous Diffusion in Classical and Quantum Mechanical Systems
The phenomenon of dynamically induced anomalous diffusion is both the classical and quantum kicked rotor is investigated in this dissertation. We discuss the capability of the quantum mechanical version of the system to reproduce for extended periods the corresponding classical chaotic behavior. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278244/
Steady-state and Dynamic Probe Characteristics in a Low-density Plasma
The problem with which this investigation is concerned is that of determining the steady-state and dynamic characteristics of the admittance of a metallic probe immersed in a laboratory plasma which has the low electron densities and low electron temperatures characteristic of the ionospheric plasma. The problem is separated into three related topics: the design and production of the laboratory plasma, the measurement of the steady-state properties of dc and very low frequency probe admittance, and the study of transient ion sheath effects on radio frequency probe admittance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278232/
Evolution of Vacancy Supersaturations in MeV Si Implanted Silicon
High-energy Si implantation into silicon creates a net defect distribution that is characterized by an excess of interstitials near the projected range and a simultaneous excess of vacancies closer to the surface. This defect distribution is due to the spatial separation between the distributions of interstitials and vacancies created by the forward momentum transferred from the implanted ion to the lattice atom. This dissertation investigates the evolution of the near-surface vacancy excess in MeV Si-implanted silicon both during implantation and post-implant annealing. Although previous investigations have identified a vacancy excess in MeV-implanted silicon, the investigations presented in this dissertation are unique in that they are designed to correlate the free-vacancy supersaturation with the vacancies in clusters. Free-vacancy (and interstitial) supersaturations were measured with Sb (B) dopant diffusion markers. Vacancies in clusters were profiled by Au labeling; a new technique based on the observation that Au atoms trap in the presence of open-volume defects. The experiments described in this dissertation are also unique in that they were designed to isolate the deep interstitial excess from interacting with the much shallower vacancy excess during post-implant thermal processing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277663/
Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Nonlinear Bioimaging, Cell Detection and Selective Cell Destruction
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Light matter interactions have led to a great part of our current understanding of the universe. When light interacts with matter it affects the properties of both the light and the matter. Visible light, being in the region that the human eye can "see," was one of the first natural phenomenon we used to learn about our universe. The application of fundamental physics research has spilled over into other fields that were traditionally separated from physics, being considered two different sciences. Current physics research has applications in all scientific fields. By taking a more physical approach to problems in fields such as chemistry and biology, we have furthered our knowledge of both. Nanocrystals have many interesting optical properties. Furthermore, the size and properties of nanocrystals has given them applications in materials ranging from solar cells to sunscreens. By understanding and controlling their interactions with systems we can utilize them to increase our knowledge in other fields of science, such as biology. Nanocrystals exhibit optical properties superior to currently used fluorescent dyes. By replacing molecular dyes with nanoparticles we can reduce toxicity, increase resolution and have better cellular targeting abilities. They have also shown to have toxicity to cancer and antibacterial properties. With the understanding of how to target specific cells in vitro as well as in vivo, nanoparticles have the potential to be used as highly cell specific nanodrugs that can aid in the fight against cancer and the more recent fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. This dissertation includes our work on bioimaging as well as our novel drug delivery system. An explanation of toxicity associated with ZnO nanoparticles and how we can use it and the nonlinear optical properties of ZnO for nanodrugs and nanoprobes is presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271908/
Criticality in Cooperative Systems
Cooperative behavior arises from the interactions of single units that globally produce a complex dynamics in which the system acts as a whole. As an archetype I refer to a flock of birds. As a result of cooperation the whole flock gets special abilities that the single individuals would not have if they were alone. This research work led to the discovery that the function of a flock, and more in general, that of cooperative systems, surprisingly rests on the occurrence of organizational collapses. In this study, I used cooperative systems based on self-propelled particle models (the flock models) which have been proved to be virtually equivalent to sociological network models mimicking the decision making processes (the decision making model). The critical region is an intermediate condition between a highly disordered state and a strong ordered one. At criticality the waiting times distribution density between two consecutive collapses shows an inverse power law form with an anomalous statistical behavior. The scientific evidences are based on measures of information theory, correlation in time and space, and fluctuation statistical analysis. In order to prove the benefit for a system to live at criticality, I made a flock system interact with another similar system, and then observe the information transmission for different disturbance values. I proved that at criticality the transfer of information gets the maximal efficiency. As last step, the flock model has been shown that, despite its simplicity, is sufficiently a realistic model as proved via the use of 3D simulations and computer animations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271910/
Ion Beam Synthesis of Carbon Assisted Nanosystems in Silicon Based Substrates
The systematic study of the formation of &#946;-SiC formed by low energy carbon ion (C-)implantation into Si followed by high temperature annealing is presented. The research is performed to explore the optimal annealing conditions. The formation of crystalline &#946;-SiC is clearly observed in the sample annealed at 1100 °C for a period of 1 hr. Quantitative analysis is performed in the formation of &#946;-SiC by the process of implantation of different carbon ion fluences of 1×1017, 2×1017, 5×1017, and 8×1017 atoms /cm2 at an ion energy of 65 keV into Si. It is observed that the average size of &#946;-SiC crystals decreased and the amount of &#946;-SiC crystals increased with the increase in the implanted fluences when the samples were annealed at 1100°C for 1 hr. However, it is observed that the amount of &#946;-SiC linearly increased with the implanted fluences up to 5×1017 atoms /cm2. Above this fluence the amount of &#946;-SiC appears to saturate. The stability of graphitic C-C bonds at 1100°C limits the growth of SiC precipitates in the sample implanted at a fluence of 8×1017 atoms /cm2 which results in the saturation behavior of SiC formation in the present study. Secondly, the carbon cluster formation process in silica and the characterization of formed clusters is presented. Silicon dioxide layers ~500 nm thick are thermally grown on a Si (100) wafer. The SiO2 layers are then implanted with 70 keV carbon ions at a fluence of 5×1017 atoms/cm2. The implanted samples are annealed 1100 °C for different time periods of 10 min., 30 min., 60 min., 90 min., and 120 min., in the mixture of argon and hydrogen gas (96 % Ar + 4% hydrogen). Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals UV to visible emission from the samples. A detail mechanism of the photoluminescence and its possible origin is discussed by correlating the structural and optical properties of the samples. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize the samples. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc68033/
Thorium and Uranium M-shell X-ray Production Cross Sections for 0.4 – 4.0 MeV Protons, 0.4 - 6.0 MeV Helium Ions, 4.5 – 11.3 MeV Carbon Ions, and 4.5 – 13.5 MeV Oxygen Ions.
The M-shell x-ray production cross section for thorium and uranium have been determined for protons of energy 0.4 - 4.0 MeV, helium ions of energy 0.4 - 6.0 MeV, carbon ions of energy 4.5 - 11.3 MeV and oxygen ions of energy 4.5 - 13.5 MeV. The total cross sections and the cross sections for individual x-ray peaks in the spectrum, consisting of the following transitions Mz (M4-N2, M5-N3, M4-N3), Ma (M5-N6,7), Mb (M4-N6, M5-O3, M4- O2), and Mg (M4-O3, M5-P3, M3-N4, M3-N5), were compared to the theoretical values determined from the PWBA + OBKN and ECUSAR. The theoretical values for the carbon and oxygen ions were also modified to take into account the effects of multiple ionizations of the target atom by the heavier ions. It is shown that the results of the ECUSAR theory tend to provide better agreement with the experimental data. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc68032/
Ballistic deposition: global scaling and local time series.
Complexity can emerge from extremely simple rules. A paradigmatic example of this is the model of ballistic deposition (BD), a simple model of sedimentary rock growth. In two separate Problem-in-Lieu-of Thesis studies, BD was investigated numerically in (1+1)-D on a lattice. Both studies are combined in this document. For problem I, the global interface roughening (IR) process was studied in terms of effective scaling exponents for a generalized BD model. The model used incorporates a tunable parameter B to change the cooperation between aggregating particles. Scaling was found to depart increasingly from the predictions of Kardar-Parisi-Zhang theory both with decreasing system sizes and with increasing cooperation. For problem II, the local single column evolution during BD rock growth was studied via statistical analysis of time series. Connections were found between single column time series properties and the global IR process. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4392/
Polymer Gels: Kinetics, Dynamics Studies and Their Applications as Biomaterials
The polymer gels especially hydrogels have a very special structure and useful features such as unusual volume phase transition, compatibility with biological systems, and sensitivity to environmental stimuli (temperature, pH value, electric field, light and more), which lead to many potential applications in physical and biochemical fields. This research includes: (1) the theoretical and experimental studies of polymer gels on swelling kinetics, spinodal decomposition, and solution convection in gel matrix; (2) applications of polymer gels in wound dressing, tissue-simulating optical phantom and gel display. The kinetics of gel swelling has been theoretically analyzed by considering coupled motions of both solvent and polymer network. Analytical solutions of the solvent and the network movement are derived from collective diffusion equations for a long cylindrical and a large disk gel. Kinetics of spinodal decomposition of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) polymer gel is investigated using turbidity and ultrasonic techniques. By probing movement of domains, a possible time-dependent gel structure in the spinodal decomposition region is presented. Theoretical studies of solution convection in gel matrix have been done and more analysis on dimensionless parameters is provided. To enhance the drug uptake and release capacity of silicone rubber (SR), NIPA hydrogel particles have been incorporated into a SR membrane. This SR/NIPA composite gel has promising attributes for wound dressing and other uses. Tissue-simulating optical phantom has been synthesized and studied using NIPA solution trapped inside a hydrogel. Polymer gels with engineered surface patterns were implemented. NIPA gel deposited on the surface of an acrylamide gel can be used as responsive gel display. A dynamically measurement technique of local shear modulus and swelling ratio of gel is presented based on an engineered periodic surface pattern as square array. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4379/
Broad-band Light Emission From Ion Implanted Silicon Nanocrystals Via Plasmonic and Non-plasmonic Effects for Optoelectronics
Broad band light emission ranging from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared (NIR) has been observed from silicon nanoparticles fabricated using low energy (30-45 keV) metal and non-metal ion implantation with a fluence of 5*1015 ions/cm2 in crystalline Si(100). It is found from a systematic study of the annealing carried out at certain temperatures that the spectral characteristics remains unchanged except for the enhancement of light emission intensity due to annealing. The annealing results in nucleation of metal nanoclusters in the vicinity of Si nanoparticles which enhances the emission intensity. Structural and optical characterization demonstrate that the emission originates from both highly localized defect bound excitons at the Si/Sio2 interface, as well as surface and interface traps associated with the increased surface area of the Si nanocrystals. The emission in the UV is due to interband transitions from localized excitonic states at the interface of Si/SiO2 or from the surface of Si nanocrystals. The radiative efficiency of the UV emission from the Si nanoparticles can be modified by the localized surface plasmon (LSP) interaction induced by the nucleation of silver nanoparticles with controlled annealing of the samples. The UV emission from Si nanoclusters are coupled resonantly to the LSP modes. The non-resonant emission can be enhanced by electrostatic-image charge effects. The emission in the UV (~3.3 eV) region can also be significantly enhanced by electrostatic image charge effects induced by Au nanoparticles. The UV emission from Si nanoclusters, in this case, can be coupled without LSP resonance. The recombination of carriers in Si bound excitons is mediated by transverse optical phonons due to the polarization of the surface bound exciton complex. The low energy side of emission spectrum at low temperature is dominated by 1st and 2nd order phonon replicas. Broad band emission ranging from the UV to the NIR wavelength range can be obtained from Ag implanted onto a single silicon substrate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc177255/
Precision measurements of the hyperfine structure in the 23P state of 3He.
The unusually large hyperfine structure splittings in the 23P state of the 3He isotope is measured using electro-optic techniques with high precision laser spectroscopy. Originally designed to probe the fine structure of the 4He atom, this experimental setup along with special modifications I implemented to resolve certain 3He related issues has made possible new high precision hyperfine structure measurements. Discussed are the details of the experimental setup and the modifications, including in depth information necessary to consider while performing these measurements. The results of these hyperfine structure measurements give an order of magnitude improvement in precision over the best previously reported values. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4178/
Oligonucleotide guanosine conjugated to gallium nitride nano-structures for photonics.
In this work, I studied the hybrid system based on self-assembled guanosine crystal (SAGC) conjugated to wide-bandgap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN). Guanosine is one of the four bases of DNA and has the lowest oxidation energy, which favors carrier transport. It also has large dipole moment. Guanosine molecules self-assemble to ribbon-like structure in confined space. GaN surface can have positive or negative polarity depending on whether the surface is Ga- or N-terminated. I studied SAGC in confined space between two electrodes. The current-voltage characteristics can be explained very well with the theory of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structure. I-V curves also show strong rectification effect, which can be explained by the intrinsic polarization along the axis of ribbon-like structure of SAGC. GaN substrate property influences the properties of SAGC. So SAGC has semiconductor properties within the confined space up to 458nm. When the gap distance gets up to 484nm, the structure with guanosine shows resistance characteristics. The photocurrent measurements show that the bandgap of SAGC is about 3.3-3.4eV and affected by substrate properties. The MSM structure based on SAGC can be used as photodetector in UV region. Then I show that the periodic structure based on GaN and SAGC can have photonic bandgaps. The bandgap size and the band edges can be tuned by tuning lattice parameters. Light propagation and emission can be tuned by photonic crystals. So the hybrid photonic crystal can be potentially used to detect guanosine molecules. If guanosine molecules are used as functional linker to other biomolecules which usually absorb or emit light in blue to UV region, the hybrid photonic crystal can also be used to tune the coupling of light source to guanosine molecules, then to other biomolecules. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9065/
Energy Losses of Protons Projected through a Plasma Due to Collisions with Electrons of the Plasma for a Variety of Non-Maxwellian Electron Velocity Distributions
The purpose of this thesis is to study energy losses suffered by protons in traversing a plasma through collision with the electrons of the plasma. For these electrons a variety of non-Maxwellian velocity distributions are assumed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130468/
A Computer Analysis of Complex Gamma-Ray Spectra
The purpose of this investigation was to provide a method for determining the relative intensities of all gamma rays in a particular spectrum, and thereby determine the relative transition probabilities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130612/
Galvanomagnetic Phenomena in Arsenic at Liquid Helium Temperatures
The purpose of this investigation was to study some of the transport effects in a single crystal of arsenic at liquid helium temperatures in a magnetic field up to twenty-four kilogauss. The experimental coefficients determined were the isothermal magnetoresistivity and the isothermal Hall resistivity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130697/
Thermomagnetic Effects in Antimony at 4.2 [degrees]K
The purpose of this investigation was to study the thermoelectric effects in a single crystal of antimony at liquid-helium temperatures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130643/
A Calculation of the Kaon-Neutron Scattering Cross Section
The purpose of this investigation was to study the scattering processes of K+ mesons with neutrons. In order to do such a study one must first make certain basic assumptions about the type of interaction involved and then proceed to calculate physically meaningful qualities which describe the processes. Thus, the problem is this: assuming the validity of Feynman's rules for these strongly interacting particles, calculate the differential and total scattering cross sections for the interaction of scalar K+ mesons and neutrons. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130687/
Analyzing Magnet System for the Electrostatic Accelerator
This thesis describes the design and construction of a linear accelerator, specifically, a positive-ion source, a high voltage supply, an accelerating column, and the necessary associated vacuum system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130409/
Stochastic Mechanical Systems
To understand the phenomena associated with such stochastic processes and to predict, at least qualitatively, the behavior of mechanical systems within environments which are completely random in time, new mechanical tools are necessary. Fortunately, the derivation of these tools does not necessitate a complete departure from existing theories. In fact, they may be considered as an extension of the well-defined theory of the integral transform, in particular, the exponential Fourier integral transform. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130453/
Dynamical Friction Coefficients for Plasmas Exhibiting Non-Spherical Electron Velocity Distributions
This investigation is designed to find the net rate of decrease in the component of velocity parallel to the original direction of motion of a proton moving through an electron gas exhibiting a non-spherical velocity distribution. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130480/
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