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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Decade: 1990-1999
 Degree Discipline: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine
Does Unemployment Become a Major Stressor in the Evolution of Chronic Pain?

Does Unemployment Become a Major Stressor in the Evolution of Chronic Pain?

Date: August 1997
Creator: Rumzek, Harold A.
Description: Pain has been described as the most complex human experience and most frequent reason patients seek medical treatment. Few people fail to experience the pain associated with disease, injury, or medical/surgical procedures. However, the impact of unemployment that results from chronic pain suffering has not been widely researched. To present a comprehensive view of the effect unemployment has upon the chronic pain experience, this study focused upon stress philosophy, chronic pain, employment, and coping effectiveness. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and a Personal Data Questionnaire (PDQ) were administered to 96 persons (four groups of 24 subjects) representing either unemployed or employed and either chronic or non-chronic (acute) pain populations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Women receiving genetic counseling for breast cancer risk: Cancer worry, psychological distress, and risk recall accuracy.

Women receiving genetic counseling for breast cancer risk: Cancer worry, psychological distress, and risk recall accuracy.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 1999
Creator: Wade Walsh, Margo
Description: This follows an earlier study of the same data set, which, through its findings, presented new questions that are investigated in this study. Both studies used a prospective controlled design, wherein women receiving genetic counseling for breast cancer risk were randomized into two groups. Subjects receiving an audiotaped recording of their genetic consultation (tape group) were compared to subjects who also had a genetic consultation but did not receive an audiotaped recording of it (no-tape group). Participants were drawn from attendees at the genetic clinics of two London hospitals and included 115 women with a family history of breast cancer. Cancer worry and psychological distress were assessed before genetic consultation (baseline), and at one- and six-month follow-ups by post. Objective risk was estimated by the geneticist during the consultation, and subjective risk was assessed at one month follow-up. The goals of the current study were to investigate relationships between cancer worry, psychological distress, and recall of genetic risk for breast cancer in a sample of women receiving genetic counseling for breast cancer risk, and to investigate the role sociodemographic variables on cancer worry, psychological distress, or risk recall for these women. Results for this sample of women with a family ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries