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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
 Degree Discipline: Biology
4-Ethoxymethylphenol: a novel phytoestrogen that acts as an agonist for human estrogen receptors.
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Estrogen is the natural agonist of the estrogen receptor (ER). However, certain plant-derived compounds or phytoestrogens have been identified that mimic estrogens and act as agonists and/or antagonists of ERs, depending on subtype and target tissue. Understanding how phytoestrogens interact with ERs, and therefore effect the estrogenic response, may prove beneficial in hormone replacement therapy and in the prevention and treatment of hormone-related diseases. Using Thin Layer Chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and proton nuclear nagnetic resonance (HNMR), I identified 4-ethoxymethylphenol (4EM) found in Maclura pomifera. While most phytoestrogens are heterocyclic compounds, 4EM is a simple phenol that acts as an agonist of ER-alpha and -beta in HeLa and MCF-7 cells. To study the effect of 4EM on ER-alpha and -beta activity, I performed transient transfection assays and showed that 4EM activates ER dependent gene transcription in a dose dependent manner in both ER subtypes. Further, 4EM- mediated transcription in ER-alpha, like estrogen, was enhance in the presense of co-activators, SRC-1 (steroid receptor coactivator-1), CBP (CREB binding proteins), and E6-AP (E6-associated protein) and inhibited by trans-4- hydroxytamoxifen (4HT). I found that 4EM was specific for ER and did not activate transcription of the progesterone receptor in HeLa cells. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3003/
Actinoplanes Philippinensis: Effect of Carbon Sources on Zoospore Production
Actinomycetes are able to utilize a great variety of carbohydrates, like sugar. The particular kind of sugar and its concentration has decisive effect on the growth of microorganisms. The proper nutritional media aids also in the production of spores. Based on this generalization, that the growth and sporulation of microorganisms are greatly influenced by the nature and the concentration of carbohydrates, an attempt has been made to study Actinoplanes philippinensis with respect to this influence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163928/
The Adaptability and Present Status of Andropogon Ischaemum L. in Denton County, Texas
This investigation has been made with reference to the adaptability of Andropogon ischaemum, King Ranch bluestem, to various soils, various slopes, and various erosion conditions in Denton County. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96951/
The adolescent stress response to a naturalistic driving stressor
The proposed study examined the role of anxiety and risk-taking in driving performance in adolescents. In addition to examining the sample as a whole, gender differences were assessed given earlier reports from our laboratory and others indicating that males and females differ with respect to risky behaviors to driving performance and anxiety. Adolescents' subjective and physiological responses to a driving simulator task were assessed. Anxiety was measured via self report and salivary cortisol. Participants provided a baseline saliva sample and 3 post-task samples for cortisol analysis. Subjective anxiety scores were obtained at both baseline and following the driving stressor. Information concerning impulsivity, as well as other psychological constructs was also collected at baseline. Unlike the pilot study, there were no relationships (with or without respect to gender) between salivary cortisol and both self-reported anxiety (state and trait) or impulsively measures for this sample. These results suggest that this group of adolescents may not have been anxious about the driving task. This discrepancy may stem from error introduced by the smaller sample size obtained from the initial findings or to other factors remaining outside the parameters of the current study. The task did, however, induce a slight hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis response indicating some physiological arousal. Males had significantly higher cortisol levels at baseline than females and at time point 3 while approaching significance at time points 2 and 4. Females possessed significantly higher trait anxiety than males and all post task cortisol levels were positively correlated to age while time points 2 and 4 (with time point 3 approaching significance, p=0.09) were inversely correlated with Self Depreciation scores. Additionally, females had Persecutory Ideas scores that were also negatively correlated with cortisol at time points 3 and 4. For both the entire sample and males only, the correlation between post-task cortisol and driving performance was positive and approached significance (p=0.07 and p=0.08, respectively), suggesting that some HPA activation may be facilitative for successful driving task performance. Correlations between driving performance and psychological constructs were explored and discussed with and without respect to gender. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2591/
Advanced Molecular and Microbial Techniques: a Complete Laboratory Notebook
The purpose of this project is to produce a complete and thorough notebook that may be used to supplement laboratory coursework. Its intent is to be used primarily by the students to aid them in understanding background information and the proper laboratory procedures involved in various types of experiments. The laboratory notebook is a summation of all the experiments and procedures used in the six-credit hour Advanced Microbial and Molecular Biology (BIOL 5160) course offered during the summer semester at the University of North Texas. This class is a team taught effort by Professors O'Donovan and Kunz. The course is constructed as an intensive practice exercise to teach the student about gene mutations, biosynthetic pathways, preparation and analysis of plasmid DNA, and many other topics included in the notebook. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278293/
The Age and Rate of Growth of the Black Crappie, Pomoxis Nigro-Maculatus (Le Sueur), and the White Crappie, Pomoxis Annularis Rafinesque, in the Koon Kreek Klub Lakes, Texas
This study is another phase of the overall research program designed to furnish basic information for the management of East Texas lakes and has as its specific purpose the determination of the age and growth characteristics of two valuable species on these waters. The species to be considered are the black crappie, Pomoxis nigro-maculatus (Le Sueur) and the white crappie, Pomoxis annularis Rafinesque. Both species are highly regarded as food fish and have for many years offered recreational outlets for Texas fishermen. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75663/
Age-Dependent Effects Of Chronic GABAA Receptor Blockade In Barrel Cortex
GABAA receptor binding is transiently increased in rat whisker barrels during the second postnatal week, at a time when neurons in the developing rat cortex are vulnerable to excitotoxic effects. To test whether these GABAA receptors might serve to protect neurons from excessive excitatory input, polymer implants containing the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline were placed over barrel cortex for a 4-day period in young (postnatal days 8 - 12) and adult rats. In the cortex of young, but not adult rats, the chronic blockade of GABAA receptors resulted in substantial tissue loss and neuron loss. The greater loss of neurons in young rats supports the hypothesis that a high density of GABAA receptors protects neurons from excessive excitatory input during a sensitive period in development. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2760/
The Age, Growth, and Food Habits of the Lake Dallas White Bass, Lepibema Chrysops (Rafinesque)
This study was made to secure certain new information concerning the food habits and growth of the white bass, Lepibema chrysops (Rafinesque), which is quite generally considered a good game and good fish. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53380/
Age, Growth, and Food Habits of the Largemouthed Black Bass (Micropterus Salmoides) and the Spotted Bass (Micropterus Puctulatus SSP) in North and East Texas Lakes
This study is based on the examinations and analyses of 388 largemouthed black bass (Micropterus salmoides) and 118 spotted black bass (Micropterus puctulatus ssp.) which were collected over a period of three years from 9 lakes in the North-Central and East Texas areas. The results should show the following: (1) the average age of the black bass in each of the nine reservoirs in Texas; (2) the growth rate of the bass in these reservoirs; (3) the feeding habits of the bass in all reservoirs studied; (4) a comparison of the growth rates of the largemouthed and spotted basses; and (5) a comparison of the growth rates of bass from Texas and Oklahoma. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96895/
Aging Is a Determinant in Anoxia Stress Tolerance in Caenorhabditis Elegans
Oxygen availability is critical for survival for most organisms. The nematode, C. elegans, has been useful for studying genetic regulation of anoxia tolerance due to the oxygen deprivation response mechanisms shared with other metazoans. Studies examining long-term anoxia (72h, LTA) tolerance have only been conducted at adult day 1. To investigate the effect of aging on anoxia tolerance wild-type and mutant strains were exposed to LTA between adult day 1 and day 9. Wild-type isolates and daf-16(mu86) (FOXO transcription factor regulated by insulin-signaling) and aak-2(gt33) (catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase) strains were anoxia sensitive at day 1 and displayed increased LTA tolerance with aging correlated with reproductive senescence followed by a decline in survivorhsip through day 9. The daf-2(e1370) (insulin receptor homologue of C. elegans), glp-1(e2141) (a lin-12/Notch receptor) and fog-2(q71) (required for spermatogenesis) strains were LTA-tolerant through day 5. I conclude that aging influences LTA-tolerance in a strain- and age-dependent manner. In addition to being LTA-tolerant the daf-2(e1370) and glp-1(e2141) strains have a longevity phenotype that is suppressed by loss of kri-1 or daf-12. While loss of kri-1 did not suppress the LTA-tolerant phenotype of glp-1(e2141) at day 1 the portion of impaired survivors increased at day 3 and by day 5 tolerance was suppressed. Similarly, when exposed to 4 days of anoxia the glp-1(e2141);daf-12(rh41rh611) double mutant had a reduced survivor rate at all ages analyzed compared to glp-1(e2141) controls. To better understand formation of an anoxia-tolerant physiology I exposed adults to one or more 24h bouts. Recurrent bouts increased LTA tolerance in wild-type hermaphrodites in a dose-dependent manner. Bout-treated daf-16(mu86) animals had increased survival rate compared to controls yet maximum survival remained below age-matched wild-type. Anoxia bouts decreased LTA-tolerance in aak-2(gt33) mutants, indicating the requirement for ATP regulation in establishing an LTA-tolerant phenotype. These data support the idea that anoxia tolerance is multi-factorial and influenced by environment, metabolism, food, reproduction, sex phenotype and likely additional factors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271821/
Altered Leukemogenic Activity by Thyrotropic Treatment of Leukemic Mouse Thymus in Vitro
This investigation was planned to observe if the leukemic thymic tissue in vitro would inactivate TSH and to study the effect that TSH would have on the leukemogenic properties of these cells when transplanted into a high-leukemia strain of mice. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107887/
Anaerobic Organisms in Acute and Chronic Pulmonary Diseases
This study concerns a determination as to whether anaerobic organisms are involved in pulmonary diseases, particularly those of the chronic type. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130447/
An Analysis and Evaluation of the Elementary Science Curricula in the State Universities and Leading Teachers Colleges in the United States
The purpose of this study is to determine the status of elementary science curricula in the different state universities and the leading teachers colleges in the United States. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75584/
Analysis and expression of the cotton gene for the D-12 fatty acid desaturases 2-4 (FAD2-4)
A genomic clone containing a 16.9-kb segment of cotton DNA was found to encompass a D-12 fatty acid desaturases (FAD2-4) gene. The FAD2-4 gene has a single, large intron of 2,780 bp in its 5'-untranslated region, just 12 bp upstream from the ATG initiation codon of the FAD2-4 opening reading frame. A number of prospective promoter elements, including several light-responsive sequences, occur in the 5'-flanking region. The coding region of the gene is 1155 bp with no introns, and would encode a FAD2-4 polypeptide of 384 amino acids. The putative protein had four membrane-spanning helices, hallmarks of an integral membrane protein, and would probably be located in the endoplasmic reticulum. The FAD2-4 gene is indeed a functional gene, since yeast cells transformed with a plasmid containing the coding region of the gene synthesize an appreciable amount of linoleic acid (18:2), not normally made in wild-type yeast cells. The FAD2-4 gene has many structural similarities to the cotton FAD2-3 gene that was also analyzed in this laboratory. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4299/
An Analysis of Distribution Patterns of Amphibians and Reptiles in Texas
The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the distribution of amphibians and reptiles in Texas by means of the methods of Webb and Hagmeier and Stults. An additional graphical analysis was made, including range and range limits which provides a cross-section of faunal change along selected base lines across the state. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131149/
Analysis of Phytoplankton Responses to Water Chemistry Dynamics in a Moderately Eutrophic North Texas Reservoir
Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to explore relationships between measured environmental variables and in situ phytoplankton communities in a moderately eutrophic North Texas Reservoir. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278929/
Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Genome and Identification and Characterization of a Gene Family Encoding Putative EF-Hand Calcium-Binding Proteins
The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei contains a family of antigenically related EF-hand calcium-binding proteins which are called the calflagins. Genomic Southern blots indicated that multiple copies of calflagin genes occur in T brucei. All of the copies were contained in a single 23 kb Xhol-Xhol fragment. Genomic fragments of 2.5 and 1.7 kb were cloned that encoded calflagin sequences. Two new members of the calflagin family were found from genomic clone sequences. The deduced amino acid sequences of the genomic clones showed the calflagin genes were arranged tandemly along the genomic fragments and were similar to previously described calflagins. The calflagin genes were related by two unrelated 3' flanking sequences. An open reading frame that was unrelated to any calflagin was found at the 5' end of the 2.5 kb genomic fragment. Each encoded protein (~24,000u) contained three EF-hand calcium-binding motifs and one degenerate EF-hand motif. In general, variability among the T. brucei calflagins is greater than related proteins in T. lewisii and T. cruzi. This variability results from amino acid substitutions at the amino and carboxy termini, and duplication of internal segments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278592/
Anatomical and Morphological Responses of Cardiospermum Halicacabum L. (Balloon Vine), to Four Levels of Water Availability
C. halicacabum (Sapindaceae) is an invasive plant that is considered a nuisance species in Texas riparian environments. Little is known of the tolerance of C. halicacabum to flooding and drought; however, this information may provide insight into the characteristics that contribute to C. halicacabum purported invasiveness. C. halicacabum seedlings (n = 92) were exposed to one of four levels of water availability (flooded, saturated, intermediate and dry) over six weeks under greenhouse conditions. Plant performance was affected by water availability; however, there was no effect on survivorship. Flooded and saturated plants exhibited morphological adaptations; producing adventitious roots, hypertrophy, and aerenchyma tissue. Morphological measures, anatomical responses, and patterns of biomass allocation all indicate that C. halicacabum is able to survive periodic inundation, perform in saturation, and establish and thrive on the drier end of a moisture gradient. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67974/
Anatomy and Physiology Syllabus for Community Colleges
This syllabus includes both lecture notes and laboratory activities for a two-semester anatomy and physiology community college course. The syllabus is based on a 16-week semester that is comprised of a three-hour lecture section and a one-hour laboratory class each week. Both the lecture course and laboratory are necessary to fulfill the requirement for anatomy and physiology. Laboratory activities coincide with lectures to enhance understanding of each topic by providing visual and hands-on experiments for the concepts learned in the lecture. Laboratory quizzes will be given each week to help students maintain a working knowledge of the material learned in the laboratory. This course is appropriate for the typical anatomy and physiology student and should benefit both students who plan to major in biology and also those who are non-biology majors. Because subject matter in anatomy and physiology is quite difficult, the importance of attendance and good study skills is stressed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2500/
Animal contribution to human medicine
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The use of animal models in research has led to a fierce debate between animal rights activists and scientists. The former claim that little useful information is gained from animal studies and the suffering of animals does not preclude any treatments which may be used to treat human illnesses. Yet, research scientists claim that in vivo animal models are of absolute necessity to developing treatments and cures to disease. To determine the necessity of animal use, one must examine the models currently in research. Have the animal models for disorders such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy given scientists enough information to develop effective treatments? This paper will examine the role of animal subjects in several disease research protocols, as well as the applicability of the research. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5821/
Annual Lipid Cycles in the Lizard Cnemidophorus Tigris
Annual lipid cycles were determined for adult male and female Cnemidophorus tigris collected near El Paso, Texas during 1970-1971. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131545/
Antibacterial Effect of the Oleoresins of One Hundred Common Texas Plants upon Twenty-Five Gram-Negative Mirco-Organisms
This investigation deals with the study of the possible antibiotic effect of oleoresins of one hundred common Texas plants upon twenty-five gram-negative bacterial organisms. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83529/
Antibiocity of the Oleoresins of One Hundred Texas Spermatophytes upon Twenty Gram-Positive Bacterial Organisms
This investigation is concerned with the testing, in vitro, of oleoresins from one hundred higher plants common to North and South Central Texas. The plants used were selected in order to obtain a representative collection which might be of value in future research. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96860/
The Antibiotic Activities of Some Members of the Cactaceae Family
This problem has been concerned with, first, the collection of sixteen species of plants belonging to Cactaceae family; second, the drying of these and the extraction of the oleoresins thereof; third, the determination of the extent to which these substances inhibit the growth of ten gram-positive and ten gram-negative bacterial organisms; and fourth, a determination of the possible utilization of these extracts a prophylactic or chemotherapeutic agents. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc97010/
The Antibiotic Effect of Pigmented Actinomycetes
This thesis attempts, first, to correlate pigmentation of actinomycetes with the degree of antibiocity; second, to establish the most favorable means of producing a rich luxuriant pigmentation in the individual organism studied by enriching favorable media with specific types of proteins and amino acids. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96995/
The Antibiotic Properties of the Oleoresins of Twenty-Five Common Garden Vegetables
The purpose of this problem is to determine the presence and extent of antibiotic materials as found in the oleoresins of a selected group of garden vegetables. The problem has consisted of, first, the collection and preparation of specimens of twenty-five commonly used garden vegetables; second, the extraction of the oleoresins from these; third, the determination of the inhibitory and other effects of these oleoresins against several strains of selected gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; and fourth, the evaluation of the potentialities of these oleoresins with regard to their future use as medicinal prophylactics and therapeutics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96958/
Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacteria Isolated from City Water Distribution Systems
This thesis studies antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria isolated from city water distribution systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108017/
Antibody Adsorption Used in Identification of Similar Streptomyces Species
This investigation involved the production of specific antisera against known International Streptomyces project strains of Streptomyces. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131205/
The Application of Chlorine Dioxide to Tastes and Odors in Water Supplies
This problem was undertaken to determine the potentialities of chlorine dioxide as an algaecide and as an agent for the removal of tastes and odors from fresh water. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107825/
Application of cultured neuronal networks for use as biological sensors in water toxicology and lipid signaling.
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This dissertation research explored the capabilities of neuronal networks grown on substrate integrated microelectrode arrays in vitro to be applied to toxicological research and lipid signaling. Chapter 1 details the effects of chlorine on neuronal network spontaneous electrical activity and pharmacological sensitivity. This study demonstrates that neuronal networks can maintain baseline spontaneous activity, and respond normally to pharmacological manipulations in the present of three times the chlorine present in drinking water. The findings suggest that neuronal networks may be used as biological sensors to monitor the quality of water and the presence of novel toxicants that cannot be detected by conventional sensors. Chapter 2 details the neuromodulatory effects of N-acylethanolamides (NAEs) on the spontaneous electrical activity of neuronal networks. NAEs are a group of lipids that can mimic the effects of marijuana and can be derived from a variety of plant sources including soy lecithin. The most prominent NAEs in soy lecithin, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and linoleoylethanolamide (LEA), were tested individually and were found to significantly inhibit neuronal spiking and bursting activity. These effects were potentiated by a mixture of NAEs as found in a HPLC enriched fraction from soy lecithin. Cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1-R) antagonists and other cannabinoid pathway modulators indicated that the CB1-R was not directly involved in the effects of NAEs, but that enzymatic degradation and cellular uptake were more likely targets. The results demonstrate that neuronal networks may also be a viable platform for the elucidation of biochemical pathways and drug mechanisms of action. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5557/
Application of Fluorescent Antibody Methods for the Enumeration and Identification of Bacilus Cereus
This particular work is proposed as a test of the expedience of using the fluorescent-antibody technique as a method for enumeration and identification of certain strains of B. cereus that have been found to be effective in preventing taste and odor in water supplies resulting from certain Actinomycete blooms. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163949/
Applications of remote sensing and GIS to modeling fire for vegetative restoration in Northern Arizona
An accurate fire model is a useful tool in predicting the behavior of a prescribed fire. Simulation of fire requires an extensive amount of data and can be accomplished best using GIS applications. This paper demonstrates integrative procedures of using of ArcGIS™, ERDAS Imagine™, GPS, and FARSITE© to predict prescribed fire behavior on the Kaibab-Paiute Reservation. ArcGIS was used to create a database incorporating all variables into a common spatial reference system and format for the FARSITE model. ArcGIS Spatial Analyst was then used to select optimal burn sites for simulation. Our predictions will be implemented in future interagency efforts towards vegetative restoration on the reservation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4323/
The aquatic insect communities of Holbrook Creek and Cochetopa Creek in Colorado.
The first objective for this problem in lieu of thesis project was to gather, identify to the lowest practical taxonomic level and organize all available aquatic insects collected from high altitude Colorado aquatic systems during the summers of 1994, 1996, 1998, and 2002 for the University of North Texas Environmental Science Field Course (BIOL 5650). The curated collection will be housed in the Elm Fork Natural History Museum, located at the University of North Texas. The second objective was to provide a summary and discussion of the occurrence and distribution of the aquatic insects collected from Mt. Blanca in 1994, 1996, and 1998 and to create a taxa list of aquatic insects collected from Cochetopa Creek during the summer of 2002. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4381/
Aspartate transcarbamoylase of Aeromonas hydrophila
This study focused on the enzyme, aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from A. hydrophila, a Gram-negative bacterium found in fresh water. The molecular mass of the ATCase holoenzyme from A. hydrophila is 310 kDa. The enzyme is likely composed of 6 catalytic polypeptides of 34 kDa each and 6 regulatory polypeptides of 17 kDa each. The velocity-substrate curve for A. hydrophila ATCase is sigmoidal for both aspartate and carbamoylphosphate. The Km for aspartate was the highest to date for an enteric bacterium at 97.18 mM. The Km for carbamoylphosphate was 1.18 mM. When heated to 60 ºC, the specific activity of the enzyme dropped by more than 50 %. When heated to 100 ºC, the enzyme showed no activity. The enzyme's activity was inhibited by ATP, CTP or UTP. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5840/
Assembly of Pseudomonas putida Aspartate Transcarbamoylase and Possible Roles of the PyrC' Polypeptide in the Folding of the Dodecameric Enzyme
Aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) of Pseudomonas putida consists of two different polypeptides, PyrB and PyrC' (Schurr et al, 1995). The role of the PyrC' and the assembly of PyrB and PyrC' have been studied. The ATCase made in vitro of P.putida PyrB with P.putida PyrC', and of E.coli PyrB with P.putida PyrC ' were generated under two different conditions, denaturation and renaturation, and untreated. It was found that PyrC' plays a role in the enzymatic regulation by ATP, CTP and UTP. In addition to playing a role in substrate binding, the PyrB polypeptide is also involved in effector binding (Kumar et al., manuscript in preparation). The most energetically preferred form of the P.putida WT is a dodecamer with a molecular mass of 480 kDa. The ratio between the PyrB and the PyrC' is 1:1. In studies of nucleotide binding, it was discovered that the P.putida PyrB was phosphorylated by a protein kinase in the cell extract. In the presence of 20 mM EDTA, this phosphorylation was inhibited and the inhibition could be overcome by the addition of divalent cations such as Zn2+ and Mg2+. This result suggested that the phosphorylation reaction required divalent cations. In the CAD complex of eukaryotes, phosphorylations of the CPSase and the linker region between ATCase and DHOase did not occur in the presence of UTP and it was hypothesized (Carrey, 1993) that UTP and phosphorylation(s) regulated the conformational change in the enzyme complex. Therefore, the same idea was approached with P.putida ATCase, where it was found that 1.0 mM UTP inhibited the phosphorylation of PyrB by more than 50%. These results suggested that the regulation of the conformational change of the P.putida ATCase might be similar to that of CAD. Furthermore, peptide mapping for phosphorylation sites was performed on P.putida ATCase WT, WT --11 amino acids and WT --34 amino acids from the N-terminus of the PyrB polypeptide. The results showed that the phosphorylation sites were located on the fragment that contained amino acid number-35 to amino acid number-112 from the N-terminus of the PyrB polypeptide. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278618/
Assessing Effects of an Environmental Education Field Science Program Fostering Responsibility at an Urban Middle School
The study investigated the ability of an extracurricular program to influence environmental responsibility of sixth and seventh graders. The Children's Environmental Attitude and Knowledge Survey (CHEAKS) was evaluated for appropriateness in assessing the worth of this particular environmental education strategy emphasizing water quality fieldwork and technology. CHEAKS is designed with psychometric reliability and validity that may be used in comparing disparate programs. Wilcoxon two sample tests were used to analyze data gathered from two student groups; one participated in an "Enviro-Mentals Club"; the other received no treatment. Analysis showed no significant change in environmental attitudes between groups, but did show significance (p <= 0.05) in environmental knowledge growth. Therefore, the investigated program had marginal success in influencing environmental responsibility. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277772/
Assimilation of Inorganic Nitrogen by Aquatic Actinomycetes
It was the purpose of this investigation to present laboratory data concerning the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen by the aquatic actinomycetes. The strains of aquatic actinomycetes under consideration represented a cross section of those currently under culture at North Texas State University. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108150/
Assimilation of Organic Carbon by Aquatic Actinomycetes
There were two purposes of this investigation: the first was to develop a method for studying spore germination, hyphal growth and mycelial development of the aquatic actinomycetes under the microscope so that the life cycle of this organism could be continuously followed. The second purpose was to determine the rate of carbon utilization from various types of nutritional sources, and to correlate this with the colony development and spore formation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163851/
Attenuation of Escherichia Coli Aspartate Transcarbamoylase Expressed in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Mutant and Wild Type Strains
No apparent repression of pyr gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is observed upon addition of exogenous pyrimidines to the growth medium. Upon introduction of the subcloned Escherichia coli pyrBI genes for aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) into a P. aeruginosa pyrB mutant strain, repression was observed in response to exogenously fed pyrimidine compounds. The results proved that it is possible to bring about changes in pyrimidine nucleotide pool levels and changes in transcriptional regulation of gene expression as a result. Thus, the lack of regulatory control in P. aeruginosa pyr gene expression is not due to an inability to take up and incorporate pyrimidine compounds into metabolic pools, or to an inability of the RNA polymerase to respond to regulatory sequences in the DNA but is probably due to a lack of specific regulatory signals in the promoter of the genes themselves. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279106/
The Autecology of Celtis Laevigata in Flood Plain Forests of Denton County, Texas
This thesis describes the present nature of one facet of some of the flood plain forest stands in Denton County, Texas. The specific purpose was to demonstrate the presence or absence of difference between the Celtis laevigata (commonly known as the hackberry, southern hackberry or sugarberry) populations in stands on Denton Creek and Elm Fork of the Trinity River. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163960/
Autoimmunity of Periodontitis
The purpose of this investigation is to determine if auto-antibodies are demonstrable in inflammatory periodontal disease using methods other than those of Novotny. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108240/
Automated Low-cost Instrument for Measuring Total Column Ozone
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Networks of ground-based and satellite borne instruments to measure ultraviolet (UV) sunlight and total column ozone have greatly contributed to an understanding of increased amounts of UV reaching the surface of the Earth caused by stratospheric ozone depletion. Increased UV radiation has important potential effects on human health, and agricultural and ecological systems. Observations from these networks make it possible to monitor total ozone decreases and to predict ozone recovery trends due to global efforts to curb the use of products releasing chemicals harmful to the ozone layer. Thus, continued and expanded global monitoring of ozone and UV is needed. However, existing automatic stratospheric ozone monitors are complex and expensive instruments. The main objective of this research was the development of a low-cost fully automated total column ozone monitoring instrument which, because of its affordability, will increase the number of instruments available for ground-based observations. The new instrument is based on a high-resolution fiber optic spectrometer, coupled with fiber optics that are precisely aimed by a pan and tilt positioning mechanism and with controlling programs written in commonly available software platforms which run on a personal computer. This project makes use of novel low-cost fiber optic spectrometer technology. A cost advantage is gained over available units by placing one end of the fiber outdoors to collect sunlight and convey it indoors, thereby allowing the spectrometer and computer to be placed in a controlled environment. This reduces the cost of weatherproofing and thermal compensation. Cost savings also result from a simplified sun targeting system, because only a small pan and tilt device is required to aim the lightweight fiber optic ends. Precision sun-targeting algorithms, optical filter selection, and software to derive ozone from spectral measurements by the spectrometer are a major contribution of this project. This system is a flexible platform which may be adapted to study other atmospheric constituents such as sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides, and haze. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5792/
Autoradiographic localization of carbachol-induced second messenger response in the rat spinal cord following inflammation.
This study examined central mechanisms of persistent pain using an autoradiographic technique to localize phosphoinositide hydrolysis (PI) in the rat spinal cord dorsal horn. The lateral half of laminae I-II showed the highest levels of baseline PI turnover and carbachol-stimulated PI turnover in normal animals as well as after inflammation. Inflammation resulted in increased baseline PI turnover in this region of the ipsilateral (76%) and contralateral (65%) dorsal horns. Carbachol increased PI turnover in this region in normal rats (55%) and following inflammation (ipsilateral: 46%, contralateral: 45%). The absolute magnitudes of these increases were 1.85, 2.71, and 2.51 nCi/mg, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate the involvement of PI turnover in neural mechanisms of persistent pain, and provide evidence for the involvement of cholinergic systems in this process. Because spinal cholinergic systems have been reported to be anti-nociceptive, the present results appear to reflect an upregulation of anti-nociceptive activity in response to inflammation. Thus, the spinal cholinergic system may be a regulatory site within the anti-nociceptive pathway, and may provide an attractive target for the development of new therapeutic agents. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3125/
Bacterial Antibiotic Properties of the Oleoresins of Thirty Summer Flowering Spermatophytes
The purpose of this investigation is to add to the present day knowledge concerning the presence of antibiotics in additional members of the spermatophyte group of plants. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83741/
Bacterial challenge in Lumbricus terrestris: A terrestrial invertebrate immunotoxicity model.
A bacterial challenge assay was developed utilizing the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, in order to assess potential immunotoxic effects from exposure to specific polychlorinated biphenyl congeners. Earthworms were inoculated with Aeromonous hydrophila, establishing a 10-day LD50. In vitro assays for effects of PCBs on phagocytosis agreed with mammalian studies, demonstrating potent suppression of phagocytosis by the non-coplanar PCB congener 138 and no suppression by the coplanar congener 126. However, when the effects of the two PCB congeners were evaluated for suppression of resistance to a whole animal infection challenge assay, coplanar PCB 126 decreased the ability of L. terrestris to withstand infection while non-coplanar PCB 138 did not. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3640/
A Bacterial Spectrum of Antibiotic "S"
This thesis is an investigation of Antibiotic "S" with the purpose of determining which organisms it has a marked effect on, the amount required to cause inhibition, its action in blood, and its therapeutic effect and toxicity in laboratory animals. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83589/
Bacterial Survey of Representative Wells of Canyon, Texas, with Special Emphasis on Sanitation
The problem of this thesis consists of a bacterial analysis of twenty-five representative wells within a radius of thirty miles of Canyon, Texas. An attempt has been made to determine the possible presence of the typhoid organism in these wells. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75367/
Bacterial Survey of the Sources of Drinking Water of Trinidad, Texas, with Special Reference to Sanitation
A bacterial analysis of the water from thirty-six sources of consumption by the white population of Trinidad, Henderson County, Texas, was made to determine the potability of each of these in regard to infection from typhoid or related organisms. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75382/
Bacterial Utilization of Volatile Substances Produced by Streptomyces Lavendulae
The purpose of this investigation is to attempt to learn something of the biochemical ecology of volatile substances produced by actinomycetes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130845/
A Bacteriological Survey of a Freshwater Reservoir
In this study organisms that can be subcultured from lake water, using a prescribed procedure, limit, to an extent, the population, or portions of the population, that can be monitored. In essence, what is taking place is that a set of conditions is set forth and a study is made of the bacteria that will grow under these prescribed conditions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130924/
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