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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Decade: 2000-2009
 Year: 2006
 Degree Discipline: Analytical Chemistry
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Electrochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Inorganic Materials from Aqueous Solutions

Electrochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Inorganic Materials from Aqueous Solutions

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Date: December 2006
Creator: Yuan, Qiuhua
Description: The dissertation consists of the following three sections: 1. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. In this work, we deposited HA precursor films from weak basic electrolytic solution (pH= 8-9) via an electrochemical approach; the deposits were changed into crystallite coatings of hydroxyapatite by sintering at specific temperatures (600-800 ºC). The formed coatings were mainly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD patterns show well-defined peaks of HA when sintered under vacuum conditions. FTIR measurements indicate the existence of hydroxyl groups, which were confirmed by the characteristic intensity of the stretching and bending bands at ~3575 and ~630 cm-1, respectively. The SEM shows an adhesive, crack free morphology for the double-layer coating surface of the samples sintered in a vacuum furnace. 2. Silver/polymer/clay nanocomposites. Silver nanoparticles were prepared in layered clay mineral (montmorillonite)/polymer (PVP: poly (vinyl pyrrolidone)) suspension by an electrochemical approach. The silver particles formed in the bulk suspension were stabilized by the PVP and partially exfoliated clay platelets, which acted as protective colloids to prevent coagulation of silver nanoparticles together. The synthesized silver nanoparticles/montmorillonite/PVP composite was characterized and identified by XRD, SEM, and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) measurements. 3. Ce-doped lead ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The synthesis and study of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer network nanoparticle hydrogels.

The synthesis and study of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer network nanoparticle hydrogels.

Date: August 2006
Creator: Crouch, Stephen Wallace
Description: Homogeneous hydrogels made of an interpenetrating network of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) are synthesized by a two-step process; first making PNIPAm hydrogels and then interpenetrating acrylic acid throughout the hydrogel through polymerization. The kinetic growth of the IPN is plotted and an equation is fitted to the data. When diluted to certain concentrations in water, the hydrogels show reversible, inverse thermal gelation at about 34°C. This shows unique application to the medical field, as the transition is just below body temperature. A drug release experiment is performed using high molecular weight dyes, and a phase diagram is created through observation of the purified, concentrated gel at varying concentrations and temperatures.
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Thermodynamics of the Abraham General Solvation Model: Solubility and Partition Aspects

Thermodynamics of the Abraham General Solvation Model: Solubility and Partition Aspects

Date: August 2006
Creator: Stovall, Dawn Michele
Description: Experimental mole fraction solubilities of several carboxylic acids (2-methoxybenzoic acid, 4-methoxybenzoic acid, 4-nitrobenzoic acid, 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzoic acid, 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzoic acid,2-methylbenzoic acid and ibuprofen) and 9-fluorenone, thianthrene and xanthene were measured in a wide range of solvents of varying polarity and hydrogen-bonding characteristics. Results of these measurements were used to calculate gas-to-organic solvent and water-to-organic solvent solubility ratios, which were then substituted into known Abraham process partitioning correlations. The molecular solute descriptors that were obtained as the result of these computations described the measured solubility data to within an average absolute deviation of 0.2 log units. The calculated solute descriptors also enable one to estimate many chemically, biologically and pharmaceutically important properties for the ten solutes studied using published mathematical correlations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries