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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Biological Sciences
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The Stoneflies (Plecoptera) of the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains

The Stoneflies (Plecoptera) of the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains

Date: December 1989
Creator: Poulton, Barry C. (Barry Charles)
Description: Collections of stoneflies (Plecoptera) were made at 603 stream sites from Nov. 1983 - May 1988 in the Ozark-Ouachita Mountain region, in relation to physiographic and vegetational characteristics. Examination of approximately 9000 vials from these collections, supplemented with material from major museums and other collectors, revealed 88 stonefly species in 8 families and 24 genera. Pearson's measure of association (R) showed there was a significant association between species present and each of the tested variables.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Toxicological Characterization of Trinity River Sediments

Toxicological Characterization of Trinity River Sediments

Date: December 1989
Creator: Hall, Jerry F. (Jerry Fowler)
Description: Sediments in the Trinity River were chemically, physically and biologically characterized and assessed for toxicity. Laboratory bioassays were conducted to identify sediments which induced toxic responses in test organisms and to document these responses through time. Metal and organic contaminant concentrations in bottom sediments were measured. Relationships between these concentrations and biological responses observed in laboratory bioassays were determined. Toxicity identification / reduction methods were used to characterize sediment toxicants. Sediment oxygen demand was also measured in resuspended and undisturbed bottom sediments through time. The Background Sediment Chemistry Approach and the Sediment Bioassay Approach were used to assess sediment quality. Sediment toxicity was observed in whole sediment bioassays using Chironomus tentans as the test species. A relationship between sediment contaminant concentration and toxicity was observed in approximately sixty percent of the sediments. Oxygen demand of resuspended sediments was elevated in sediments at two locations on the river. Oxygen demand of undisturbed sediments was elevated at one location on the river. Characterization of sediment toxicants was conducted using EDTA, pH, and carbon treatments and manipulations of the sediments. Aeration tests were also used to evaluate the contribution of volatile organic contaminants to observed toxicity.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Validation of a Coupled Herbicide Fate and Target Plant Species Effects Model

Validation of a Coupled Herbicide Fate and Target Plant Species Effects Model

Date: December 1989
Creator: Clifford, Philip A. (Philip Alan)
Description: A series of experiments provided data to parameterize and validate a coupled herbicide fate and target plant species effects model. This simulation model is currently designed to predict responses of water hyacinth populations to treatments of the dimethylamine formulation of 2,4- dichloro-phenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D -DMA). Experiments investigated 1) the response of water hyacinth to varying exposures of 2,4-D (DMA); 2) the role of water hyacinth density and herbicide interception in treatment effectiveness using 2,4-D (DMA); and 3) the importance of root exposure to obtain control of water hyacinth using 2,4- D (DMA). Results demonstrated the importance of leaf or canopy interception of 2,4-D (DMA) sprays in obtaining control of water hyacinth populations. The critical threshold plant tissue concentration of 2,4-D (DMA) required to elicit maximum mortality (98%) was estimated to be approximately 12 mg 2,4-D per kg water hyacinth tissue (wet weight). Root uptake apparently plays little or no role in the effectiveness of this herbicide for controlling water hyacinth growth. Validation trials illustrated the efficacy of the current model. The model was validated with data from a field operation. This research has provided considerable insight into optimal use of this auxin-type herbicide for control of water hyacinth, a ...
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Isolation, Characterization and Physiological Studies of Cyanide-Utilizing Bacteria

Isolation, Characterization and Physiological Studies of Cyanide-Utilizing Bacteria

Date: December 1991
Creator: Silva Avalos, Juan G. (Juan Guillermo)
Description: Ten bacteria capable of growth on the metal-cyano complex, tetracyanonickelate (II) {K2 [Ni(CN)J } (TCN), supplied as the sole nitrogen source, were isolated. Seven isolates were identified as pseudomonads while the remaining three were classified as Klebsiella species. In addition to TCN, all isolates were able to utilize KCN although it was significantly more toxic. The degradation of TCN was most complete when supplied at growth-limiting concentrations, did not occur when ammonia was present, and resulted in the formation of nickel cyanide [Ni(CN)2] as a degradation product.
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Physiological Ecology, Population Genetic Responses and Assemblage Stability of Fishes in Two Southwestern Intermittent Stream Systems

Physiological Ecology, Population Genetic Responses and Assemblage Stability of Fishes in Two Southwestern Intermittent Stream Systems

Date: December 1991
Creator: Rutledge, Charles Jerry, 1941-
Description: Six sites within the Denton and Hickory Creek watersheds were sampled over three years to assess the impact of seasonal intermittent stream conditions on the ichthyofauna. An integrated approach using field and laboratory techniques was employed to evaluate the responses of the fishes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Physiological Effects of Ascaris Suum Intestinal Microflora on 5-Hydroxytryptamine Level and Binding Sites in the Intestinal Epithelial Cells

Physiological Effects of Ascaris Suum Intestinal Microflora on 5-Hydroxytryptamine Level and Binding Sites in the Intestinal Epithelial Cells

Date: December 1991
Creator: Shahkolahi, Akbar Mohammadpour
Description: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been shown to activate carbohydrate metabolism in adult female Ascaris suum. Serotonin may be either absorbed directly from the environment or synthesized de novo from the absorbed L-tryptophan in adult female A. suum. The enzymes necessary for the synthesis of 5-HT have been identified in both intestine and muscle tissues. The serotonin absorbed from the environment is obtained either from the host's gastrointestinal contents or from the 5-HT producing bacteria in the intestine of A. suum. Numerous 5-HT producing bacteria were identified in the intestinal microflora. The physiological contributions of 5-HT producing bacteria to the 5-HT level, turnover and binding sites in the intestinal tissue of A. suum were investigated.
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Blood Pressure Regulation During Simulated Orthostatism Prior to and Following Endurance Exercise Training

Blood Pressure Regulation During Simulated Orthostatism Prior to and Following Endurance Exercise Training

Date: May 1992
Creator: Stevens, Glen Harold John
Description: Cardiovascular responses and tolerance to an orthostatic stress were examined in eight men before and after eight months of endurance exercise training. Following training, maximal oxygen consumption and blood volume were increased, and resting heart rate reduced. Orthostatic tolerance was reduced following training in all eight subjects. It was concluded that prolonged endurance training decreased orthostatic tolerance and this decrease in tolerance appeared associated with attenuated baroreflex sensitivity and alterations in autonomic balance secondary to an increased parasympathetic tone noted with training.
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Construction of a Cloning Vector Based upon a Rhizobium Plasmid Origin of Replication and its Application to Genetic Engineering of Rhizobium Strains

Construction of a Cloning Vector Based upon a Rhizobium Plasmid Origin of Replication and its Application to Genetic Engineering of Rhizobium Strains

Date: May 1992
Creator: Jeong, Pyengsoo
Description: Rhizobia are Gram-negative, rod-shaped, soil bacteria with the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia as symbiont bacteroids within nodules of leguminous plant roots. Here, resident Rhizobium plasmids were studied as possible sources of components for the construction of a cloning vector for Rhizobium species.
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Enzyme Assays Using Earthworms for Assessing Innate and Nonspecific Immunotoxicity of Xenobiotics

Enzyme Assays Using Earthworms for Assessing Innate and Nonspecific Immunotoxicity of Xenobiotics

Date: May 1992
Creator: Chen, Shing-Chong
Description: Principal objectives of my research were to: (1) report for the first time that coelomocytes are able to reduce NBT dye and confirm the presence of lysozyme-like activity in earthworm; (2) develop a standard methodology for determination of NBT reduction and lysozyme-like activity in earthworms; (3) compare NBT reduction and lysozyme-like activity in earthworms with those of murine and human cells and fluids; and (4) demonstrate the sensitivity of earthworm NBT reduction and lysozyme-like activity as the assays using matrics in refuse-derived fuel fly ash (RDFF) and CuSO4.
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Molecular and Kinetic Characterization of the Aspartate Transcarbamoylase Dihydroorotase Complex in Pseudomonas putida

Molecular and Kinetic Characterization of the Aspartate Transcarbamoylase Dihydroorotase Complex in Pseudomonas putida

Date: May 1992
Creator: Schurr, Michael J. (Michael John)
Description: Aerobic Gram negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas putida were reported to possess class A ATCases and to have a M.W. of 360 kD. The nucleotide sequence of the P. putida pyrBC was determined to answer this question once and for all. The expected regulatory gene was not found. It is shown that the P. putida pyrB gene is overlapped by pyrC by 4 bp. The P.putida pyrB is 1005 bp (335 aa) in length and the pyrC is 1275 bp (425 aa) long. Both of these genes complement E. coli mutants with their respective genotypes. Another finding borne out from the sequence is an effector binding site at the N-terminus of pyrB of P. putIda. The binding site shows that effectors compete with carbamoylphosphate for the active site. In this dissertation, it is shown that the ATCase of P.putida is a trimer of M.W. of 109 kD (3 x 36.4 kD) and that the gene encoding pyrB is overlapped by the pyrC gene which encodes DHOase. It is also shown that the pyrBC encoded enzymes copurify as a dodecameric complex with a M.W. of 484 kD.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries