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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Biological Sciences
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Dielectric Properties of Azotobacter vinelandii in a Microwave Field

Dielectric Properties of Azotobacter vinelandii in a Microwave Field

Date: December 1978
Creator: Hargett, John M.
Description: A resonant frequency cavity was used to determine the dielectric properties of various preparations of Azotobacter vinelandii ATTC 12837. It was found that the bacteria investigated did interact with microwave radiation in the absence of free water. The data presented here indicate that bacteria demonstrate frequency specific dielectric properties. The techniques employed in these experiments may also be used to determine microwave spectra of other species of bacteria in different physiological stages.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Distribution, Abundance, and Food Habits of Larval Fish in a Cooling Reservoir

Distribution, Abundance, and Food Habits of Larval Fish in a Cooling Reservoir

Date: December 1978
Creator: Mitterer, Lana Gayle
Description: Analysis of larval fish collected at four stations in a 330-ha cooling reservoir indicated Dorosoma spp. were most numerous at all stations, followed by Lepomis spp. and Percina Macrolepida. Largest numbers and greatest diversity of larval fish were found at the station least affected by thermal effluent; the mid-lake station provided the smallest numbers and least diversity. The two warmwater stations were intermediate, with similar numbers and diversity. Diversity and abundance of zooplankton between stations were similar to those of fish. The most abundant zooplankter (Bosmina) was generally selected against by Dorosoma, Lepomis and Micropterus spp. larvae except when the larvae were quite small ((10mm). Cyclopoid copepods were most often selected by all larvae.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Evolutionary Genetics of Campostoma anomalum and Campostoma oligolepis

The Evolutionary Genetics of Campostoma anomalum and Campostoma oligolepis

Date: December 1978
Creator: Merritt, Ronald L.
Description: Electrophoretic variation in 12 proteins encoded by 16 loci was analyzed to compare the genetic relationships of 18 natural populations representing two species of stoneroller minnows, Campostoma anomalum and C. oligolepis. Ten of the loci were monomorphic and fixed for the same allele in all populations of both species. One locus, Mdh-2, was found to separate both species. Mean heterozygosity for both species was 0.072. Estimates of levels of inbreeding indicated this phenomenon is operating in C. anomalum to structure the populations genetically. Mean genic identity (I) between the two species was high, 0.887, indicating the taxa are closely related. Nevertheless, data accumulated point to the conclusion that the two species maintain electrophoretic variation in 12 proteins encoded by 16 loci was analyzed to compare the genetic relationships of 18 natural populations representing two species of stoneroller minnows, Campostoma anomalum and C. oligolepis. Ten of the loci were monomorphic and fixed for the same allele in all populations of both species. One locus, Mdh-2, was found to separate both species. Mean heterozygosity for both species was 0.072. Estimates of levels of inbreeding indicated this phenomenon is operating in C. anomalum to structure the populations genetically. Mean genic identity (I) between ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Life History of the Mayfly Isonychia sicca (Walsh) (Ephemeroptera--Siphlonuridae) in an Intermittent Stream in North Central Texas

The Life History of the Mayfly Isonychia sicca (Walsh) (Ephemeroptera--Siphlonuridae) in an Intermittent Stream in North Central Texas

Date: December 1978
Creator: Grant, Peter M., fl. 1978-
Description: The life history of Isonychia sicca (Walsh) was elucidated from samples collected at Clear Creek from Oct. 1976-Jun. 1978, and Elm Fork of the Trinity River from Sept. 1977-Jun. 1978, Denton County, Texas. Adaptations for existence in an intermittent stream were of primary concern. Eggs are capable of diapausing through hot, dry summers and cold, wet or dry winters. Diapause is broken in the fall after rehydration and/or in the spring. I. sicca is usually bivoltine during a Sept.-Jul. wet period. Observations from Elm Fork indicate that emergence continues to Oct. if the stream remains permanent. Considerable overlap occurs between overwintering, spring, and summer populations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Ribavirin on Normal Rat Kidney Cells and Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts Infected with Rous Sarcoma Virus

Effects of Ribavirin on Normal Rat Kidney Cells and Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts Infected with Rous Sarcoma Virus

Date: April 1979
Creator: Jenkins, Frank J.
Description: Ribavirin, a synthetic nucleoside, was found to inhibit the replication of Rous sarcoma viruses (RSV) and subsequent cell transformation in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF). It also blocked the transformation of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells infected with temperature-sensitive mutants of RSV. The action of Ribavirin was found to be reversible as removal of the drug from the NRK cells reversed the effects on cell transformation. Ribavirin appears to have a static effect on cell growth of both NRK and CEF cells. In addition, guanosine, xanthosine and inosine altered the effect of Ribavirin on cell growth.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of an Acute Bout of Near-Maximal Intensity Exercise on the Cardiac Enzymes in Human Sera

Effects of an Acute Bout of Near-Maximal Intensity Exercise on the Cardiac Enzymes in Human Sera

Date: May 1979
Creator: Goheen, Bernadette A.
Description: The Cardiac Profile, a pattern of serum enzyme changes seen within seventy-two hours after an AMI, is diagnostic aid for detecting occurrence of infarcts. The effects of exercise stress on the Cardiac Profile aid clinicians in avoiding diagnostic errors in patients immediately after exercise. Five male volunteers ran from six to ten miles. Serum enzyme levels were monitored serially three days before and five days after stress. Enzyme activity was determined spectrophotometrically and electrophoretically. Significant increases in total CPK and LDH were seen. An LDH 'one-two flip' occurred eight hours after exercise. No MB-CPK was found following the run.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Histochemical Characterization of Lymphocytes in Preleukemic and Leukemic AKR Mice

Histochemical Characterization of Lymphocytes in Preleukemic and Leukemic AKR Mice

Date: May 1979
Creator: Michnoff, Carolyn A.
Description: The AKR strain of mice have a genetic trait for spontaneous development of lymphocytic leukemia. In this study, leukemic mice were found to have significantly larger (p<0.01) thymuses and spleens than preleukemic mice. The enlarged leukemic tissues were densely packed with a light staining cell, with a hollow-appearing nucleus. Tissues from preleukemic mice were observed to be infiltrated with a smaller, darker-staining lymphocyte. Fluorescent antibody staining was done on preleukemic and leukemic tissues, using three antisera against murine lymphocyte theta antigen, and an antiserum against murine IgG. Significantly brighter fluorescence, (p <0.05) with theta-specific antisera, was found in leukemic thymuses,spleens, and kidneys than in the same preleukemic tissues. Leukemic tissues had significantly brighter fluorescence (p <0.05) than preleukemic tissues with IgG antiserum.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effect of Operant Behavior on the Metabolism of 5-Hydroxytryptamine

Effect of Operant Behavior on the Metabolism of 5-Hydroxytryptamine

Date: August 1979
Creator: Shepard, Paul
Description: The role of operant behavior in the metabolism of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) turnover was investigated. Two and one-half hours following the administration of 150 mg/kg of para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a specific inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase, levels of 5-HT were compared in sedentary and performing rats. Whole brain levels of serotonin were reduced in both responding and sedentary animals; however, differences between these groups were not statistically significant. The drug induced decrease in 5-HT levels was accompanied by a significant decrease in session responding. The degree of suppressed responding could be correlated with the level of 5-HT following PCPA, suggesting that the metabolism of serotonin is in part modulated by the rate of responding as maintained by the operant schedule.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Cigarette Residues Affect Steroidogenesis in Cultured Y-1 Mouse Adrenal Tumor Cells

Cigarette Residues Affect Steroidogenesis in Cultured Y-1 Mouse Adrenal Tumor Cells

Date: December 1979
Creator: Morris, Paula D.
Description: This study (1) quantitatively compared steroid production in cultured Y-l mouse adrenal tumor cells exposed to Camel and Carlton-smoke derived residues, and (2) localized the effects in the cell. Basal steroid production was increased by Camel residues but not by Carlton, while ACTH stimulation was interfered with by both residues. Camel basal stimulation was comparable to that of cAMP, and was abolished by Cytochalasin D. The stimulation was also comparable to that of cholera toxin, which activates adenyl cyclase. Results indicate that residue components dissolve in the membrane stimulating adenyl cyclase at a point similar to or before that utilized by cholera toxin for its stimulating effect.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Genic Differentiation Between Two Chromosomal Races of Pocket Gophers, Geomys bursarius

Genic Differentiation Between Two Chromosomal Races of Pocket Gophers, Geomys bursarius

Date: May 1980
Creator: Bohlin, Raymond G.
Description: Genic data from two chromosomal races of Geomys bursarius from a contact zone in central Texas indicated that the two races possessed distinct gene pools which would define them as separate species. Data from proteins encoded from 21 loci in this study substantiated this hypothesis. A pattern of alternately fixed alleles at the ADH-l, MDH-2, LDH-l, and IDH-1 loci with no apparent gene flow in zones of contact strongly suggested that these two races should be designated as separate species. Levels of heterozygosity and high FST values indicate that genomic structuring within Geomys is most heavily influenced by high levels of inbreeding and low migration rates. Fossorial rodents were suggested to undergo speciation primarily through parapatric means.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Eosinophil and Lysophospholipase Responses in Mice Infected with Trichinella spiralis: A Role for the Lymphocyte and Macrophage

The Eosinophil and Lysophospholipase Responses in Mice Infected with Trichinella spiralis: A Role for the Lymphocyte and Macrophage

Date: August 1986
Creator: Adewusi, Iyabode Olukemi, 1958-
Description: The relationship among eosinophils, lysophospholipase activity and the immune response in animals infected with Trichinella spiralis was studied using in vivo and in vitro techniques. In an in vivo experiment, anti-thymocyte serum (ATS) was administered to mice infected with T. spiralis and its effects on intestinal lysophospholipase (EC 3.1.1.5.) activity, peripheral blood, bone marrow and intestinal eosinophilia were measured in the same experimental animal. The ATS caused a significant temporally related suppression of both the tissue lysophospholipase response and eosinophilia, in all three compartments. These findings support the hypothesis that parasite-induced eosinophilia is the cause of the increased lysophospholipase activity of parasitized tissue and that the responses are thymus cell-dependent. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the eosinophil was the primary inflammatory cell source of lysophospholipase among eosinophils, neutrophils macrophages and lymphocytes. The role of other cells and antigen in the production of the enzyme by the eosinophil was also investigated in vitro• Results demonstrated that eosinophils cultured with both T. spiralis antigen and other leukocytes yielded enzyme activities significantly greater than eosinophils cultured alone or with only antigen. More specific experiments showed that T-lymphocytes were the cells responsible for influencing the eosinophils' lysophospholipase activity in the presence of antigen, and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Genetics of Pigmentation in Corynebacterium poinsettiae ATCC 9682

The Genetics of Pigmentation in Corynebacterium poinsettiae ATCC 9682

Date: August 1986
Creator: Campbell, Alan L. (Alan Lee)
Description: Corynebacterium poinsettiae mutant strains blocked in carotenoid biosynthesis were obtained by treatment with the mutagen N-methyl-N1-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Additional carotenoid (Crt) mutant strains were obtained from a previous study conducted in our laboratory. Fifty-nine Crt mutants affected in carotenoid biosynthesis were examined by a normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. Pigment extracts of Crt mutants and C. poinsettiae wild type strains were resolved by an isocratic system with hexane:acetone:dicholoromethane, 11.35:1.73:1.00 (by vol.) as the eluting solvent. In addition to the five major peaks, twelve minor peaks were observed in the wild type C. poinsettiae strain used in this study. Crt mutant and wild type strain peak heights were measured from the individual chromatograms and the peak height data set created was analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System program to perform a cluster analysis. The cluster analysis revealed five carotenoid mutant groups. Carotenoid pigments which accumulated or were absent in each of the cluster groups are reported. Cluster group 1 mutants (CrtA) are blocked in the dehydrogenase(s) which is(are) responsible for the dehydrogenations between phytoene and lycopene. Cluster group 2 mutants (CrtB) appear to be blocked at a second dehydrogenase specific for the dehydrogenation from C.p. 470 to C.p. 496. Cluster ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Radial Compression High Performance Liquid Chromatography as a Tool for The Measurement of Endogenous Nucleotides in Bacteria

Radial Compression High Performance Liquid Chromatography as a Tool for The Measurement of Endogenous Nucleotides in Bacteria

Date: August 1986
Creator: Dutta, Probir Kumar
Description: High performance liquid chromatography was used to measure ribonucleoside triphosphates in microbial samples. Anion exchange columns in a radial compression module were used to separate and quantify purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Endogenous ribonucleoside triphosphates were extracted from Escherichia coli and pseudomonas aeruginosa using three different solvents, namely trifluorocetic acid (TFA; 0.5M), trichloroacetic acid (TCA; 6 per cent w/v) and formic acid (1.0M) Extracts were assayed for uridine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), and guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) by using anion exchange radial compression high performance (pressure) liquid chromatography. The three extraction produres were compared for yield of triphosphates. E. coli, the TFA extraction procedure was more sensitive and reliable than TCA and formic acid extraction procedures, but , in P. aeruginosa, the best yields of ATP and GTP were obrained following extraction with TFA. Yields of UTP and CTP increased when extraction was performed in TCA. These data illustrate that different extraction produres produce different measures for different triphosphates, a point often overlooked.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Analysis of Respiratory Mechanisms Controlling Exercise Hyperpnea During Cycle Ergometry Conducted at Selected Workloads and Pedal Frequencies

An Analysis of Respiratory Mechanisms Controlling Exercise Hyperpnea During Cycle Ergometry Conducted at Selected Workloads and Pedal Frequencies

Date: December 1986
Creator: Wise, Charles Hamilton
Description: Respiratory and metabolic patterns in response to variations in exercise workload (WL) and pedal frequency (RPM) were examined in 10 healthy males. Each subject performed WLs of low (L), moderate (M) and high (H) intensity, equivalent to 25%, 50% and 75% V02 m a x at 7 pedal frequencies (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 RPM). ANOVA ( 3 X 7 design) indicated that WL and RPM had independent and significant effects on all respiratory and metabolic measures; i.e., the greater the WL and RPM, the higher the HR, V02, VC02, Ve, Fb, Vt, Vt/Ti, Vt/Te and Ti/TtQt and the lower the Ti and Te. However, analysis of the interaction effect revealed different response patterns for Fb, Vt, Ti, Vt/Ti, Vt/Te and Ve among the WLs. During L-WL, increases in RPM produced increases in Ve which were due to progressive increases in both Fb and Vt. However, during M-WL and H-WL, increases in RPM produced increases in Ve which were accomplished by a constant Vt and a progressive increase in Fb. My findings suggest that during low WLs, the signal for Vt is dependent on rate of contraction, while during M-WL and H-WL, the signal for Vt appears ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Fitness-Related Alterations in Blood Pressure Control: The Role of the Autonomic Nervous System

Fitness-Related Alterations in Blood Pressure Control: The Role of the Autonomic Nervous System

Date: December 1986
Creator: Smith, Michael Lamar, 1957-
Description: Baroreflex function and cardiovascular responses to lower body negative pressure during selective autonomic blockade were evaluated in endurance exercise trained (ET) and untrained (UT) men. Baroreflex function was evaluated using a progressive intravenous infusion of phenylephrine HCL (PE) to a maximum of 0.12 mg/min. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, cardiac output and forearm blood flow were measured at each infusion rate of PE. The reduction in forearm blood flow and concomitant rise in forearm vascular resistance was the same for each subject group. However, the heart rate decreases per unit increase of systolic or mean blood pressure were significantly (P<.05) less in the ET subjects (0.91 ± 0.30 versus 1.62 ± 0.28 for UT). During progressive lower body negative pressure with no drug intervention, the ET subjects had a significantly (P<.05) greater fall in systolic blood pressure (33.8 ± 4.8 torr versus 16.7 ± 3.9 torr). However, the change in forearm blood flow or resistance was not significantly different between groups. Blockade of parasympathetic receptors with atropine (0.04 mg/kg) eliminated the differences in response to lower body negative pressure. Blockade of cardiac sympathetic receptors with metoprolol (0.02 mg/kg) did not affect the differences observed during the control test. It was ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
New Descriptions, Intraspecific Variation and Systematic Importance of Drumming Behavior in Selected North American Plecoptera

New Descriptions, Intraspecific Variation and Systematic Importance of Drumming Behavior in Selected North American Plecoptera

Date: December 1986
Creator: Maketon, Monchan
Description: Drumming behavior is described for the first time in 33 North American Plecoptera species, and signals of an additional five species, Pteronarcys pictetii, Acroneuria abnormis, Paragnetina media, Clioperla clio and Isogenoides zionensis, are further detailed. An out-group comparison of behavioral characters in all 104 world species whose drumming is known showed that the behavior is more advanced in the Arctoperlaria Group Systellognatha than in the Group Euholognatha. In general, tapping, monophasy, touching, sequenced exchange and less than 50 taps/answer are ancestral states, and rubbing, grouping, phasing, tremulation, interspersed exchange and equal or more than 50 taps/answer are derived states. There has been some co-evolution between abdominal structure and drumming behavior. Scanning Electron Micrographs of 30 species showed that the primitive state of tapping is ascociated with three classes of abdominal structure: (1) absence of derived structures, (2) lobes or vesicles, and (3) hammers. The derived behavior of rubbing, however, occurs only in species with derived structures, and is predominant in species having vesicles and hammers. Drumming can be used as a line of evidence to aid in defining genera and species, since the behavior has a variable degree of specificity or exclusiveness in all species, particularly in groups of species ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Roles of Calcium Ions and Cyclic AMP in Olfactory Transduction

Roles of Calcium Ions and Cyclic AMP in Olfactory Transduction

Date: December 1986
Creator: Winegar, Bruce D. (Bruce David)
Description: The roles of Ca2 + and cAMP in olfactory transduction were explored using agents which affect calcium channels and second messenger systems. These agents were applied at certain calculated final concentrations onto olfactory epithelia of urethane-anesthetized frogs (Sana PiPlens) by two-sec aerosol spray. During extracellular recording, saturated vapors of isoamyl acetate were delivered every 100 sec in 0.3 sec pulses to produce an electroolfactogram (EOG). Inorganic cations that block inward calcium currents inhibit EOG responses with the following rank order: (La3+) > (Zn2+, Cd2+) > (Al3+, Ca2+, Sr2+) > (Co2+). Application of 7.5 mM La3+ eradicates £0G's, while Ba2+ (which can carry more current that Ca2+) initially produces significant enhancement (F=43.04, p<0.001, df=19). Magnesium ion has no effect on EOG's at 7.5 mM, while 1.5 X 10"4M Ca2+ is significantly inhibitory (F=5.74; p=0.0355; df=12). Control aerosol sprays of distilled water depress EOG's by an average of 5%. The organic calcium channel antagonists diltiazem and verapamil inhibit EOG's by 17% and 36X, respectively, at a concentration of 1.5 X 10~*M. Verapamil produces significant inhibition (F=17.17; p=0.002; df=ll) at 1.5 X 10" 5 M, while the 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists, nicardipine and nifedipine, do not inhibit beyond 1% DMSO controls. Several calmodulin ...
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Interaction of Microwaves and Germinating Seeds

Interaction of Microwaves and Germinating Seeds

Date: August 1987
Creator: Shafer, Floyd L. (Floyd Lorenz)
Description: This investigation was concerned with determining the interaction of microwaves with germinating seeds. This study covers two different approaches. The preliminary efforts covered the response of germinating seeds to treatment by microwaves and heat. The second phase of the investigation used microwaves as a probe to determine some of the processes of early seed germination. The preliminary investigation measured the internal metabolic process by ATP production. Leakage of ions and organic material from germinating seeds indicated that membranes are a target of microwaves and heat. Electron photo-micrographs showed an increase in damage to membranes as heat and microwave treatments were increased. The second phase of this investigation was concerned with determining some of the biological activity at the initiation of germination of wheat seeds, Triticum aestivum L., using a resonating microwave cavity oscillating at 9.3 GHz as a probe. Direct current conductivity measurements were also made on the seeds as a means of confirming the observations made with the microwave cavity. There was no observable difference between treatment by UHF or heat in the ultrastructure of germinating seeds. A dielectric response far above that of free water was found as live seeds of wheat began to imbibe water. This effect ...
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Neuropharmacological Characteristics of Tolerance for Cocaine Used as a Discriminative Stimulus

Neuropharmacological Characteristics of Tolerance for Cocaine Used as a Discriminative Stimulus

Date: August 1987
Creator: Wood, Douglas M. (Douglas Michael)
Description: The main purpose of this research was to investigate the phenomenon of tolerance to cocaine. Tolerance is operationally defined as a decreased drug effect due to prior history of drug administration. The animal model that was chosen to investigate tolerance to cocaine was the drug discrimination model, which is an animal analogue of human subjective drug effects. In the drug discrimination procedure, animals are trained to emit one behavior when injected with saline. In the present experiments, rats were trained to press one lever when injected with cocaine, 10 mg/kg, and a different lever when injected with saline for food reinforcement. Once rats are trained, they can accurately detect the cocaine stimulus greater than 95% of the time.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Life History Biology of the Desert Nesting Seagull Larus modestus

Life History Biology of the Desert Nesting Seagull Larus modestus

Date: December 1987
Creator: Guerra Correa, Carlos Guillermo
Description: Gray gulls Larus modestus are unique among birds of northern Chile as the only species nesting in the interior Atacama Desert, and the only seagull nesting far (30 - 100 km) from surface water. During breeding-nesting (August - February) gray gulls congregate on the coast of northern Chile where they feed and initiate courtship. As early as August, breeding pairs commute daily to the inner desert to establish nesting territories, round-trip distances of 60-200 Km. During incubation (30 days) and brooding (7 days) adults alternate daily foraging flights to the coast. Afterwards, both adults forage daily for their chick(s) until fledging (ca. 60 days). Foraging flights and thermoregulatory costs during the period of maximal solar radiation, when ground temperatures may reach 61 C in the day and drop to 2 C at night, have selected for adaptations which minimize those costs: tolerance of hypothermia and hyperthermia; dark plumage; low egg-shell water vapor conductance; low standard metabolic rate; elaborate repertory of thermoregulatory behavior which allow adults to take advantage of microclimatic variations in the desert and minimize costs relative to a sympatric congenor, Larus belcheri scheduling foraging flights to take advantage of optimal atmospheric conditions and presence of forage fish (anchovies) ...
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Physiological Responses of Myriophyllum spicatum to Time Varying Exposures of Diquat, 2,4-D and Copper

Physiological Responses of Myriophyllum spicatum to Time Varying Exposures of Diquat, 2,4-D and Copper

Date: May 1988
Creator: Rocchio, Patricia Mary
Description: The physiological responses of Myriophyllum spicatum to 2,4-D, diquat and copper were quantified using a plant tissue viability assay, and daily measures of dissolved oxygen and pH. Correlations of herbicide tissue residues to physiological response measures were determined and the relationship was used to develop exposure-response models. Diquat and copper had a greater effect on plant tissue viability than was observed for 2,4-D. Diquat produced greater reductions in dissolved oxygen concentrations and pH values than 2,4-D or copper. Copper exposure had the least effect on these parameters. Exposure-response models developed for 2,4-D predicted effective control at plant tissue residues ranging from 4000 to 4700 mg/kg. Aqueous exposure concentrations necessary to produce effective control plant tissue residues ranged from 0.20 to 0.40 mg/L. Exposure-response models developed for diquat predicted effective control at plant tissue residues ranging from 225 to 280 mg/kg. Aqueous exposure concentrations necessary to produce effective control plant tissue residues ranged from 0.113 to 0.169 mg/L. Exposure-response models developed for copper predicted effective control at plant tissue residues ranging from 680 to 790 mg/kg. Aqueous exposure concentrations necessary to produce effective control plant tissue residues ranged from 0.32 to 0.64 mg/L. Model predictions for 2,4-D, diquat and copper were ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Pre-Impoundment Estimations of Nutrient Loading to Ray Roberts Lake and Prediction of Post-Inundation Trophic Status

Pre-Impoundment Estimations of Nutrient Loading to Ray Roberts Lake and Prediction of Post-Inundation Trophic Status

Date: May 1988
Creator: Pillard, David Alan, 1958-
Description: Excessive nutrient loading of natural and artificial lakes has led, in some systems, to plethoric algal and aquatic macrophyte growth which can result in aesthetic degradation and undesirable tastes and odors. It would be advantageous to have some indication of the potential trophic status of a reservoir before it is filled. An objective of this study was to assess the water quality and nutrient loading potential of the tributaries entering Ray Roberts Lake, a large reservoir located in north central Texas. Samples from a maximum of thirteen sites were collected on the Elm Fork, Trinity River, Isle duBois Creek, and five additional tributaries. Data were also collected during six storms, from atmospheric deposition collectors, and from soil-water microcosms. The relationship between watershed landuse and mean water nutrient concentrations was evaluated. Significant differences will exist between the two major arms of Ray Roberts Lake: Elm Fork, Trinity River and Isle duBois Creek. While the majority of the annual phosphorus and nitrogen load entering both tributaries is coming from overland flow, the proportion is higher in Isle duBois Creek. Point sources in the Elm Fork contribute a larger percentage of the bioavailable phosphorus, which is significantly greater than in Isle duBois Creek. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Life Histories Behavior and Space Partitioning in Selected Species of Western North American Plecoptera

Life Histories Behavior and Space Partitioning in Selected Species of Western North American Plecoptera

Date: August 1988
Creator: Hassage, Rodney Lynn, 1947-
Description: Five species of stoneflies (Zapada haysi, Plumiperla diversa, Taenionema pacificum, Isoperla petersoni, Arcynopteryx compacta) from the North Slope and Interior of Alaska were examined for seasonal patterns of emergence of adults and growth of nymphs. Generally growth was retarded during the winter in this region, and all species except I. petersoni completed growth prior to January. The life cycles of six stonefly species (Prostoia besametsa, Triznaka signata, Sweltsa coloradensis. Isoperla fulva, Skwala parallela, Claassenia sabulosa) are described from northern New Mexico. In this region growth was generally less retarded during the winter than in Alaska; P. besametsa completed all nymphal growth during late fall and winter. Drumming behavior of a Colorado population of Pteronarcella badia was described using an evolutionary framework to explain the maintenance of signal variation in this species. Laboratory experiments were used to explore the effect of intraspecific and interspecific interactions on spatial partitioning in P. badia and Claassenia sabulosa. P. badia exhibited clumping and distributed itself as the surface area of substrate in low densities; however, in the presence of C. sabulosa its distribution was random and different from available surface area. A field study was used to examine spatial partitioning by three New Mexico stonefly ...
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Multivariate Analyses of Amphibian and Reptilian Distribution in Texas

Multivariate Analyses of Amphibian and Reptilian Distribution in Texas

Date: August 1988
Creator: Ward, Rocky
Description: Presence-absence data for amphibians, chelonians, saurians, ophidians, and the terrestrial and aquatic ecological guilds of reptilians were analyzed using multivariate analyses. Geographically consistant distributional patterns were found for all faunal groupings. The correspondence between analyses of the different taxa and guilds was not perfect, but similarities were found. All analyses agreed on the presence of a distinctive region in east Texas. Most analyses also agreed on the presence of distinctive regions in south Texas, the Trans-Pecos, the Edwards Plateau, and north-west Texas. There is strong correspondence between interpretations of the analyses based on the amphibian, saurian, ophidian, and terrestrial reptilian distributions, and the biotic provinces produced by earlier, subjective analyses. The Edwards Plateau and a region on the western periphery of east Texas were found to be transitional between other, more faunally distinctive areas for most fauna! groups. Detailed examination of these regions suggested they are best described as clinal in nature. The environmental variables which were most effective in explaining patterns in the distribution of the various taxa and guilds were related to precipitation. However, variations in temperature and physiography were also important predictors of distribution for several of the groups. The distributions of soil and vegetation associations were ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries