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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Biological Sciences
 Degree Discipline: Microbiology
 Degree Level: Master's
Adherence and haemagglutination of  Moraxella catarrhalis.

Adherence and haemagglutination of Moraxella catarrhalis.

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Date: August 2000
Creator: Kosterman, Edward, III
Description: M. catarrhalis is a gram-negative diplococci frequently associated with infections of the upper respiratory tract. During the past decade, some preliminary studies have attempted to elucidate mechanisms of adherence and haemagglutination of M. catarrhalis. These studies have reported, in many cases, inconsistent results. There are two purposes of this research. First, identify mechanisms that may potentially be associated with the adherence and haemagglutination of M. catarrhalis. Second, suggest research directions that may be fruitful in clarifying these mechanisms.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Requirements for cell-free cyanide oxidation by Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764

Requirements for cell-free cyanide oxidation by Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764

Date: August 2000
Creator: Parab, Preeti
Description: The involvement of cyanide oxygenase in the metabolism of pyruvate and a-ketoglutarate-cyanohydrin was investigated and shown to occur indirectly by the consumption of free cyanide arising from the cyanohydrins via chemical dissociation. Thus, free cyanide remains the substrate, for which the enzyme displays a remarkably high affinity (Kmapp,4 mM). A model for cyanide utilization is therefore envisioned in which the substrate is initially detoxified by complexation to an appropriate ligand followed by enzymatic oxidation of cyanide arising at sublethal levels via chemical dissociation. Putative cyanide oxygenase in cell extracts consumed both oxygen and NADH in equimolar proportions during cyanide conversion to CO2 and NH3 and existed separately from an unknown heat-stable species responsible for the nonenzymatic cyanide-catalyzed consumption of oxygen. Evidence of cyanide inhibition and nonlinear kinetics between enzyme activity and protein concentration point to a complex mechanism of enzymatic substrate conversion.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Scientific Considerations of Olestra as a Fat Substitute

Scientific Considerations of Olestra as a Fat Substitute

Date: December 1999
Creator: Rattagool, Kullakan
Description: Olestra is, a sucrose polyester, a noncaloric fat substitute, made from sucrose and several fatty acid esters. It has been approved by the FDA as a food additive used in preparing low-fat deep-frying foods such as savory snacks. Available literature on olestra was evaluated that had both positive and negative connotations. Clinical trials in numerous species of animals including humans were conducted to determine if olestra would affect the utilization and absorption of macro- and micronutrients; the effects of olestra on growth, reproduction, or its toxicity were also examined. The roles of olestra as a fat substitute, how it could effect on humans and the environment, and the potential impacts from its use in large amounts were assessed. Olestra can be removed from the environment by aerobic bacteria and fungi which may be isolated from activated sludge and soils.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries