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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: College of Music
 Decade: 1990-1999
 Month: May
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Applications of Reductive Analytical Techniques in the Phrygian Settings of the Orgelbüchlein by J.S. Bach

Applications of Reductive Analytical Techniques in the Phrygian Settings of the Orgelbüchlein by J.S. Bach

Date: May 1995
Creator: Leite, Zilei de Oliveira
Description: This study aims to two problematic aspects of the Phrygian mode: a. the development of a harmonic pattern at the cadence that differs from that of the other modes and of the major and minor modes as well; b. the observation that the Phrygian scale inverts all of the intervallic properties of the Major scale. The result of these two observations is that when the reductive techniques of Heinrich Schenker are applied in the Phrygian repertory, melodic and harmonic properties are brought into conflict with each other. However, application of alternative models of the Ursatz developed by Lori Burns has certain benefits for demonstrating musical properties in the Phrygian repertory.
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Aspects of Performance in Three Works for Piano and Tape : Larry Austin's Sonata Concertante, Thomas Clark's Peninsula, and Phil Winsor's Passages

Aspects of Performance in Three Works for Piano and Tape : Larry Austin's Sonata Concertante, Thomas Clark's Peninsula, and Phil Winsor's Passages

Date: May 1993
Creator: Brandenburg, Octavia
Description: This dissertation primarily concerns performance aspects in compositions for piano and tape, using three specific works as the basis for discussion: Larry Austin's Sonata Concertante, Thomas Clark's Peninsula, and Phil Winsor's Passages. These compositions are representative of the medium as a whole, yet each offers its own unique set of performance problems.
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I, Blavatsky: A One-Act Opera

I, Blavatsky: A One-Act Opera

Date: May 1990
Creator: Cooper, Steve, 1951 Dec. 4-
Description: I, Blavatsky is a one-act opera based on the life of Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, a nineteenth-century Russian princess and co-founder of a religious organization called the Theosophical Society. The libretto, by the composer, involves a cast of three principal soloists and minor roles for six more singers who are also participants in a small chorus. The text format features free verse alternating with regular, rhymed strophes. Accompaniment is provided by a piano. Melodic structure combines some nineteenth-century Romantic idioms with twentieth-century style. Most of the melodic and harmonic material was intuitively composed to express the text. Rhythmic and stylistic contrasts are accomplished in the representation of the extensive travels of the main character. Stage directions involve a stylized set, several scenes requiring minimal set changes, magical effects to represent that facet of Blavatsky's life, and onstage costume changes for several characters. Approximate duration is one hour.
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Boulez's Sonatine and the Genesis of His Twelve-tone Practice

Boulez's Sonatine and the Genesis of His Twelve-tone Practice

Date: May 1998
Creator: Chang, Sangtae
Description: This dissertation proposes that the Sonatine broadly unfolds a kinetic structure that stems from the traditional tension-relief model and, consequently, its dependence on tradition proves much deeper than Boulez would acknowledge.
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Cadential Syntax and Mode in the Sixteenth-Century Motet: a Theory of Compositional Process and Structure from Gallus Dressler's Praecepta Musicae Poeticae

Cadential Syntax and Mode in the Sixteenth-Century Motet: a Theory of Compositional Process and Structure from Gallus Dressler's Praecepta Musicae Poeticae

Date: May 1996
Creator: Hamrick, David (David Russell)
Description: Though cadences have long been recognized as an aspect of modality, Gallus Dressler's treatise Praecepta musicae poeticae (1563) offers a new understanding of their relationship to mode and structure. Dressler's comments suggest that the cadences in the exordium and at articulations of the text are "principal" to the mode, shaping the tonal structure of the work. First, it is necessary to determine which cadences indicate which modes. A survey of sixteenth-century theorists uncovered a striking difference between Pietro Aron and his followers and many lesser-known theorists, including Dressier. The latter held that the repercussae of each mode were "principal cadences," contrary to Aron's expansive lists. Dressler's syntactical theory of cadence usage was tested by examining seventeen motets by Dressler and seventy-two motets by various early sixteenth-century composers. In approximately three-fourths of the motets in each group, cadences appeared on only two different pitches (with only infrequent exceptions) in their exordia and at text articulations. These pairs are the principal cadences of Dressler's list, and identify the mode of the motets. Observations and conclusions are offered regarding the ambiguities of individual modes, and the cadence-tone usage of individual composers.
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Cyril Scott's Piano Sonata, Op. 66: A Study of His Innovative Musical Language, With Three Recitals of Selected Works by Mozart, Schumann, Scriabin, Debussy, Ravel and Others

Cyril Scott's Piano Sonata, Op. 66: A Study of His Innovative Musical Language, With Three Recitals of Selected Works by Mozart, Schumann, Scriabin, Debussy, Ravel and Others

Date: May 1995
Creator: Cheung, Ching-Loh
Description: The objective of the dissertation is to examine Cyril Scott's musical language as exhibited in his Piano Sonata, Op. 66. Subjects of discussion include Scott's use of form, rhythm, melody, tonality, and harmony. Also included are a biographical sketch of the composer and his philosophical view of modernism. A comparison of the original version and the revised edition of this sonata, as well as references to Cyril Scott's two other piano sonatas are also included during the examination of his harmonic and rhythmic style.
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A Different Drummer: A Chamber Opera

A Different Drummer: A Chamber Opera

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Date: May 1999
Creator: Friedman, Arnold Jacob
Description: A Different Drummer is a chamber opera adaptation of Donald Davis's story "A Different Drummer" from his collection Listening for the Crack of Dawn, published by August House. The opera lasts about seventy minutes, and calls for a cast of three and an orchestra of sixteen players. It contains a prologue, epilogue and four scenes in a single act. The score is prefaced by a paper describing the musical strategies employed in setting the story as an opera. Three chapters describe the adaptation from short story to opera, the essential musical elements, and details of the application of the musical elements in each scene of the opera. The libretto is presented in the fourth chapter.
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The Dramatic Aspects of Thea Musgrave's Narcissus for Solo Flute and Digital Delay (1987) : With Three Recitals of Selected Works by Bach, Feld, Debussy, Persichetti, Berio, Varese, Mozart, Roussel, and Others

The Dramatic Aspects of Thea Musgrave's Narcissus for Solo Flute and Digital Delay (1987) : With Three Recitals of Selected Works by Bach, Feld, Debussy, Persichetti, Berio, Varese, Mozart, Roussel, and Others

Date: May 1996
Creator: Boyd, Diane, 1967-
Description: An examination of the compositional style, subject matter, and use of technology as found in Thea Musgrave's 1987 composition Narcissus for solo flute and digital delay. Includes a short history of Musgrave's formal training, an overview of her creative output, and a discussion of the evolution of her compositional style from her studies with Boulanger in Paris to the present with special emphasis on her dramatic-abstract concept and her forays into post-modernism. Provides insight into Musgrave's choice of mythological text, the literary basis of the Narcissus legend, and its impact on Western thought. Identification of principal motifs, discussion of harmonic implications, melodic language, and optional intermedia effects; and explanation of the electronic effects used within the work. Detailed analysis of the motifs, their electronic manipulations, and how they represent aurally the characters of the Narcissus myth. Listing of Musgrave's works with flute or piccolo in a primary role, details of her transcription of Narcissus for solo clarinet, and diagrams of digital delay controls and stage setting follow as appendices.
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Form and tonality as elements of neoclassical style in two works by Jean Francaix: Divertimento pour flute et piano (1955) and Suite pour flute seule (1963) with three recitals of selected works of Mozart, Widor, Feld, Muczynski and others

Form and tonality as elements of neoclassical style in two works by Jean Francaix: Divertimento pour flute et piano (1955) and Suite pour flute seule (1963) with three recitals of selected works of Mozart, Widor, Feld, Muczynski and others

Date: May 1996
Creator: Ruppe, Elizabeth Ambler
Description: The music of Jean Francaix is well known to those familiar with woodwind chamber literature. His long, successful career began in the 1930s when French composers rejected the excessively chromatic harmonies, intense emotionalism and grandiose proportions of late Romantic music. Embracing the concepts of neoclassicism, economy of means, clarity and objectivity, and a return to diatonicism and formal structures, the new "Classical" music contained the added spice of twentieth-century harmonic techniques including bitonality, modality, and quartal and quintal harmonies. Francaix has written many concertos and solos for woodwind instruments, but his enduring popularity resides in his chamber music for various combinations. His publisher for the last six decades has been B. Schott's Sohne who commissioned Francaix to write several chamber works in honor of his eightieth birthday. Two of his works for flute, Divertimento pour flute et piano and Suite pour flute seule, are known to professional flutists but not considered standards in the flute repertoire. The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the wide variety of Francaix's repertoire which is eminently suitable for concert and recital programming. The identification of formal and tonal elements in Francaix's two works for flute helps to place his prodigious output ...
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Harmonic and Contrapuntal Techniques in the Late Keyboard Works of Cesar Franck

Harmonic and Contrapuntal Techniques in the Late Keyboard Works of Cesar Franck

Date: May 1992
Creator: Cranford, Dennis R. (Dennis Ray)
Description: This study examines the five late keyboard works of Cesar Franck: the Prelude, Chorale, and Fugue and the Prelude. Aria, and Finale for piano, and the three organ chorales. The study focuses on harmonic and contrapuntal techniques and their interrelationships, placing the discussion in the context of an analysis of the whole piece. The primary goal is to identify the salient characteristics of each piece; a secondary goal is to identify common harmonic and contrapuntal aspects of Franck's style.
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The Harpsichord Concertos of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, W.F. Bach, D. Scarlatti, F. Couperin, J.J. Froberger, G. Ligeti, W. Byrd, and Others

The Harpsichord Concertos of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, W.F. Bach, D. Scarlatti, F. Couperin, J.J. Froberger, G. Ligeti, W. Byrd, and Others

Date: May 1995
Creator: Hunt, Janet Evelyn
Description: The harpsichord concertos of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (1710-1784) have suffered undeserved neglect. The four authenticated solo concertos remain in manuscript, with the result that his contribution to the history of the keyboard concerto has been largely overlooked. This study begins to correct this situation by examining these four concertos--F41 in D Major, F43 in E Minor, F44 in F Major, and F45 in A Minor--as well as the published two-harpsichord Concerto in E-Flat Major, F46, and the incomplete Concerto in E-Flat Major, F42 in order to assess W. F. Bach's contribution to the keyboard concerto following its origins in the early 1700s. The results of this investigation show that W. F. Bach took the early keyboard concerto of his father's generation and added many of the characteristics which became associated with the mid-eighteenth century concerto. Friedemann retained the polyphonic interplay between tutti and solo, harmonic language, and tonal plan of his father's compositions and added a wealth of rhythmic ideas and a more modern melodic style. He worked within an established four ritornello/three solo plan for the outer movements, but employed a variety of formal plans for the middle movements. Friedemann heightened the contrast between the solo and the orchestra ...
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A Historical Survey of Woodwind Doubling and A Form/Style Analysis of Four Works for Doubler and Wind Ensemble, a Lecture Recital together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by W.A. Mozart. A. Glazounov. P. Tate. A. Szalowski. A. Copland and Others

A Historical Survey of Woodwind Doubling and A Form/Style Analysis of Four Works for Doubler and Wind Ensemble, a Lecture Recital together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by W.A. Mozart. A. Glazounov. P. Tate. A. Szalowski. A. Copland and Others

Date: May 1993
Creator: Thompson, Phil A.
Description: Four works are selected to demonstrate the stature and demands of this craft and to represent a pinnacle in the art of contemporary woodwind doubling. Concerto for Doubles, by Thomas Filas, Concerto Tri-Chroma. by Michael Kibbe, Rhapsody Nova, by Clare Fischer and Suite for Solo Flute. Clarinet and Alto Saxophone by Claude Smith all represent rare, major solo works written specifically for three individual woodwind doublers. The paper will begin with a history of the practice of woodwind doubling from the fifteenth century to the present. The four works will then be examined by considering form, style and related performance practices.
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An Investigation of Personal Investment Levels Among Nonmusic Major Piano Students Using Portfolio Assessment

An Investigation of Personal Investment Levels Among Nonmusic Major Piano Students Using Portfolio Assessment

Date: May 1998
Creator: Heisler, Paul K.
Description: The purpose of this study was to compare personal investment levels among nonmusic major piano students in the contexts of portfolio and teacher-directed assessment. Three problems were addressed: 1) identifying students' perceptions of direction, persistence, continuing motivation, intensity, and performance in the context of teacher-directed goal setting, choice of instructional activities, and evaluation of performance; 2) identifying students' perceptions of the five personal investment behaviors in the context of portfolio assessment; and 3) comparing student perceptions as identified in problems one and two.
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Jean Millet's L'Art de bien Chanter (1666): a Translation and Study

Jean Millet's L'Art de bien Chanter (1666): a Translation and Study

Date: May 1998
Creator: Thomas, Barbara E. (Barbara Elaine)
Description: Jean Millet's L Art de bien chanter (1666), describes the air de cour and its ornamentation as it existed in France during the first half of the seventeenth century. This work, translated for the first time into English and transcribed into modern notation, and B6nigne de Bacilly's Remarques curieuses sur l'art de bien chanter (1668) are the only detailed treatises explaining vocal ornamentation during this period. To clarify his ornamentation method, Millet introduces terms referring to placement of agrements, though few performers used them. Millet expresses the old style, popular under Louis XIII, and the provincial view. Bacilly's treatise deals with the air de cour under Louis XIV, which had a more Italian flavor. He gives aesthetic principles aiding the performer in placing and selecting ornaments. Though Millet and Bacilly describe the same practice, striking differences exist between the two air de cour styles.
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Jindrich Feld's Introduzione, Toccata E Fuga Per Flauto Solo With Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, Mozart, Messiaen, Berio, Martinu, Persichetti, and Others

Jindrich Feld's Introduzione, Toccata E Fuga Per Flauto Solo With Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, Mozart, Messiaen, Berio, Martinu, Persichetti, and Others

Date: May 1992
Creator: Derby McDermott, Dennette
Description: The Czechoslovakian composer Jindrich Feld (b.1925) composed Introduzione, Toccata e Fuga per Flauto Solo, for the Italian flutist Roberto Frabbriciani. Feld's Introduzione is from his third style period. This work may be labeled as a synthesis of the experiments and experiences that have enabled him to create his own mature style of expression.
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Joan Tower's Hexachords for Solo Flute: an Analysis and Comparison of its Flute Writing to Tower's Flute Concerto with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Vivaldi, Rivier, Mozart, Davidowsky, and Others

Joan Tower's Hexachords for Solo Flute: an Analysis and Comparison of its Flute Writing to Tower's Flute Concerto with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Vivaldi, Rivier, Mozart, Davidowsky, and Others

Date: May 1993
Creator: Jones, Margo S.
Description: This dissertation discusses two flute works by Joan Tower (born 1938). The performance medium consists of flute alone, Hexachords for Solo Flute (1972), and flute and orchestra, the Flute Concerto (1989). The discussion on Hexachords consists of a theoretical analysis; discussion on the Flute Concerto pertains to Tower's flute writing through an investigation into her musical language and specific performance techniques. Numerous examples are included to illustrate various aspects of Tower's style. Conclusions follow. The purpose of the paper is, first, to illustrate that basic knowledge of the twelve-tone method can bring a composition out of uncertainty for the performer and allow him to present what is unique within it. Secondly, it is to investigate the stylistic maturation of Joan Tower's flute works. In order to facilitate a better understanding of Tower's music and to provide commentary about the performance of each work, the writer has quoted from personal interviews with the composer and with flutists Carol Wincenc and Patricia Spencer, to whom the works are dedicated.
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Louis Cahuzac's Clarinet Music: an Examination of Selected Works, with Three Recitals and a Solo Performance of Selected Works by Debussy, Reinecke, Bloch, Stravinsky, Mozart and Others

Louis Cahuzac's Clarinet Music: an Examination of Selected Works, with Three Recitals and a Solo Performance of Selected Works by Debussy, Reinecke, Bloch, Stravinsky, Mozart and Others

Date: May 1995
Creator: Sanders, Raphael P.
Description: Louis Cahuzac was one of the most sought-after clarinetists in the first half of the twentieth century. He was also highly respected as a conductor, as a teacher, and as a composer of music for the clarinet. The selections performed and discussed in the lecture depict Cahuzac's use of simple compositional forms and procedures which blend the expressive capability of the clarinet with its technical potential.
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Matador

Matador

Date: May 1998
Creator: Patino, Julio
Description: Matador is an opera scored for orchestra, mixed chorus and soloists (mezzosoprano, 3 tenors, 2 baritones). The work is in one act divided into two main sections. Each of these sections is divided into subsections. The libretto is aphoristic in nature and dictates the form of each of these subsections. The division into two parts also serves as a means to evoke a sense of hopelessness of emotions in the first and a transforming disposition that culminates in a jubilant song in the second.
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A Mexican Postmodernist Vision Grounded on Structuralism: The Cases of Juan Trigos' Cuarteto Da Do (1988) and Victor Rasgado's Rayo Nocturnal (1989)

A Mexican Postmodernist Vision Grounded on Structuralism: The Cases of Juan Trigos' Cuarteto Da Do (1988) and Victor Rasgado's Rayo Nocturnal (1989)

Date: May 1999
Creator: Madrid-González, Alejandro L. (Alejandro Luis)
Description: This thesis contributes analyses of two works by Mexican composers: Rayo nocturnal (1989) by Victor Rasgado (b. 1959), and the Cuarteto da do (1988) by Juan Trigos (b. 1965). Although composed according to structuralist principles, a postmodern interpretation is offered. The analytical method applied is based on Allen Forte's set theory, including rhythmic and timbral dimensions that are integral to the conceptions of these works. A survey of modernism and postmodernism in twentieth-century Mexico serves to place these works in their cultural context.
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The Multi-percussion Writing of William Kraft in his Encounters Series With Three Recitals of Selected Works of Erb, Ptaszynska, Redel, Serry, and Others

The Multi-percussion Writing of William Kraft in his Encounters Series With Three Recitals of Selected Works of Erb, Ptaszynska, Redel, Serry, and Others

Date: May 1993
Creator: Bridwell, Barry D.
Description: The paper is divided into six chapters. The first two provide a brief summary of the evolution of multiple percussion and biographical information about Kraft. The remaining chapters are an examination of the origin, sound sources, compositional style, and performance problems of the ten Encounters pieces. The paper concludes with several appendices, including a chronological listing of Kraft's compositions which use percussion, a list of percussion equipment and notational symbols used in the Encounters pieces, and a discography of Kraft's music.
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A Nationwide Investigation of High School Band Directors' Reasons for Participating in Music Competitions

A Nationwide Investigation of High School Band Directors' Reasons for Participating in Music Competitions

Date: May 1994
Creator: Hurst, Craig Willmore
Description: The purpose of this study was to assess on a national level, high school band directors' reasons for their bands' participation in six different types of competitive music activities, identify important reasons for participation in competitive music activities, and examine if statistically significant differences existed between the magnitudes of importance reasons for participation when subjects' responses were grouped by type of competitive activity, frequency of participation in a competitive activity, and by groupings of U. S. states similar in terms of general participation in competitive music activities, emphasis upon ratings or rankings as an indication of a high school band directors' success, and emphasis upon participation in competitive music activities.
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Opera and the Galant Homme: Quinault and Lully's Tragedie en musique, Atys, in the Context of Seventeenth-Century Modernism

Opera and the Galant Homme: Quinault and Lully's Tragedie en musique, Atys, in the Context of Seventeenth-Century Modernism

Date: May 1994
Creator: Browne, Marilyn K. (Marilyn Kay)
Description: The tragedie en musique of Quinault and Lully was a highly successful new genre, representative of contemporary Parisian life. However, it is still largely viewed in the negative terms of its detractors, the proponents of classical tragedy. The purpose of this study is to redefine the tragedie en musique in terms of seventeenth-century modernism. An examination of the society and poetry of the contemporary gallant world provides the historical framework for an analysis of both the libretto and music of Quinault and Lully's Atys (1676). This study attempts to bridge the historical and cultural distances that until now have hindered accessibility to this major new genre in seventeenth-century literature and music.
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Orchestral Accompaniment in the Vocal Works of Hector Berlioz

Orchestral Accompaniment in the Vocal Works of Hector Berlioz

Date: May 1994
Creator: Lee, Namjai
Description: Recent Berlioz studies tend to stress the significance of the French tradition for a balanced understanding of Berlioz's music. Such is necessary because the customary emphasis on purely musical structure inclines to stress the influence of German masters to the neglect of vocal and therefore rhetorical character of this tradition. The present study, through a fresh examination of Berlioz's vocal-orchestral scores, sets forth the various orchestrational patterns and the rationales that lay behind them.
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Paintings and Palaces, or the Lament of the Burger Flipper

Paintings and Palaces, or the Lament of the Burger Flipper

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 1999
Creator: Salfen, Kevin McGregor
Description: The opera is scored for chamber orchestra consisting of one oboe, two Bb clarinets, two horns in F, one trumpet in C, one tenor trombone, two percussionists (playing snare drum, bass drum, tambourine, wood block, triangle, suspended cymbal, crash cymbal, agogo bells, cow bell, brake drum, metal whistle, whip, large gong, Glockenspiel, chimes, timpani in F (low) and C), eight or more violins in two parts, six or more violas in two parts, and eight or more cellos in two parts. The characters are Alejandro Jiminez, a dramatic tenor; the Manager of Burger Palace, a baritone; the Suits 1/Fast Food Workers, a choir (SATB) and the Suits 2/Customers, a second choir (SATB), each ideally consisting of eight vocalists for a total of sixteen; the Daydream Figures, which are mimed parts; the Man with Gun, which is a spoken part. The opera, in one act consisting of six scenes and an interlude, is based on a libretto by the composer. There is only one scene change: from an essentially empty stage to a fast food restaurant in Scene 4. The length of the work is approximately sixty to sixty-five minutes.
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