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Angels in Near-Death Experiences
Abstract: The literature on near-death experiences (NDEs) contains no substantive discussion of angels in NDEs, even though there are references to angels in several studies of these experiences. In this article I identify angels in NDEs and describe their functions in the NDE based on published NDE accounts. I conclude that angels are personages with whom the NDEr does not usually recall having previous acquaintance. Angels serve as guides, messengers, or escorts in the NDE. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc798908/
An Anthropological Perspective on Near-Death-Like Experiences in Three Men's Pregnancy-Related Spiritual Crises
Article bringing a transpersonal perinatal anthropological perspective to the study of three fathers' near-death-like experiences (NDEs) with the "spiritual emergencies" of three New Zealand men during their partners' pregnancies. It explores the seemingly anomalous male birth/death/rebirth experiences and draws some parallels with what some Western researchers have called "the shamanic crisis," and compares their stories with the symbolic reproductive maneuvers of shaman midwives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799058/
Archiving Web-Published Materials: A Needs Assessment of Librarians, Researchers, and Content Providers
Article discussing archiving web-published materials and a needs assessment of librarians, researchers, and content providers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29322/
Are Out-of-Body Experiences Evidence for Survival?
Article that seeks to define out-of-body experiences (OBEs) and argues that both theoretical and empirical reasons prove that OBEs cannot provide evidence for survival of death. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799265/
Are We There Yet? Toward a Workable Controlled Vocabulary for Music
This article discusses moving toward a workable controlled vocabulary for music. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc725811/
Art book indexes reviewed
Article discussing index characteristics considered important by reviewers of art books. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc335281/
Artificial Intelligence, Libraries, and Information Retrieval
Article discussing artificial intelligence, libraries, and information retrieval. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc77219/
ASI conference presentations: a content analysis of major topics, 1997-2012
Article on the American Society for Indexing (ASI) conference presentations. This article identifies major topics discussed at ASI conferences from 1997 through 2012 and explores how topics have changed over time. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc122177/
Assessing Psychologists' Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Near-Death Phenomena
Abstract: Nina Thornburg's (1988) Near-Death Phenomena Knowledge and Attitudes Questionnaire was distributed to 326 randomly selected Illinois psychologists. Of 117 usable questionnaires received, the mean score for knowledge questions was 7.5 of a maximum score of 18. Respondents were most knowledgeable about near-death elements of peace, out-of-body transcendence, and tunnel/light phenomena. The mean score for the attitude portion of the instrument was 61.3 of a maximum score of 85 points for the most positive attitude. Seven percent of the respondents indicated having had a near-death experience, 19% indicated having counseling near-death experiencers, and 28% indicated having had personal contacts with an experiencer. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799194/
Assessment in Fieldwork Courses: What Are We Rating?
This article uses inductive content analysis to assess fieldwork evaluations in library school coursework. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc826642/
Assessment of Cataloging Services in an Academic Library
This article contains survey data on cataloging services as assessed by personnel in the Public Services Division and the Catalog and Metadata Services Department. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc826646/
Assessment of Clergy Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Near-Death Experiences
Article discussing the results of a questionnaire distributed to clergy from Pennsylvania and Illinois, which showed the respondents had limited knowledge of the near-death experience (NDE) but had a moderately positive attitude toward the subject. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799179/
An Assessment of Physicians' Knowledge of and Attitudes Toward the Near-Death Experience
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate physicians' knowledge of and attitudes toward near-death experiences (NDEs). The study population consisted of 143 staff physicians in the Baptist Memorial Hospital System. Participants completed by mail a modified version of Thornburg's (1988) Near-Death Phenomena Knowledge and Attitudes Questionnaire. Less than one-fourth of the physicians had a well-grounded knowledge base regarding NDEs, while two-thirds had a positive attitude toward NDEs. These data suggest the need for inservice programs for medical and nursing staff regarding near-death phenomena. Further studies assessing physicians' knowledge of and attitudes toward NDEs are recommended utilizing a larger population from a wider geographical region. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799171/
At the Edge of Eternity's Shadows: Scaling the Fractal Continuum from Lower into Higher Space
Article addressing the hyperspatial implications of the fractal-scaling scheme, including several case studies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799356/
Automated Creation of Analytic Catalog Records for Born-Digital Journal Articles
Article summarizing the approach to bibliographic metadata development at the University of Michigan Library for journal articles published and archived in HathiTrust. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc306044/
"Being One with God Is Something That Can Be Done Without Rules": Commentary on Allan Kellehear's "Near-Death Experiences and the Pursuit of the Ideal Society"
Abstract: Allan Kellehear's article is a pioneering venture exploring features of the transcendent society and comparing it with J.C. Davis's typology of ideal societies. Kellehear assumed that in the life after life there is a sociocultural ordering that can be discussed via structural functional theory and concepts; and he also assumed internal and external validity, despite evidence tot he contrary in his article. I think both of these assumptions are incorrect. What we need are alternative sociocultural frameworks and alternative research strategies, possibly from the "new science." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799260/
Best Practices for Librarians Embedded in Online Courses
Article discussing research on embedded librarian services in collaboration with faculty in online courses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67620/
Biography indexes reviewed
Article discussing research on biography reviews and indexes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc103252/
Bozzano and the First Classification of Deathbed Visions: A Historical Note and Translation
Abstract: "Ernest Bozzano was an Italian parapsychologist who published, in 1923, one of the most important historical studies on deathbed visions. The book, while influencing such scholars as Charles Richet and Sir William Barrett, remained largely forgotten and untranslated. This paper provides a translation of selections from Bozzano's monograph illustrating his unique classification of death visions." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799114/
Brief Report: Near-Death Experiences among a Sample of Iranian Muslims
Abstract: Muslim near-death experiences (NDEs) have been rarely reported by comparison to the incident of NDEs reported in other groups. Recently, after Kreps (2009) found no NDEs in a sample from Pakistan and Kashmir, he concluded Muslim NDEs may even be nonexistent. However, in Arak City, Iran, we easily identified 19 Iranian Muslims who reported having experienced an NDE. Thirty participants claiming to have memories from a period of unconsciousness associated with a close brush with death completed a Persian translation of Greyson's (1983) NDE Scale as well as background and semi-structured questions. Of these, 19 (63%) scored 7 or higher on the NDE Scale, Greyson's criterion for a valid NDE. The presumed NDErs were 10 female and 9 male; aged 16 to 65 years old with a mean age of 33; ranging in education from no high school diploma (5%), to high school diploma (37%), to bachelor's degree (58%); reporting NDE circumstances of accident (58%), attempted suicide (16%), illness (11%), natural disaster (11%), and emotional trauma (5%); and reporting time since NDE ranging from less than one to 20 years with a mean of 8 years. Although low reliability precluded further statistical analysis of the data or comparison of them to results of previous Western studies, our informal assessment was that both the contents and aftereffects of the Muslim NDEs were quite similar to those of Westerners. We concluded that NDEs are not particularly rare in Muslim groups and that their similarity to Western NDEs suggests they may be a cross-culturally universal and transpersonal phenomenon. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc461762/
Brief Report: Psychologists' Knowledge of and Attitudes about Near-Death Experiences: Changes over Time and Relationship to Transpersonl Self-Concept
Abstract: We conducted a comparison and extension of Walker and Russell's (1989) study of psychologists' knowledge of and attitudes about near-death experiences (NDEs). We used their Near-Death Phenomena Knowledge and Attitudes Questionnaire (NDPKAQ), consisting of one knowledge scale and two attitude scales, to explore possible changes over time. We also used the Self-Expansiveness Level Form -- Transpersonal Scale (SELF-TS; Friedman, 1983) to explore the relationship of transpersonal self-concept with knowledge of and attitudes about NDEs. We randomly surveyed 84 psychologists listed in the Washington state National Register and obtained 18 completed responses (61% male, 39% female; mean age 60 years; ethnicity unknown). The comparison of our NDPKAQ data with Walker and Russell's Illinois psychologists' data suggests psychologists' knowledge and attitudes about NDEs have remained unchanged over the pas two decades (p > .05). Two of the three NDPKAQ scale scores correlated significantly with the SELF-TS scores (p = .03, .05), suggesting a positive relationship between transpersonal self-concept and knowledge of and attitudes towards NDEs. We discuss limitations of our results and implications of our findings for professional education and training on NDEs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc461750/
Briefing the Case: Constitution Day Outreach to Campus and Community
Article discussing Constitution Day outreach to campuses and communities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc110993/
Building a Better Librarian: Why Your Work As A Librarian Begins LONG Before Your Graduate Program
This articles discusses why ones work as a librarian begins long before their graduate program. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc96823/
Cardiac Arrest and Near-Death Experiences
Article which describes the process of cardiac resuscitation in some detail, explains how known data on cardiac resuscitation predict the incidence of these experiences, as well as how the functioning of the body during cardiac resuscitation explains the experiences undergone during NDEs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799067/
Cases of the Reincarnation Type with Memories from the Intermission Between Lives
Article analyzing reports from Burmese subjects which indicate that intermission memories can be broken down into three parts, and comparing these reports to reports of near-death experiences (NDEs), indicating that they show features similar to the transcendental component of Western NDEs and have significant areas of overlap with Asian NDEs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799278/
Cataloguing in 2012: On The Cusp Of RDA
This article discusses changes in music cataloguing systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc109704/
Census of Non-Western Near-Death Experiences to 2005: Overview of the Current Data
Abstract: This paper provides a census of non-Western near-death experiences (NDEs), noting similarities and differences in features with Western NDEs and other non-Western NDEs. The two sims of this current review are to update previous transcultural reviews with current data and to describe both crosscultural and culture-specific features of NDEs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799184/
The Centrality of Near-Death Experiences in Chinese Pure Land Buddhism
From introduction: "One of the commonest reactions to the visionary experiences of heaven by the critical observer has been to argue that these are nothing more than the projections of the expectations of the dying person, who was either consciously or subconsciously trained to expect heavenly scenery (etc.) by his cultural upbringing. [...] This paper is a preliminary report on the status of NDEs in Pure Land Buddhism in China, and is an important contribution to cross-cultural research for several reasons"(pp. 154-155). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799041/
The Challenge of Multimedia Networking
Article reviewing texts that examine both the promise and peril of developing networked multimedia systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc77220/
Changes in Heart Transplant Recipients That Parallel the Personalities of Their Donors
Study evaluating whether changes following heart transplant surgery parallel the history of the donors, based on the systemic memory hypothesis which predicts that all dynamical systems that contain recurrent feedback loops store information and energy to various degrees. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799207/
Changes in Religious Beliefs, Attitudes, and Practices Following Near-Death Experiences: An Australian Study
Abstract: This study examined changes in religious beliefs, attitudes, and practices in the lives of 50 near-death experiencers. I attempted to clarify whether these changes were to greater religiousness or to a deeper spirituality. I found that before the near-death experience (NDE), my respondents were no more religious or spiritually inclined than the general Australian population. Following the NDE there was a statistically significant shift towards spirituality on most items investigated. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799043/
Cheating the Ferryman: A New Paradigm of Existence?
Article presenting an argument for what occurs subjectively at the moment of death, using insights from quantum physics, neurology, perceptual science, psychiatry, and Gnosticism. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799359/
A Child's Encounter with the Devil: An Unusual Near-Death Experience with Both Blissful and Frightening Elements
Abstract: I describe the near-death experience (NDE) of a 6-year-old boy who encountered both the devil and God following a near-fatal car accident, and compare recent recollections of the event with those made four years earlier. I discuss the aftereffects of this experience, and review the findings of earlier studies of frightening NDEs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799294/
Claims of Near-Death Experiences, Gestalt Resistance Processes, and Measures of Optimal Functioning
Abstract: The present study investigated the relationship between claims of near-death experiences (NDEs) and measures of self-actualization. Gestalt resistance processes transfluence, mystical experiences, and claims of peak life experiences in a sample of 155 individuals. As hypothesized, I found significant positive correlations between the claims of NDEs and transfluence and mystical experiences. I found no significant correlations between claims of NDEs and the seven Gestalt resistances, suggesting that NDErs are neither more nor less resistant than nonNDErs. I also found no significant relationship between claims of NDEs and self-actualization or claims of peak life experiences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799035/
Clinical Approaches to the Out-of-Body Experience
Abstract: The author reviews aspects of the out-of-body experience (OBE) related to psychic experiences and personality traits, and describes a continuum of experiences of altered mind/body perception, from the prototypical OBE on the healthy end to schizophrenia and organic brain syndromes on the other end. The impact of the OBE on the individual's life is described, with suggestions for a psychoeducational approach to the clinical management of the patient with an OBE to allow maximum growth from the consciousness-expanding effects of the experience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc798989/
Commentary on Allan Kellehear's "Near-Death Experiences and the Pursuit of the Ideal Society"
Abstract: Allan Kellehear's article raised four questions for me: (1) whether the near-death experience (NDE) presents enough data about the nature of a transcendent society for it to be a useful model for earthly societies; (2) the degree to which transcendent societies have to address the practical considerations of a material society; (3) whether NDEs are projections of experiencers' cultural concepts about the nature of the transcendent realm(s); and (4) the kind of hope offered by the growing awareness of the features of Western NDEs. I address these questions by referring to transcendent realm concepts and NDEs in the anthropological literature, particularly that of the North American Indian Prophet Movement. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799231/
Commentary on "Does Paranormal Perception Occur in Near-Death Experiences?"
Abstract: Keith Augustine raises questions regarding Pam Reynolds's near-death experience (NDE) while undergoing cerebral aneurysm surgery using the hypothermic cardiac arrest ("standstill") procedure. I specifically address questions regarding anesthesia and brainstem auditory evoked response procedures; and the relation of Reynolds's NDE to "standstill" and life after death. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799458/
Commentary on "Does Paranormal Perception Occur in Near-Death Experiences?"
Editor's abstract and note: In this commentary, Charles Tart critiques Keith Augustine's deconstruction of Pam Reynolds's near-death experience (NDE) while undergoing cerebral aneurysm surgery using the hypothermic cardiac arrest ("standstill") procedure. However, after drafting this initial response to Augustine's paper, family medical problems prevented Tart from researching and polishing his comments as thoroughly as he would have wished. He has approved our publication of this commentary but regrets taht it is not up to his usual standard. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799460/
Commentary on "Frightening Near-Death Experiences"
Abstract: Kenneth Ring and Nancy Evans Bush both wrote papers concerning frightening near-death experiences (NDEs) in the Fall 1994 issue of this Journal. The results of my own research are more supportive of Bush's position than they are of Ring's. This paper gives some of the reasons why and illustrates other data accumulated by me concerning frightening NDEs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799367/
Commentary on Jansen's Paper
Abstract: Karl Jansen raises a fundamental and exciting question: Is humankind's consciousness the result of neuronal function, or are there extracerebral aspects as well? While his neurotransmitter model of near-death experiences (NDEs) is well described, I find his supporting evidence weak. Methodological differences between studies of ketamine hallucinations and near-death experiences (NDEs) raise doubts about how similar those experiences are phenomenologically. While Jansen's model has electrifying implications, the data required to support his conclusions do not yet exist. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799018/
Commentary on John Gibbs' "What Do Near-Death Experiencers and Jesus Have in Common? The Near-Death Experience and Spong's New New Christianity"
Abstract: John Gibbs relates research findings on near-death experiences (NDEs) to John Shelby Spong's "continuity view of Jesus" and his "call for a new Christianity." Gibbs' argument falls short of demonstrating congruence of the scientific findings of NDE research with the theological claims of Spong, who posits that Jesus was not God, but just a person. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799296/
Commentary on Keith Augustine's Article
Abstract: This commentary responds to Keith Augustine's article on the hallucinatory nature of near-death experiences (NDEs). It draws attention to his misreading of an important point made in my book Religion, Spirituality and the Near-Death Experience (Fox, 2003) regarding claims made by some NDErs to have traveled into outer space, reinforces the need for a thorough consideration of the epistemological complexities involved in asserting or denying a "common core" to NDEs, and ends by supporting the point made by Augustine that there is a pressing need for more crosscultural studies of the "core" phenomenon itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799028/
Commentary on Keith Augustine's Paper
Abstract: Keith Augustine claims that near-death experiences are actually hallucinations. However, this proposition has several serious problems that I explicate in this commentary. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799328/
Commentary on Keith Augustine's Paper
Abstract: Keith Augustine has provided a useful survey of the psychological and neurological correlates of near-death experiences and out-of-body experiences. The empirical findings he cites may prove awkward to accommodate under current separationist accounts of these experiences, although proponents of the separationist approach may be able to refine their theories so as to enhance their predictive power in this regard. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799087/
Commentary on "Near-Death Experiences with Hallucinatory Features"
Abstract: In this response to Keith Augustine's paper, I discuss the question of the nature and causation of near-death experiences (NDEs) with hallucinatory features. The attribution of hallucinations to either a brain mechanism or a peek into the afterworld raises fundamental questions about both the epistemology and ontology of our neuroscience, and of our scientific models of an afterlife. It also raises questions about the physiological state of the brain giving rise to NDEs that arise in very different situations and are clearly unlikely to have a unitary cause. These fundamental questions can be answered only in proper prospective trials when both the brain physiology and psychological variables of the experiencer are known. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc798944/
Commentary on "Nondualistic Experiences of Light in Near-Death Experiences and in The Tibetan Book of the Dead"
Abstract: René Jorgensen's editorial comparing the Clear Light in The Tibetan Book of the Dead (or Bardo Thodol) and the experience of light in some near-death experiences (NDEs) does not adequately acknowledge either the diversity of NDEs or the possibility that the content of The Tibetan Book of the Dead may be metaphorical. Similarities between descriptions of light in some NDEs and descriptions of the Clear Light in The Tibetan Book of the Dead may reflect similar underlying neural mechanisms and does not provide validation for either description. Any relevance of these descriptions to enlightenment is speculative. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799159/
Commentary on "Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences"
Abstract: Keith Augustine has provided a legitimate and cogent critique of a transcendental interpretation of near-death experiences, exposing weaknesses in the research methodology, paucity of the data, and gaps in the arguments. He offers evidence from psychophysiological and cultural correlates of NDEs that he interprets as favoring a hallucinatory understanding of these phenomena. however, his analysis relies on idiosyncratic definitions of psychological concepts, reads unidirectional causality into bivariate correlations, and underestimates the empirical predictions of the separation hypothesis. Despite less than compelling evidence for the transcendental hypothesis, it accounts for NDE phenomenology better than the materialist model. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc798881/
Commentary on Stuart W. Twemlow's "Misidentified Flying Objects?"
Abstract: Stuart Twemlow's article has made an important dual contribution to our thinking about anomalous experiences: first in offering a heuristic psychodynamic model in terms of which to view them, and second, in suggesting a definite link between near-death experiences (NDEs) and unidentified flying object (UFO) abductions. I consider his argument largely from the standpoint of my own recent research, which also brings out the similarities between precisely these same two types of encounters. My empirical findings support many of Twemlow's observations, but important differences are noted between his more psychoanalytic perspective and my imaginal one. My comments conclude with a strong endorsement of Twemlow's therapeutic stance toward anomalous experiences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799052/
Comments on "A Neurobiological Model for Near-Death Experiences"
Article presenting commentary on a neurobiological model proposed by Juan C. Saavedra-Aguilar and Juan S. Gómez-Jeria, which discusses the clinical similarities between temporal lobe seizures and near-death experiences (NDEs). Dr. Morse presents notes regarding his own research with colleagues based on similarities with various neurotransmitters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799293/
Comments on "A Neurobiological Model for Near-Death Experiences"
Article outlining the author's opinions and comments regarding a paper written by Juan C. Saavedra-Aguilar and Juan S. Gómez-Jeria, which approaches near-death experiences from a biological/neurological standpoint rather than a spiritual one. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799198/