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 Degree Discipline: Biology
 Degree Level: Master's
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Animal contribution to human medicine

Animal contribution to human medicine

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Date: May 2001
Creator: Kvernes, Kayce
Description: The use of animal models in research has led to a fierce debate between animal rights activists and scientists. The former claim that little useful information is gained from animal studies and the suffering of animals does not preclude any treatments which may be used to treat human illnesses. Yet, research scientists claim that in vivo animal models are of absolute necessity to developing treatments and cures to disease. To determine the necessity of animal use, one must examine the models currently in research. Have the animal models for disorders such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy given scientists enough information to develop effective treatments? This paper will examine the role of animal subjects in several disease research protocols, as well as the applicability of the research.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Chemotactic Response of Lumbricus terrestris Coelomocytes to Larval and Adult Stages of Rhabditis pellio

Chemotactic Response of Lumbricus terrestris Coelomocytes to Larval and Adult Stages of Rhabditis pellio

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Date: December 1999
Creator: Medrano, Jennifer Centurion
Description: Experiments were performed to assess the suitability of Rhabditis pellio, a nematode found in earthworms, as a challenge organism for use in development of a biomarker assay to determine the potential of chemicals to suppress the immunocompetence of the non-specific immune system. To accomplish this goal, information on the life cycle of R. pellio was determined; including effects of incubation time and temperature on growth rates; along with information on the immune response elicited in the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris. Immune parameters measured were coelomocyte migration toward and attachment to R. pellio larvae and adults. Preliminary background information showed that R. pellio has potential as a challenge organism for development of a biomarker assay.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Determination of Dissociation Constants for GABAA Receptor Antagonists using Spontaneously Active Neuronal Networks in vitro

Determination of Dissociation Constants for GABAA Receptor Antagonists using Spontaneously Active Neuronal Networks in vitro

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Date: December 2005
Creator: Oli-Rijal, Sabnam
Description: Changes in spontaneous spike activities recorded from murine frontal cortex networks grown on substrate-integrated microelectrodes were used to determine the dissociation constant (KB) of three GABAA antagonists. Neuronal networks were treated with fixed concentrations of GABAA antagonists and titrated with muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist. Muscimol decreased spike activity in a concentration dependent manner with full efficacy (100% spike inhibition) and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.14 ± 0.05 µM (mean ± SD, n=6). At 10, 20, 40 and 80 µM bicuculline, the muscimol IC50 values were shifted to 4.3 ± 1.8 µM (n=6), 6.8 ± 1.7 µM (n=6), 19.3 ± 3.54 µM (n=10) and 43.5 µM (n=2), respectively (mean ± SD). Muscimol titration in the presence of 10, 20, 40 µM of gabazine resulted in IC50s values of 20.1 (n=2), 37.17 (n=4), and 120.45 (n=2), respectively. In the presence of 20, 80, and 160 µM of TMPP (trimethylolpropane phosphate) the IC50s were 0.86 (n=2), 3.07 (n=3), 6.67 (n=2) µM, respectively. Increasing concentrations of GABAA antagonists shifted agonist log concentration-response curves to the right with identical efficacies, indicating direct competition for the GABAA receptor. A Schild plot analysis with linear regression resulted in slopes of 1.18 ± 0.18, 1.29 ...
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Evaluation of virulence in wild type and pyrimidine auxotrophs of  Pseudomonas aeruginosa using the eukaryotic model system  Caenorhabditis elegans.

Evaluation of virulence in wild type and pyrimidine auxotrophs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using the eukaryotic model system Caenorhabditis elegans.

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Date: August 2004
Creator: Anvari, Sara
Description: The human opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, has been shown to kill the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans has been a valuable model for the study of bacterial pathogenesis, and has reinforced the notion that common virulence and host defense mechanisms exist. Recently, the pyrimidine pathway was shown to regulate virulence levels. Therefore, mutations in the pyrimidine pathway of PAO1 showed decrease virulence in the nematode. When starving the nematode, bacterial resistance was also shown to increase. It was hypothesized that starvation induced the DAF pathway, which regulates the transcription of genes involved with the antibacterial defense mechanism. Further research will be conducted to test this theory by performing RNAi experiments for the genes functioning in the antibacterial defense mechanism.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Evidentiary Value of Condoms: Comparison of Durable Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Condoms

Evidentiary Value of Condoms: Comparison of Durable Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Condoms

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Date: May 2000
Creator: Belcher, Kelly Leigh
Description: Condom trace evidence must not be overlooked in sexual assault cases; understanding the chemical and physical characteristics of condoms is imperative if condoms are to be useful evidence. Previous research shows that condom identification is possible, but it is equally important to evaluate durability of condom residues versus time. Using FT-IR, this study examined vaginal swabs from subjects who self-sampled at intervals for up to 72 hours after having intercourse with a condom. This study investigated whether age and the stage of the menstrual cycle affected the durability of residues in the vagina over time. This study revealed that condoms containing nonoxynol-9, silicone-based lubricants, and particulates provide valuable information for identification, and that nonoxynol-9 specifically withstands the vaginal environment for up to 72 hours. Additionally, age and menstrual cycle both appeared to have an effect on the durability of residues although larger sample size is desirable.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
General Biology Lecture and Laboratory Curriculum Outline in a Two or Four-Year College

General Biology Lecture and Laboratory Curriculum Outline in a Two or Four-Year College

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Date: August 2000
Creator: Moreland, Amy L.
Description: In July of 1999, I wrote to 24 Texas junior and community colleges (and one four-year institution) describing my thesis agenda of a general biology lecture and laboratory syllabus for introductory biology students. I requested the titles and authors of the general biology textbooks and laboratory manuals they were currently using, the publishers of these texts, and the edition of said texts. I then contacted publishers of the various textbooks who, in turn, directed me to the Dallas-area representatives for further inquiries. I assimilated the various authors' general biology topics into a two-semester syllabus of lecture and one semester of laboratory. The document is not a text manuscript, but an all-inclusive listing of a general biology syllabus broken down by subject.
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Inherent Problems Associated with the Identification of Genes Responsible for Allowing  B. cepacia to Adhere to Human Lung Carcinoma A549 Cells

Inherent Problems Associated with the Identification of Genes Responsible for Allowing B. cepacia to Adhere to Human Lung Carcinoma A549 Cells

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Date: May 2001
Creator: Nesty, Gilda S.
Description: In this project a bacteria's ability to bind to human lung tissue was investigated. To carry out this study Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Eschericia coli and Burkholderia cepacia were used. B. cepacia served as the bacterium of interest. Isolating the gene which confers upon this bacterium the ability to bind to lung tissue was the main objective of this study. P. aeruginosa has been identified as being the bacteria most responsible for causing serious lung infections that can result in cystic fibrosis. This bacterium therefore served as the positive control in this study. On the contrary, E. coli does not possess this binding ability and served as the negative control. This paper gives a detailed outline of the different procedures necessary for the successful completion of this project. Firstly, a broad guideline of the important steps involved are explored. This is followed by a discussion on potential problems and possible solutions. Throughout the document, illustrations of expected results are indicated so as to further guide the researcher.
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Inquiry-based science for high school students: a forensic unit

Inquiry-based science for high school students: a forensic unit

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Date: August 2000
Creator: Apple, Kendra Kea
Description: This project constitutes an instructional unit for honors biology that involves the use of science in the field of criminal investigation and forensics. Before beginning the unit, the learners should have mastered basic laboratory skills, including use of the microscope. They should also have an understanding of the basic structure and function of DNA and its role in heredity and protein synthesis. The standard time frame is 24 days with 70-minute periods, but can be easily adjusted to meet classroom needs. Several instructional strategies enhance student learning and make science fun. The unit is inquiry-driven and activity-based. Students are surprised by the crime, gather and analyze evidence, and work towards proposing an explanation. This real world problem involves the use of cooperative learning and a variety of assessment techniques.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Integrating Concepts in Modern Molecular Biology into a High School Biology Curriculum

Integrating Concepts in Modern Molecular Biology into a High School Biology Curriculum

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Date: August 2003
Creator: Parker, Timothy P.
Description: More so than any other science in the past several decades, Biology has seen an explosion of new information and monumental discoveries that have had a profound impact on much more than the science itself. Much of this has occurred at the molecular level. Many of these modern concepts, ideas, and technologies, as well as their historical context, can be easily understood and appreciated at the high school level. Moreover, it is argued here that the integration of this is critical for making biology relevant as a modern science. A contemporary high school biology curriculum should adequately reflect this newly acquired knowledge and how it has already has already begun to revolutionize medicine, agriculture, and the study of biology itself. This curriculum provides teachers with a detailed framework for integrating molecular biology into a high school biology curriculum. It is not intended to represent the curriculum for an entire academic year, but should be considered a significant component. In addition to examining key concepts and discoveries, it examines modern molecular techniques, their applications, and their relevance to science and beyond. It also provides several recommended labs and helpful protocols.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A laboratory course in experimental genetics for the biology major.

A laboratory course in experimental genetics for the biology major.

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Date: December 2001
Creator: Lux, Melissa McNeil
Description: This manual has been designed for a class of twenty- four students concurrently enrolled in the lecture course. The laboratory aids in the learning process and fosters an interest in the science of genetics. This manual and the experiments contained within are both informative and fun. The manual correlates with and expands upon the genetics course. Each investigation, with the exception of the Drosophila melanogaster project, can be completed in a 3-4 hour timeframe. This manual provides a “hands on” experience of theories simply discussed in the lecture course. This manual is intended to be a one-source manual where each investigation is designed to include an adequate introduction. Special attention has been given for each investigation with both the student and instructor in mind.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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