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Rejoinder to Responses to "Could Pam Reynolds Hear?"

Rejoinder to Responses to "Could Pam Reynolds Hear?"

Date: Autumn 2011
Creator: Woerlee, Gerald M.
Description: Abstract: In this article I provide a rejoinder to Stuart Hameroff's and Chris Carter's responses to my article, "Could Pam Reynolds Hear?" (2011, this issue). I address some specifics of anesthesiology and neurosurgical technique to maintain my contention that Reynolds could hear through normal physical processes during her near-death experience.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Terminal Lucidity in People with Mental Illness and Other Mental Disability: An Overview and Implications for Possible Explanatory Models

Terminal Lucidity in People with Mental Illness and Other Mental Disability: An Overview and Implications for Possible Explanatory Models

Date: Winter 2009
Creator: Nahm, Michael
Description: Abstract: The literature concerned with experiences of the dying contains numerous accounts reporting the sudden return of mental clarity shortly before death. These experiences can be described as Terminal Lucidity (TL). The most peculiar cases concern patients suffering from mental disability including mental illness or dementia. Despite the potential relevance of TL for developing new forms of therapies and for elaborating an improved understanding of the nature of human consciousness, very little has been published on this subject. In this paper I present a historical overview and selected case reports of TL of mentally ill or otherwise disabled patients, mainly drawing on the literature available in English and in German. Possible explanatory models of TL and their implications are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Book Reviews: The Art of Dying and Into the Light

Book Reviews: The Art of Dying and Into the Light

Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Punzak, Dan
Description: Review of two books titled "The Art of Dying" written by Peter Fenwick and Elizabeth Fenwick and "Into the Light" written by John Lerma.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Book Review: The Handbook of Near-Death Experiences: Thirty Years of Investigation

Book Review: The Handbook of Near-Death Experiences: Thirty Years of Investigation

Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Grossman, Neal
Description: Review of a book titled "The Handbook of Near-Death Experiences: Thirty Years of Investigation" written by Janice Miner Holden, Bruce Greyson, and Debbie James (Eds.).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Collections Shifting Methodology Report for the UNT Libraries

Collections Shifting Methodology Report for the UNT Libraries

Date: October 2013
Creator: Venner, Mary Ann & Leuzinger, Julie
Description: Report for the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries on collection shifting methodology.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Book Review: The Handbook of Near-Death Experiences: Thirty Years of Investigation

Book Review: The Handbook of Near-Death Experiences: Thirty Years of Investigation

Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Vincent, Ken R.
Description: Review of a book titled "The Handbook of Near-Death Experiences: Thirty Years of Investigation" written by Janice Miner Holden, Bruce Greyson, and Debbie James (Eds.)
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Panoramic Memory, Affect, and Sensations of Detachment in the Dying: Discussions Published in France, 1889-1903

Panoramic Memory, Affect, and Sensations of Detachment in the Dying: Discussions Published in France, 1889-1903

Date: Winter 2011
Creator: Alvarado, Carlos S.
Description: Abstract: Between 1889 and 1903, several authors published papers in the French journal "Revue Philosophique de la France et de l'Etranger" and in a few other publications in which they discussed panoramic memory, changes of affect, and a sense of detachment from the body in dying persons. With a few exceptions these publications have been ignored in modern discussion of the phenomena of the dying. Whereas philosopher Victor Egger postulated the psychological explanation that panoramic memory results from the dying person's thoughts of imminent death, physicians Paul Sollier and Charles Féré and psychologist Henri Piéron proposed that it, as well as changes in affect, result from physiological changes in the body sensibility and in the brain. Like many authors today who speculate about near-death experiences, the authors in question did not have much evidence for their explanations. These ideas, and their physiological aspects, were part of a general interest in unusual phenomena and states of consciousness during the 19th century.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Rejoinder to "Response to 'Corroboration of the Dentures Anecdote Involving Veridical Perception in a Near-Death Experience'"

Rejoinder to "Response to 'Corroboration of the Dentures Anecdote Involving Veridical Perception in a Near-Death Experience'"

Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Smit, Rudolf H. & Rivas, Titus
Description: Abstract: In this article we rejoin Gerald Woerlee's response in this issue to Smit's (2008) article, "Corroboration of the Dentures Anecdote Involving Veridical Perception in a Near-Death Experience." We show the untenability of his claim that the man whose dentures were lost before his resuscitation in the hospital was initiated had been conscious virtually all the way from the moment he was found in the meadow up to his transport to the hospital's cardiac care unit. Also, we question Woerlee's claim that the patient constructed an accurate mental picture of objects and persons in the resuscitation room simply by listening to the sounds caused by the actions around his body. In all, we question Woerlee's materialistic explanations of the out-of-body experience that occurred in this patient's near-death experience. Our conclusion is straightforward: We consider Woerlee's claims to be wrong.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Response to "Could Pam Reynolds Hear?"

Response to "Could Pam Reynolds Hear?"

Date: Autumn 2011
Creator: Carter, Chris
Description: Abstract: The near-death experience (NDE) of Pam Reynolds is one of the most impressive and medically well-documented NDEs in the literature. It took place during an operation to remove a brain aneurism, and it included almost all the aspects of a classic NDE, including accurate visual perception of the operating theater. Furthermore, parts of the experience would seem to have occurred when no brain activity whatsoever was possible. Despite testimony to the contrary by the medical personnel involved, Gerald Woerlee has attempted to explain Reynold's experience as a result of auditory impressions combined with an anesthesia-induced fantasy. I argue here that Woerlee's attempted explanation is simply unsupported by the documented facts of the case. I also invite Woerlee to accompany me to the Barrow Neurological Institute to participate in an empirical test under the exact auditory conditions Reynolds experienced.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Book Review: The Natural Soul

Book Review: The Natural Soul

Date: Winter 2009
Creator: Greyson, Bruce
Description: Review of a book titled "The Natural Soul" written by Barbara Harris Whitfield.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries