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  Partner: UNT Music Library
 Collection: Virtual Music Rare Book Room
Ballet du Temple de la paix
The elements that make up the Jean-Baptiste Lully's Ballet du Temple de la Paix have some parallels to the plot of Roland, which premiered in the same year. Both celebrate the expanding influence of France and Louis XIV through the introduction of exotic characters. The flexibility of the ballet de cour format, which was more a progression of loosely related scenes and spectacles than an organized plot, allowed librettist Philippe Quinault more freedom in his elaboration of that theme. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc69/
Barbe bleue : comédie en prose et en trois actes
Although the story of Bluebeard was familiar to French readers from Charles Perrault’s 1698 collection of children’s tales, transferring it to the operatic stage was problematic due in large part to the gruesome nature of the plot. Other violent works had appeared in Paris, but in this instance, the drama was to be performed at the Comédie-Italienne, which typically featured lighter plots than that of Raoul and Isaure. Nevertheless, the opera had a successful run, receiving over a hundred performances in the decade after its premiere. After its initial popularity, Raoul Bluebeard was staged less frequently, but it still made an impression on nineteenth-century composers, particularly Weber. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc17/
Barbier de Seville [Il barbiere di Siviglia] Opéra comique en quatre actes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26/
Beggar's opera
This is a 1735 fourth ed. of the three-act ballad opera "The beggar's opera" by John Christopher Pepusch and John Gay. It includes the score for the overture (for violins (2), viola, and bass ensemble) and the melodies of each song. The inscription, "Nos haec novimus esse nihil" (transl. as, We know these to be nothing) that appears on the t.p. is an epigram by Marcus Valerius Martialis from his Books of Epigrams. On the back of the t.p. appears the advertisement of these works printed by John Watts: Fifty one new fables in verse; The tunes to the songs in the Beggar's Opera, transposed for the flute; and Gay's opera "Achilles." A table of songs shows the first lines of text for each act. The item includes a list of characters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25946/
Bellérophon; tragedie mise en musique
Although not the first of the Jean-Baptiste Lully's tragédies lyriques, Bellérophon was the first of Lully's opera scores to appear in print. The Ballard first edition was printed in 1679 to accompany the premiere, on January 31 of that year, at the Palais Royale. Bellérophon was the second of two operas (the first was Psyché) created by Lully without librettist Philippe Quinault after the scandal associated with Isis that led to Quinault's temporary dismissal as royal librettist. After an extended illness during which he did not compose, Lully collaborated with Thomas Corneille and Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle for the second time to create one of his most unqualified successes. Following the first performance in January 1679, Bellérophon played for nine months at the Palais Royale. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58/
Belshazzar : a sacred Oratorio in Score
A sacred oratorio in three acts for soloists and mixed chorus (SATB) with orchestra acc. (2 oboes, 2 violins, viola, and basso continuo). A contents index is given on p. 219. According to the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Handel composed this oratorio from 23 August - 23 October 1744. Charles Jennens wrote the libretto on the Biblical story of the downfall of the King of Babylon with details taken from "Cyropaedia" (a political romance about the education of an ideal ruler) by Herodotus and Xenophon's. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11078/
Buona figliuola : opera comica
Goldoni turned to Samuel Richardson’s novel Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1740) as the inspiration for his La buona figliuola. In 1750, he wrote the play Pamela nubile and then turned it into a libretto for Duni. Although Duni’s La buona figliuola (1756) was a failure, Piccinni’s setting in 1760 was a huge success. The hilarious comedy coupled with Piccinni’s sentimental treatment of Cecchina contributed to the popularity of the opera, which still receives performances to this day. Typical of opera buffe, La buona figliuola features chain-like finales that propel the plot and characters to the end of the act (at that time, sectional finales were new to Rome). Other features of his music that receive praise are the beautiful, Italianate melodies, energetic accompaniments, and the variety of musical treatment throughout the opera. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32/
Le cadi dupé
This is a 1766 copy of the libretto of the one-act comic opera "Le cadi dupé" (The duped judge), by Pierre René Lemonnier to music by Pierre-Alexandre Monsigny. The first performance of the opera took place at the Paris Foire St-Germain on 4 February 1761. Christoph Willibald Gluck's music replaced that of Monsigny's for the 8 December 1761 performance at the Burgtheater in Vienna. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39292/
Le carnaval de Venise
This is a digital copy of "Le carnaval de Venise" by Leopold von Meyer. The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. This piece was dedicate to the operatic soprano Eugenie García (née Mayer; 1815-1880), who was the first wife of the famous Spanish baritone Manuel García. "Le carnaval de Venise" is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39266/
Catone in Utica
This is a ca. 1763 copy of the libretto of "Catone in Utica," by Metastasio. Gian Francesco de Majo set this libretto to music for the 1763 carnival season in Turin. In this story, Caesar and Fulvio meet Cato, Utica's ruler, and offer him a peace truce, but Emilia, Pompey's widow, suspects treachery and plots to murder Caesar. Cato rejects a Senate's order for a reconciliation with Caesar and demands that Caesar surrender his dictatorial powers. Marzia, Cato's daughter, promised in marriage to Arbace, is in love with Caesar and pleas to her father to deter him from waging war. Arbace, who feels that his love for Marcia was betrayed, is lured by Emilia into an assassination attempt on Caesar. Fulvio is led to believe that Emilia will attempt on Caesar's life as he leaves by the gate of the city and advises him to take a secret path only to discover that Emilia used him to deliver Caesar into the hands of her followers. As Fulvio announces the victory of Caesar's armies in Utica, Cato stabs himself and before dying grants forgiveness to Marcia on condition that she swear loyalty to Arbaces and hatred towards Caesar. The library's copy of "Catone in Utica" is bound with the following librettos: "Ifigenia in Aulide", by Vittorio Amedeo Cigna-Santi; "Sofonisba" by Mattia Verazi; "Arianne e Teseo" by Pietro Pariati; and "Le piacevoli poesie" by Gasparo Gozzi. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39294/
Cendrillon
Libretto of the 1759 pastiche-style comic opera "Cendrillon," by Louis Anseaume. The songs were contributed by the singer-composer Jean-Louis Laruette and Egidio Duni, which they likely adapted from fashionable tunes. "Cendrillon" (Cinderella in English) premiered in Paris at Foire St-Germain on February 21, 1759. The opera underwent two revisions before the definitive version of 1764. Anseaume adapted the plot the fairy tale by Charles Perrault. This copy includes (from pp.54-63) notated melodies of airs and recitatives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39252/
Colinette à la cour ou La double épreuve : comédie lyrique en trois actes
A comparison of the scores for Colinette à la cour and Barbe-bleue illustrates the primary distinguishing factor between the genres of comédie lyrique and opera comique: the method of dialogue delivery. In Paris, the issue of genre was tied to the performance venue of a particular opera, due to government regulations. Although comic opera was traditionally presented with spoken dialogue, as in opera comique, when Grétry composed for the Opéra, where recitative was expected, he merged comic subject matter with the sung dialogue heard in serious opera. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc18/
[Collection of Eleven Operas: Le triomphe de l'amour; Coronis: pastorale heroïque; Isis: tragedie en musique; Amadis: tragedie en musique; Phaeton: tragedie en musique; Proserpine: tragedie en musique; Zephire et Flore: opera; Thetis et Pelée: tragedie en musique; Enée et Lavinie: tragedie en musique; Astrée: tragedie; Roland: tragedie en musique]
This book contains a collection of librettos for ballets, tragedies and opera staged for Louis XIV from ca. 1680-1691. The works reflect the collaboration of Jean-Baptiste Lully and dance masters and librettists in the court of Louis XIV. The following French dramatic works are included in the collection: Le triomphe de l'amour; Coronis; Isis; Amadis; Phaeton; Proserpine; Zephire et Flore; Thetis et Pelée; Enée et Lavinie; Astrée; and Roland. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11804/
Colonie : opéra comique en deux actes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc41/
Coronis
Libretto of the 1691 "Coronis," a French lyrical genre called pastorale-heroïque, representing the love of nobles or gods often disguised as shepherds (or shepherdesses) in Arcadian settings. Daniel-Paul Chappuzeau de Baugé wrote the libretto and Teobaldo de Gatti composed its music. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39253/
Daisy: Opera in Two Acts
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
This is the original conductor's score for the opera "Daisy" including the vocal parts as well as instrumental lines for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horns, trumpets, bass trombone, timpani and percussion, harp and piano, violin, viola, cello, and string bass. The introductory pages at the start of the score include acknowledgements and synopsis by Professor Kenneth L. Ballenger, the cast of characters and scene list (5 scenes). There is an index to the scenes for each act following their title pages (before page 1 for Act I and before page 262 for Act II). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11083/
Les Danaïdes, tragédie lirique en cinq actes
Antonio Salieri began work on Les Danaïdes upon the recommendation of Gluck, whose health prevented him from fulfilling a commission for the work. Although Salieri was living in Vienna, the tragedie-lyrique was written for the Opéra in Paris, with a libretto by François Louis Gand Leblanc Roullet and Ludwig Theodor Tschudi based on Calzabigi’s Italian libretto. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc46/
Dardanus : nouvelle tragédie
Dardanus went through a number of revisions from the time of its premiere in 1739 until its final eighteenth-century run at the Opéra in 1771. The version in the Virtual Rare Book Room was first performed in 1744; the last three acts exhibit extensive plot changes from the first edition. The final version in 1760 received the most positive acclaim, especially compared to the criticisms that were made about the nonsensical plot of the first version. By this point, however, the polemic between the Lullistes and the Ramistes, which had surrounded the premiere, had subsided. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc37/
Dardanus : tragédie lyrique en quatre actes
Like Renaud, Sacchini’s second French opera, Dardanus, faced problems due in large part to the composer’s Italian heritage. The opera is based on Rameau’s Dardanus, which had been a topic of earlier dispute between the Lullistes and the Ramistes. After an initially disappointing reception, Dardanus was reduced from four acts to three. In its first form, the opera received only six performances, but the three-act version was performed more than thirty times during the eighteenth century. Dardanus went on to enjoy several productions in the first decade of the nineteenth century. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc42/
Le depart et le retour, deux nocturnes
This is a digital copy of two nocturnes "Le depart" and "Le retour" by Leopold von Meyer. These nocturnes were issued as the first of four pieces published under the title "Repertoire de Léopold de Meyer." The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. These nocturnes are part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39277/
Les deux chasseurs et la laitière; comédie en un acte
Undated score of Egidio Duni's opera Les deux chaussures et la laitière. Duni’s French style was shaped by the developments of the War of the Buffoons, which pitted French tragic opera against Italian comic opera. The newly emergent opéra comique genre, for which Duni is still considered to be one of the major contributors, combined elements of both styles. His significance in the development of opéra comique is evident in the long-term success of Les deux chasseurs et la laitière, which was performed at the Comédie-Italien until 1792, almost twenty years after the composer’s death. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc8/
Les deux chasseurs et la laitière; comédie en un acte
Duni’s French style was shaped by the developments of the War of the Buffoons, which pitted French tragic opera against Italian comic opera. The newly emergent opéra comique genre, for which Duni is still considered to be one of the major contributors, combined elements of both styles. His significance in the development of opéra comique is evident in the long-term success of Les deux chasseurs et la laitière, which was performed at the Comédie-Italien until 1792, almost twenty years after the composer’s death. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc7/
Les deux comtesses : opera bouffon imité de l'Italien et parodié sous la musique
Paisiello’s comic operas were some of the most successful of the time. In point of fact, his operas enjoyed 251 performances in Vienna between 1783 and 1792, compared to 63 performances of Mozart’s operas. The intermezzo Le due comtesse, which first appeared in Rome (with an all-male cast) on 3 January 1776, was translated to French and parodied by Nicolas Etienne Framery, who also adapted Paisiello’s Il barbiere di Siviglia for the Parisian stage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc27/
Les deux journées
Vocal score of Luigi Cherubini's rescue opera "Les deux journées" (also known by the title, The water carrier) to a libretto by Jean-Nicolas Bouilly. The first performance took place in Paris at Théâtre Feydeau on January 16, 1800 followed by 56 performance during that year. Les deux journées remained in the international repertory of operas for most of the 19th century. The piano reduction contains the text in French and German. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39254/
Devil to pay: or, The wives metamorphos'd
English libretto to Charles Coffey's ballad opera The devil to pay or, The wives metamorphos'd. The Devil to Pay is an adaptation of Thomas Jevon’s play The Devil of a Wife (1686). Nearly fifty years later, the ballad opera appeared at Drury Lane with Charles Coffey and John Mottley each responsible for half of the three acts. However, a much shorter and more well-received one-act version, edited by Theophilus Cibber, is represented in the printed libretto. Today Coffey is generally the only name widely attached to The Devil to Pay. The opera’s popularity is attested by the frequent performances and a translation into German, which contributed to the development of the Singspiel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2/
Le devin du village
As with many French operas, Rousseau’s Le devin du village was first staged for the court, appearing at Fountainebleau on 18 October 1752. The work was then performed at the Paris Opéra on 1 March 1753. The historical importance of this short intermè is closely tied to its role in the famous Querelle de bouffons, a debate about the merits of French serious opera in comparison to Italian comic opera (especially Pergolesi’s La serva padrona). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc40/
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 1
This is a copy of the first volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1879, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "A" (i.e., the sixth note in the scale of C major) to "I" (impromptu). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[vii]-viii), signed "Bedford Street, Covent Garden, April 1, 1879." The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31504/
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 2
This is a copy of the second volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1880, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "I" (improperia) to "P" (plain song). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[v]-vii, signed "Bedford Street, Covent Garden, October 1, 1880." The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31505/
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 3
This is a copy of the third volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1883, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "P" (Planché, James Robinson) to "S" (the title of the Medieval rota, "Sume is icumen in"). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[v]-vii, signed "29 Bedford Street, Covent Garden, July, 1883." The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31506/
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 4
This is a copy of the fourth volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1890, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "S" (continuation of the article about the Medieval rota, "Sume is icumen in" that appears on vol. 3) to "Z" (starting with the singer, Zur Mühlen, Raimund von). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[vi]-xi. The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31507/
Didon; tragédie lyrique en trois actes
With Didon, Piccinni demonstrated his ability to combine both Italian and French styles to create a compelling tragédie lyrique. The opera includes lyrical Italian melodies and a second-act finale, as well as French choruses and numbers that transition continuously without pauses. Didon was premiered at Fountainebleau on 16 October 1783, and it remained one of Piccinni’s most popular French operas, with performances through the first part of the nineteenth century. The story of Dido had been realized on the operatic stage before Piccinni’s setting, including Cavalli’s Didone (1641), Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas (c. 1689), and Vinci’s Didone abbandonata (1726) with a libretto by Metastasio. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc33/
Don Juan, oder, Der Steinerne Gast : komische Oper in zwey Aufzügen, volume 1
By the time of Mozart and Da Ponte’s collaboration on Don Giovanni, the Don Juan legend had been represented in musical entertainments and on the popular stage a number of times. Although it was an unusual topic for Viennese court opera, the retelling of the Don Juan story was immensely appealing for the Italian troupe in Prague. Don Giovanni did eventually make its way to Vienna, but the opera did not meet the same success it had received in Prague. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84/
Don Juan, oder, Der Steinerne Gast : komische Oper in zwey Aufzügen, volume 2
By the time of Mozart and Da Ponte’s collaboration on Don Giovanni, the Don Juan legend had been represented in musical entertainments and on the popular stage a number of times. Although it was an unusual topic for Viennese court opera, the retelling of the Don Juan story was immensely appealing for the Italian troupe in Prague. Don Giovanni did eventually make its way to Vienna, but the opera did not meet the same success it had received in Prague. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc85/
Echo et Narcisse, drame lyrique en trois actes
After the resounding success of Iphigénie en Tauride (1779), Gluck set out to compose his last of the seven Paris operas, which turned out to be his final opera. Whereas Iphigénie en Tauride is often considered Gluck’s best opera, its immediate successor, Echo et Narcisse (1779) was ill-fated and quickly disappeared from the repertoire. Echo was premiered a mere four months after Tauride, and the Parisian audience was not prepared for the differences between these two operas. Although the music resembles that of his other French operas, the pastoral story lacks the dramatic intensity that viewers expected in a Gluck opera. Thus, the serene music—though it is at times quite beautiful— lacks dramatic impulse. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13/
Elements of Musical Composition; comprehending the Rules of Thorough Bass, and the Theory of Tuning.
Manual describing musical composition for beginners. The manual is divided in 9 chapters and includes 479 musical examples engraved in 59 pages at the end of the book, as well as four plates with figures (plate no. II appears at the beginning of the book. The musical examples cover the following subjects: scales, intervals (diatonic and chromatic) and their inversion, counterpoint rules, harmonic progressions, use of non-harmonic tones (suspensions, passing notes, appoggiaturas, and upper-lower neighbor. It also includes several examples taken from Handel's "Dettingen Te Deum," "Messiah," and from Haydn's oratorio "Creation," among others. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39255/
Enée et Lavinie
Libretto of the opera "Enée et Lavinie" by Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle. Pascal Collasse composed the music of the opera which premiered on November 7, 1690. The plot, which Bovier de Fontenelle adapted from Virgil's "Aeneid, Book vii," revolves around the marriage of Enée (i.e., Aeneas) to the Latin bride Lavinia. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39256/
Épreuve villageoise : opéra bouffon en deux actes en vers
L’épreuve villageoise started out as Théodore et Paulin before Grétry convinced Desforges to rewrite the libretto. The original three-act opera was reduced to two acts, and the improbabilities of the original plot were reworked. Théodore et Paulin received one performance at Versailles on 5 March 1784, but it was never published. L’épreuve villageoise appeared at the Comédie-Italienne on 24 June 1784. This revision remained one of the most popular of Grétry’s opéra-comiques, receiving performances throughout the nineteenth century. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc19/
Estebanillo: zarzuela en tres actos, en verso
Libretto of the three-act zarzuela "Estebanillo" by Ventura de la Vega. The plot is an adaptation of the ca. 1634 Spanish comedy, "Fortuna te dé Dios, hijo" (May God give you good luck, son), by the playwright Tirso de Molina's. The zarzuela is also known by the title "Estebanillo Peralta." It was premiered in 1855 at the Teatro del Circo (built in 1834 and destroyed by fire in 1876). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39257/
Esther, a sacred oratorio in score
This is a ca. 1794 score of "Esther," a sacred oratorio by Handel. According to the Grove Dictionary of Music, the English libretto of the oratorio was probably a collaborative work between John Arbuthnot and Alexander Pope with additional words by Samuel Humphreys. The engraved frontispiece that precedes the t.p. bears the title "Apotheosis of Handel," and the inscription, "The portrait from an original picture of Hudson's in the possession of Dr. Arnold. Designed by Rebecca [Biagio]. Engraved by [James] Heath. Published the 26th of May 1787, being the anniversary of the commemoration of Handel." A table of contents appears on p. 185 with incipits of first lines of text of recitatives and aria. The performance medium includes: oboes (2), flute, bassoon (2), trumpet, strings (violins, viola, violoncello, and bass), harp, soloists (S) and mixed chorus (SATB), and basso continuo. The choral number that appears in the appendix on p.183, contains a note, "This chorus comes in page 122." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25948/
Esther, a sacred oratorio in score
This is a bound copy of a ca. 1794 score of "Esther," a sacred oratorio by Handel. The cover contains the inscription, "The works of Handel, edited by Dr. Arnold." It does not include the frontispiece preceding the t.p. According to the Grove Dictionary of Music, the English libretto of the oratorio was probably a collaborative work between John Arbuthnot and Alexander Pope with additional words by Samuel Humphreys. A table of contents appears on p. 185 with incipits of first lines of text of recitatives and aria. The performance medium includes: oboes (2), flute, bassoon (2), trumpet, strings (violins, viola, violoncello, and bass), harp, soloists (S) and mixed chorus (SATB), and basso continuo. The choral number that appears in the appendix on p.183, contains a note, "This chorus comes in page 122." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25949/
Fantaisie pour le piano sur un air de Bellini
This is a digital copy of the "Fantaisie pour le piano sur un air de Bellini" by Leopold von Meyer. The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. This piece was dedicate to the composer Frédéric Chopin. "Fantaisie pour le piano sur un air de Bellini" is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39268/
Fantaisie sur L'elisire d'amore, op. 32
This is a digital copy of the "Fantaisie sur L'elisire d'amore, op. 32" by Leopold von Meyer. The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. This piece was dedicate to the composer the Italian composer Gaspare Spontini (1774-1851). "Fantaisie sur L'elisire d'amore" is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39269/
Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles
This is a digital copy of "Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles" by Leopold von Meyer. The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. This piece was inspired by the bird song "Les hirondelles" (i.e., The swallows) by the French composer Félicien David (1810-1876). "Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles" is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39267/
Fantaisie sur Norma, [op.40]
This is a digital copy of the "Fantaisie sur Norma, [op.40]" by Leopold von Meyer. The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. "Fantaisie sur Norma" is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39270/
La favola di Orfeo
Libretto of the opera "La favola di Orfeo" in several verse forms. Poliziano's version of the legend of Orfeo differs from the story in Monteverdi or Gluck's operas. In Poliziano's ending, Orpheus is torn to pieces by the maenads (or Bacchantes). This copy includes Bernardino Baldi's eclogue "Celeo e l'Orto," a culinary poem that describes the production of polenta. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39258/
La fede ne' tradimenti
This is a 1689 copy of Girolamo Gigli's three-act libretto for the opera "La Fede ne' tradimenti," set to music by Giuseppe Fabbrini for the 1689 Carnival season at the Collegio Tolomei in Siena, Italy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25954/
Fileuse : parodie d'Omphale
When Vadé’s first opera comique, La fileuse, appeared at the Foire St Germain on 8 March 1752, the tragic opera that it parodied—Destouches’s Omphale (1701)—had recently been criticized by Friedrich Melchior Grimm in his “Lettre sur Omphale.” Soon after this attack on “bad taste” in French music, the Querelle des Bouffons heated up, with debates about the merits of Italian comic opera versus French serious opera. Many mid-eighteenth-century French comic parodies were based on familiar serious operas, but following the Querelle des Bouffons, lyrical Italianate melodies were incorporated into the opera comique genre. Vadé’s La fileuse follows the older model of reworking existing tunes to new texts, including a vaudeville finale; later in his career, he composed some original airs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc79/
Finta pazza, drama.
Although Sacrati’s La finta pazza (1641) was immensely popular and influential, the opera has received little discussion in modern scholarship, due in large part to the absence of the music (even the number of extant copies of librettos is very small). Since Lorenzo Bianconi discovery of a score that was used for traveling productions, the opera has received increasing attention. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc44/
Forza del sangue, e della pietà; drama per musica
1686 libretto for Giuseppe Fabrini's opera La forza del sangue, e della pietà. The music for all of Giuseppe Fabrini’s operas, including La forza del sangue e della pietà, is lost. However, the libretti by Gerolamo Gigli, have been preserved for these dramas that were performed at the Collegio Tolomei in Siena. La forza del sangue e della pietà translates as “The Force of Blood and Pity.” digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9/
La Geneviefa
This is a ca. 1685 copy of the three-act libretto of "La Geneviefa" by Girolamo Gigli. The work was dedicated to Prince Francesco Maria of Toscana. The Sienese composer Giuseppe Fabbrini set the libretto to music for an opera staged at the theater of the Collegio Tolomei in Siena. Although the music of the opera is lost, the remark, "Il Sign. Giuseppe Fabrini, che ha data l'anima al verso con l'armonia della musica ..." in the preface of the libretto confirms Fabbrini's setting it to music. Concerning Fabbrini's operas, the Grove Music states that, "His operas to librettos by Gigli were all written for the college theatre which opened in 1685." The opera "La Genefieva" premiered that same year in February. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25956/