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  Partner: UNT Music Library
 Collection: Virtual Music Rare Book Room
Le roy et le fermier

Le roy et le fermier

Date: 1762
Creator: Monsigny, Pierre-Alexandre
Description: This three-act opera was premiered at the Comédie Italien on 22 November 1762.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Rutzvanscad, il giovine

Rutzvanscad, il giovine

Date: 1724
Creator: Valaresso, Zaccaria, 1686-1769.
Description: This is a copy of Cattuffio Panchianio's "Rutzvanscad, il Giovine," a parody of Greek tragedy. The library's copy is bound with the libretto of Giovanni Battista Casti's "Prima la musica e poi le parole." Clarification notes relating to terms and characters of the tragedy appear on the back of p.79 together with a list of printing errors.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Saul : a sacred oratorio, in score

Saul : a sacred oratorio, in score

Date: 1792?
Creator: Handel, George Frideric, 1685-1759.
Description: This is ca. 1792 musical score of Saul, a sacred oratorio by Handel composed in 1738 to the English text by Charles Jennens. The composition year 1740 given in the t.p. might refer to a performance of the oratorio that took place that year. The performance forces include: vocal soloists (SATB), mixed chorus, and orchestra (2 oboes, bassoon, trombones (3), horns (2), strings (violin, viola, violoncello, bass), timpani, organ, harp and continuo). A content index with the incipits of recitatives and arias appears on a separate page at the end of the score.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Saul : Oratorium

Saul : Oratorium

Date: 1820?
Creator: Handel, George Frideric, 1685-1759
Description: This is ca. 1820 vocal score of Handel's oratorio Saul. The orchestra reduction for piano is credited to J.F. [Johann Friedrich] Naue. The hand-written date 1738 that appears at the top of the t.p. underneath Saul corresponds to the year when Handel composed the oratorio. The music parts for the soloists (soprano alto tenor, bass) and the chorus appear at the top of the piano reduction staff.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Serva padrona : intermezzo

Serva padrona : intermezzo

Date: [1804, 1805]
Creator: Pergolesi, Giovanni Battista, 1710-1736
Description: The intermezzo La serva padrona first appeared between the acts of Pergolesi’s Il prigioniero superbo in 1733. This was the standard way in which to present an intermezzo. The work served as comic relief in the midst of more solemn opera serie, and incorporated elements of the improvisational commedia del’arte tradition. For instance, the few characters are drawn from stock types, such as the servant Serpina.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Servante maîtresse : comédie en deux actes mêlée d'ariettes

Servante maîtresse : comédie en deux actes mêlée d'ariettes

Date: 1755
Creator: Pergolesi, Giovanni Battista, 1710-1736 & Federico, Gennaro Antonio, 18th cent
Description: The intermezzo La serva padrona first appeared between the acts of Pergolesi’s Il prigioniero superbo in 1733. This was the standard way in which to present an intermezzo. The work served as comic relief in the midst of more solemn opera serie, and incorporated elements of the improvisational commedia del’arte tradition. For instance, the few characters are drawn from stock types, such as the servant Serpina.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Silvain

Silvain

Date: 1770~
Creator: Grétry, André-Ernest-Modeste, 1741-1813
Description: This one-act opera to a libretto by Marmontel is dedicated "a son Altesse Royale Monseigneur Le Prince Charles de Pologne." This full score features a catalogue of Grétry's music on the verso of the title page. The opera was premiered in Paris on 19 February 1770 at the Comédie-Italiènne.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Sofonisba

Sofonisba

Date: 1764
Creator: Verazi, Mattia.
Description: This is a ca. 1764 copy of the libretto of the opera seria "Sofonisba" by Mattia Verazi. Baldassare Galuppi set this libretto to music for the 1764 carnival season in Turin. Mattia Verazi became a court poet at Mannheim and Stuttgart in 1756. Duke Carl Eugen favored operas with French influence, and Verazi catered to his tastes by providing libretti that deviated from Metastasian opera conventions. In 1762, Verazi and Tommaso Traeta collaborated to create operas following French models. Sofonisba was the result of such collaboration. Sofonisba and Siface, king of Numidia, are married and have a child. When Siface fails to return from battle against the Romans, Massinissa, Sofonisba’s former suitor, renews his advances. Siface appears among the captives and rejoins his wife but fail in their attempt to escape from their Roman captors. Afraid that she will be marched in chains through the streets of Rome, Sofonisba poisons herself and is dying when the news arrives that all has been resolved. Baldassare Galuppi composed the music of the opera for the 1764 Turin carnival season. The opening scene includes a programmatic sinfonia that accompanies a pantomimed battle, and later, another pantomime that depicts gladiatorial games. Verazi included detailed ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Songs in the new opera call'd Arsinoe, queen of Cyprus

Songs in the new opera call'd Arsinoe, queen of Cyprus

Date: 1705
Creator: Clayton, Thomas, 1673-1725
Description: Thomas Clayton’s first opera, Arsinoe, Queen of Cyprus, premiered at Drury Lane in London on 16 January 1705. The opera initially enjoyed success, but two years later, Clayton’s second opera was not well-received. Part of Arsinoe’s popularity may have been due to Catherine Tofts' portrayal of the title character; Toft would later become a star of the English stage.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Sosarme

Sosarme

Date: 1788
Creator: Handel, George Frideric, 1685-1759.
Description: This item is a copy from [ca. 1790] of the score of Handel's opera Sosarme to a libretto by Matteo Noris. The performance forces include: oboe, horns, strings (violin, viola, bass), continuo, and soloist singers. A list of important musical numbers, solo arias and duets of each act appears on p.116. The names of the subscribers appear on pp.[119-120]. The title page contains an engraving showing two mythological figures [possibly, the god Apollo and the Muse Erato] and musical instruments signed by the London engraver [John] Strongitharm of Pall Mall.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library